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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

F-plug need to be fully tightened?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 15th 08, 01:27 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Peto
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?

I'm in the UK. I have the usual F-series connector on the coax
entering my cable modem.

http://www.newtechindustries.com/new...es/200-045.jpg

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?
  #2  
Old September 15th 08, 01:54 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Steve
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?


"Peto" wrote in message
...
I'm in the UK. I have the usual F-series connector on the coax
entering my cable modem.

http://www.newtechindustries.com/new...es/200-045.jpg

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Hand tight is sufficient, yes. Its rare I would tighten them up any more
than hand tight for most jobs,


  #3  
Old September 15th 08, 02:26 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
TT_Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Hand tight is sufficient, yes. Its rare I would tighten them up any more
than hand tight for most jobs,


Yep. a hand job is just the biz.......


  #4  
Old September 15th 08, 02:34 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Palindrome
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?

Peto wrote:
I'm in the UK. I have the usual F-series connector on the coax
entering my cable modem.

http://www.newtechindustries.com/new...es/200-045.jpg

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Yep, for what you have in mind.

You can also, IIUC, get adapters to go on the end of the F plug and turn
it into "push on". Which will probably give a more reliable result as
"loose hand tight" could very easily turn into "fallen off -lying on the
floor".

--
Sue
  #5  
Old September 15th 08, 04:53 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
TT_Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?


At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true electrical
contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Yep, for what you have in mind.

You can also, IIUC, get adapters to go on the end of the F plug and turn
it into "push on". Which will probably give a more reliable result as
"loose hand tight" could very easily turn into "fallen off -lying on the
floor".

--
Sue


Sorry, Sue, it won't be more reliable, just very convenient if you are
continually removing/replacing F connectors into various pieces of
equipment......... By your reasoning, then both will fall off The push on
F connector adapter is very prone to falling out of the back of whatever
it's connected to....... but boy, is it handy


  #6  
Old September 15th 08, 06:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 601
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?


"Peto" wrote in message
...
I'm in the UK. I have the usual F-series connector on the coax
entering my cable modem.

http://www.newtechindustries.com/new...es/200-045.jpg

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Plug, lube, Vaseline, contact, hand-tight.....
Oo-er Missus!

George


  #7  
Old September 15th 08, 11:30 PM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Tim Perry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?


"Peto" wrote in message
...
I'm in the UK. I have the usual F-series connector on the coax
entering my cable modem.

http://www.newtechindustries.com/new...es/200-045.jpg

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Grease should only be used when making a weather tight seal. i.e. outdoors.
Typically a silicon sealer on 'N' connectors.

Grease is not commonly used on F connector threads. Some weather tight
models exude a sealer when crimped... but not on the threads.

Hand tight is insufficient in this case because one of tech support's first
questions is invariably "is your cable firmly attached" (I think it's on the
cue card).

Likewise any modification or adaptor you add will bear the brunt of blame in
any "discussion" with tech support or field service.

Constant plugging and unplugging of a F connector is not recommended because
the jack is likely to wear out making the center conductor connection
intermittent.


  #8  
Old September 16th 08, 01:03 AM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Jamie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?

TT_Man wrote:

--------

I need to remove the connector every now and then so I lubed the
threads with a smear of vaseline.

At these RF frequencies (about 340 MHz) do I need to have true
electrical contact between the plug and socket or is close proximity
enough?

Would loose "hand tight" be sufficent?


Hand tight is sufficient, yes. Its rare I would tighten them up any more
than hand tight for most jobs,



Yep. a hand job is just the biz.......


Man of experience!

http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5"

  #9  
Old September 16th 08, 02:08 AM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
GoldIntermetallicEmbrittlement
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?

On Mon, 15 Sep 2008 17:30:23 -0400, "Tim Perry"
wrote:

Grease is not commonly used on F connector threads. Some weather tight
models exude a sealer when crimped... but not on the threads.



Not true. There are several cities where the cable contractors followed
the CORRECT methodology of SEALING their fittings with an
anti-oxidant/moisture barrier.

This has NOTHING to do with U/G coax cabling, which has a liquid
sealant layer between the sheath (jacket) and the first braid or foil
layer.

That's the threads, AND the "stinger". From a man hour POV, it is
easier to simply plop a wad of it in the fitting, then the center
conductor as well as the threads get the application. The media does not
damage the connector or ANY fitting it gets mated with.

Cable companies are SUPPOSED to cut back their fittings every ten years
and place a new, properly treated fitting.
THAT is what the original plan called for, and is also what SHOULD BE
practiced. A ten year old uncoated fitting will have far more losses (can
have) than one which has had anti-oxidant treatment after a ten year
span.

So, in a PROPERLY implemented cable system, treatment IS the common
practice and teaching.

Where did I learn this? Cincinnati's Time Warner (formerly CUBE) cable
system. Way back in the early 80's. That was a DUAL system, so every
run was twice the number of fittings. Every hard line run was twice the
number. Dual taps at every node. All sealed from moisture.
  #10  
Old September 16th 08, 03:01 AM posted to alt.engineering.electrical,sci.electronics.components,uk.telecom.broadband
Tim Perry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default F-plug need to be fully tightened?


"GoldIntermetallicEmbrittlement"
g wrote in message
...
On Mon, 15 Sep 2008 17:30:23 -0400, "Tim Perry"
wrote:

Grease is not commonly used on F connector threads. Some weather tight
models exude a sealer when crimped... but not on the threads.



Not true. There are several cities where the cable contractors followed
the CORRECT methodology of SEALING their fittings with an
anti-oxidant/moisture barrier.


You have a choice between conductive gunk which will tend to short out the
connection or non-conductive gunk which will tend to block the flow of
electrons where you would like them to flow. Take your pick. I pick neither.

Time Warner in new York picks neither also, as least as far as far as indoor
instillations go.

Given the OP's constant unplugging of the cable I doubt oxidization will
ever be a problem for him.


 




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