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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 16th 08, 08:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Michael
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?

M


  #2  
Old September 16th 08, 10:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
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Posts: 876
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?


I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base
plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Your usage pattern will likely change when you get broadband,
for one thing you wont be concerned that your internet is tying
up your phone line.
Routers are best kept on 24/7 especially with rate-adaptive
(up to 8 Mbs) products because of the continuous way
the line conditions are monitored and optimised. That said
if you must unplug the router a couple of times a day
you will be in exactly the same position as the many users that
use a USB modem that loses power when the host computer
is closed down.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%


  #3  
Old September 16th 08, 10:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark McIntyre
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 192
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

Michael wrote:

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


No, but whats the point? The power consumption is very low, a few watts.
Easier just to leave it running.
However if you really want to, you can switch it off. You'll need to
leave it for a couple of minutes after switching it on, before your PC
will connect to the internet.
  #4  
Old September 16th 08, 10:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PeeGee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 315
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

Graham. wrote:
I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base
plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Your usage pattern will likely change when you get broadband,
for one thing you wont be concerned that your internet is tying
up your phone line.
Routers are best kept on 24/7 especially with rate-adaptive
(up to 8 Mbs) products because of the continuous way
the line conditions are monitored and optimised. That said
if you must unplug the router a couple of times a day
you will be in exactly the same position as the many users that
use a USB modem that loses power when the host computer
is closed down.


If you take the 2Mb/s base service then there should not be a problem
(with the service) if you switch the router off. That's the way I work
as it's not rate adaptive AFAIK - I always get 2Mb/s with a relatively
poor 63.9dB attenuation and 13dB SNR on a LLU exchange.

--
PeeGee

"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
  #5  
Old September 16th 08, 11:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ato_Zee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?


I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Do your own tests, when a router first connects (which can be
after it has been switched off) it will try to establish it best sync
speed compatible with the default SNR, for BT this seems to
be around 12db. If you are on a poor or noisy line this speed will
soon fall as the speed adapts to the poor line conditions.
But if the line runs stable, the line may (rarely after a long
interval) increase in speed.
So switching off can in some cases restore at a higher
speed, or with frequent switching the DSLAM at the exchange
may see the line as unstable and lower the speed.
It is suck it and see.
In general the recommendation is leave it
on 24/7, most routers take around 10 watts or less,
which is for most purposes negligable, and for most
users it gives a reliable service.
  #6  
Old September 17th 08, 12:30 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,222
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?



Michael wrote:

I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Not as such but you might want to leave it on 24/7 for the fist 2 weeks so it
and the exchange equipment 'learn' your line quality or your speed may be
restricted. Most people leave them on though. Note that wireless routers consume
more power.

Graham

  #7  
Old September 17th 08, 09:10 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
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Posts: 1,000
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

Michael wrote:
I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?

M


Not really, no.

  #8  
Old September 17th 08, 09:11 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,000
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

Graham. wrote:
I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base
plan
at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Your usage pattern will likely change when you get broadband,
for one thing you wont be concerned that your internet is tying
up your phone line.
Routers are best kept on 24/7 especially with rate-adaptive
(up to 8 Mbs) products because of the continuous way
the line conditions are monitored and optimised. That said
if you must unplug the router a couple of times a day
you will be in exactly the same position as the many users that
use a USB modem that loses power when the host computer
is closed down.

The only problems i get on rebooting, is a period of instability when
the thing connects a bit faster than normal, and takes time to resynch
back to a more stable setting.
  #9  
Old September 17th 08, 09:13 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Retired
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?


"Michael" [email protected] address.com wrote in message
...
I am on dialup paying 10 a month. Sky would like me to have their base
plan at no cost, although with a hefty connection fee.

I have no experience of broadband, routers etc apart from what I have read
on this forum

I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?

M


I switch my modem router off each night, no problems - it takes no longer
than the computer to boot up.
In fact if I leave it on, I often seem to have problems in getting a
connection the next day and am forced to switch it off to make it reboot.
B.
  #10  
Old September 17th 08, 09:56 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PeeGee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 315
Default Can Routers Be Switched Off When Not In Use ?

Ato_Zee wrote:
I use the Internet for 5 hours max a day and wouldn't want a router
connected when not required. Would there be problems with this ?


Do your own tests, when a router first connects (which can be
after it has been switched off) it will try to establish it best sync
speed compatible with the default SNR, for BT this seems to
be around 12db. If you are on a poor or noisy line this speed will
soon fall as the speed adapts to the poor line conditions.
But if the line runs stable, the line may (rarely after a long
interval) increase in speed.
So switching off can in some cases restore at a higher
speed, or with frequent switching the DSLAM at the exchange
may see the line as unstable and lower the speed.


I use a single socket to supply monitor, PC and router and switch on,
use and switch off - on some days it may be five or six times. The
Netgear router *always* connects at 2Mb/s and stays at that level. Most
respondents seem to be forgetting the OP was asking about the *base*
(free) package :-)

It is suck it and see.
In general the recommendation is leave it
on 24/7, most routers take around 10 watts or less,
which is for most purposes negligable, and for most
users it gives a reliable service.


That is true (@ 10p/unit, 9 per year).

--
PeeGee

"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
 




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