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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Homeplug network at home.



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 25th 09, 12:26 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
David Boneham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Homeplug network at home.

[This followup was posted to uk.comp.home-networking and a copy was sent
to the cited author.]

I am trying to solve a network problem at home. I have an adsl
connection into a Netgear DG834 modem/router. From this there are
ethernet connections to a couple of computers downstairs. These work
fine.

My problem is connection to computers upstairs through stone floors.
Wireless networking has proved ineffective.

I have an ethernet connection from my adsl modem/ router to a Powerline
adapter downstairs; and an ethernet connection from a Powerline adapter
to my son's computer upstairs. This works fine. But I cannot get a
connection to a third Powerline adapter connecting to another child's
computer upstairs.

Am I misunderstanding something? Do Powerline adapters work in pairs -
one at the computer end and the other at the router end?

The Powerline adapters that I have include a NetTricity Powerline 200M
ethernet bridge, and Netgear Powerline HDX101 HD Ethernet Adapters.

Thank you.

  #2  
Old January 25th 09, 01:48 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jeff Gaines
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 401
Default Homeplug network at home.

On 25/01/2009 in message
David Boneham wrote:

I have an ethernet connection from my adsl modem/ router to a Powerline
adapter downstairs; and an ethernet connection from a Powerline adapter
to my son's computer upstairs. This works fine. But I cannot get a
connection to a third Powerline adapter connecting to another child's
computer upstairs.

Am I misunderstanding something? Do Powerline adapters work in pairs -
one at the computer end and the other at the router end?


One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be fine - as
long as they are all on the same ring circuit. Is there anything different
about the power in the additional bedroom, e.g. on a separate power
circuit, a spur, connected via a distribution board/surge socket etc.?

--
Jeff Gaines Damerham Hampshire UK
All those who believe in psychokinesis raise my hand.
  #3  
Old January 25th 09, 04:01 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Will
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Homeplug network at home.


"Jeff Gaines" wrote in message
...
On 25/01/2009 in message
David Boneham wrote:

I have an ethernet connection from my adsl modem/ router to a Powerline
adapter downstairs; and an ethernet connection from a Powerline adapter
to my son's computer upstairs. This works fine. But I cannot get a
connection to a third Powerline adapter connecting to another child's
computer upstairs.

Am I misunderstanding something? Do Powerline adapters work in pairs -
one at the computer end and the other at the router end?


One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be fine - as
long as they are all on the same ring circuit. Is there anything different
about the power in the additional bedroom, e.g. on a separate power
circuit, a spur, connected via a distribution board/surge socket etc.?

--


Same type (mode), same encryption, same passphrase ???
- I'd expect you'd to need all three of the above to match.
(to save any T,D or H connecting in 2 doors away)


  #4  
Old January 27th 09, 12:05 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Chris Davies
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 444
Default Homeplug network at home.

Jeff Gaines wrote:
One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be fine - as
long as they are all on the same ring circuit.


Why do they need to be all on the same ring?

I was considering homeplug as an option for getting cabling from the top
of my house to the bottom, because the wireless struggles to reach that
far. But each floor is on a different ring, so maybe this wouldn't work,
either.

Thanks,
Chris
  #5  
Old January 27th 09, 04:58 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Will
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Homeplug network at home.


"Chris Davies" wrote in message
...
Jeff Gaines wrote:
One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be fine -
as
long as they are all on the same ring circuit.


Why do they need to be all on the same ring?

I was considering homeplug as an option for getting cabling from the top
of my house to the bottom, because the wireless struggles to reach that
far. But each floor is on a different ring, so maybe this wouldn't work,
either.

Thanks,
Chris


They don't - as proven¹.

¹ - well the type exhaustively tested here.


  #6  
Old January 27th 09, 06:19 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
harry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Homeplug network at home.



DB I am trying to solve a network problem at home. I have an adsl
DB connection into a Netgear DG834 modem/router. From this there are
DB ethernet connections to a couple of computers downstairs. These work
DB fine.

DB My problem is connection to computers upstairs through stone floors.
DB Wireless networking has proved ineffective.

DB I have an ethernet connection from my adsl modem/ router to a Powerline
DB adapter downstairs; and an ethernet connection from a Powerline adapter
DB to my son's computer upstairs. This works fine. But I cannot get a
DB connection to a third Powerline adapter connecting to another child's
DB computer upstairs.

DB Am I misunderstanding something? Do Powerline adapters work in pairs -
DB one at the computer end and the other at the router end?

DB The Powerline adapters that I have include a NetTricity Powerline 200M
DB ethernet bridge, and Netgear Powerline HDX101 HD Ethernet Adapters.


Hi Ihave the same modem/router and 3 home plugs. One one the router
downstairs (1 ring main) one on the comp upstairs (different ring) and one
in my workshop(old cooker circuit)and they all work perfect using netmagic


  #7  
Old January 28th 09, 02:11 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default Homeplug network at home.

On Tue, 27 Jan 2009 12:05:30 +0000
Chris Davies wrote:

Jeff Gaines wrote:
One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be
fine - as long as they are all on the same ring circuit.


Why do they need to be all on the same ring?

They don't - they do need to be on the same phase of the supply,
but most houses only have a single phase supply anyway. If you do want
to use homeplug across different phases you can bridge the phases with a
couple more homeplug devices.

  #8  
Old January 28th 09, 11:58 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Bernard Peek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 202
Default Homeplug network at home.

In message [email protected], Rob Morley
writes
On Tue, 27 Jan 2009 12:05:30 +0000
Chris Davies wrote:

Jeff Gaines wrote:
One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be
fine - as long as they are all on the same ring circuit.


Why do they need to be all on the same ring?

They don't - they do need to be on the same phase of the supply,
but most houses only have a single phase supply anyway. If you do want
to use homeplug across different phases you can bridge the phases with a
couple more homeplug devices.


You should never find two different phases in the same domestic
building.

The consensus when Homeplug has been discussed before is that it
generally works anywhere within the same dwelling but the signal doesn't
usually reach as far as adjacent dwellings although exceptions to both
of these rules have been seen.



--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author.

  #9  
Old January 28th 09, 06:56 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
robert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Homeplug network at home.

Bernard Peek wrote:
In message [email protected], Rob Morley
writes
On Tue, 27 Jan 2009 12:05:30 +0000
Chris Davies wrote:

Jeff Gaines wrote:
One at the computer end and as many others as you like should be
fine - as long as they are all on the same ring circuit.

Why do they need to be all on the same ring?

They don't - they do need to be on the same phase of the supply,
but most houses only have a single phase supply anyway. If you do want
to use homeplug across different phases you can bridge the phases with a
couple more homeplug devices.


You should never find two different phases in the same domestic building.

The consensus when Homeplug has been discussed before is that it
generally works anywhere within the same dwelling but the signal doesn't
usually reach as far as adjacent dwellings although exceptions to both
of these rules have been seen.



Do you have more than 1 consumer Unit (fuse box) serving the house ?
Have you got all homeplugs working together when closer together on the
same circuit ?
  #10  
Old January 28th 09, 08:50 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Will
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Homeplug network at home.


The consensus when Homeplug has been discussed before is that it generally
works anywhere within the same dwelling but the signal doesn't usually
reach as far as adjacent dwellings although exceptions to both of these
rules have been seen.

See above & elsewhere.
Because usually adjacent properties are on a different phase. But try +2
and you have a chance, albeit small.


 




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