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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

VoIP and wireless networking



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 3rd 09, 10:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
1506
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default VoIP and wireless networking


I am considering running my VoIP system on the far side of a wireless
link. i.e. My internet service comes thru a cable interface into
which I plug a router with wireless capability. I plan to use a
remote wireless bridge into which I will plug my TPAs/ATAs.

Does anyone know if I should anticipate any issues with this
arrangement?

Thanks
  #2  
Old March 3rd 09, 11:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Gordon Henderson
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Posts: 797
Default VoIP and wireless networking

In article ,
1506 wrote:

I am considering running my VoIP system on the far side of a wireless
link. i.e. My internet service comes thru a cable interface into
which I plug a router with wireless capability. I plan to use a
remote wireless bridge into which I will plug my TPAs/ATAs.

Does anyone know if I should anticipate any issues with this
arrangement?


You can "get away" with it, but unless you're using access points or
bridges which support traffic management, you'll get problems when a
non VoIP device transfers data over the link.

Think of small packets at high speed in both directions at the same time
over a half duplex link vs. streaming a file or email, etc. which are
big packets back to pack in one direction only.

Run a cat-5 cable if you can, or use DECT.

Gordon
  #3  
Old March 4th 09, 01:19 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default VoIP and wireless networking

On Mar 3, 2:10*pm, Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,

1506 wrote:

I am considering running my VoIP system on the far side of a wireless
link. *i.e. My internet service comes thru a cable interface into
which I plug a router with wireless capability. * I plan to use a
remote wireless bridge into which I will plug my TPAs/ATAs.


Does anyone know if I should anticipate any issues with this
arrangement?


You can "get away" with it, but unless you're using access points or
bridges which support traffic management, you'll get problems when a
non VoIP device transfers data over the link.

Think of small packets at high speed in both directions at the same time
over a half duplex link vs. streaming a file or email, etc. which are
big packets back to pack in one direction only.

Run a cat-5 cable if you can, or use DECT.

Gordon


Thanks Gordon.

That pretty much answers my question.

Adrian

  #4  
Old March 4th 09, 08:14 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Sinna
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Posts: 42
Default VoIP and wireless networking

1506 wrote:
I am considering running my VoIP system on the far side of a wireless
link. i.e. My internet service comes thru a cable interface into
which I plug a router with wireless capability. I plan to use a
remote wireless bridge into which I will plug my TPAs/ATAs.

Does anyone know if I should anticipate any issues with this
arrangement?

Thanks


I've tried it once, but for VoIP you need a quite good stable throughput
(non fluctuating speeds), otherwise it won't work out very good (read:
interruptions, delays, ...)

Perhaps you can consider Power-on-LAN (Devolo) to have a wired bridge if
you don't want to run an UTP-cable. I haven't tried it myself (don't
like radiation all over the place), but I expect it to work.


Sinna
  #5  
Old March 4th 09, 09:17 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
news1001
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Posts: 7
Default VoIP and wireless networking

Gordon,

Advise please ?

I have a need for a POE switch, 24 ports + at least 2 fibre ports +vpn,
any recommendations ?

Regards,
Mike
--
news1001
  #6  
Old March 4th 09, 09:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Jono
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Posts: 1,539
Default VoIP and wireless networking

news1001 wrote :
Gordon,

Advise please ?

I have a need for a POE switch, 24 ports + at least 2 fibre ports +vpn,
any recommendations ?

Regards,
Mike


I'd be tempted to use an injector for the PoE; then source a switch
with fibre & VPN separately.


  #7  
Old March 4th 09, 11:44 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Tim
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Posts: 385
Default VoIP and wireless networking

Jono wrote:

I'd be tempted to use an injector for the PoE; then source a switch with
fibre & VPN separately.


I would too.

how do you get a VPN on a switch anyway? Do you mean VLAN?


A HP Procurve 1700-24 (J9080A) + a phihong 24 port injector is a good
combination.

Also, PoE is changing. We've always used 802.3af kit. This provides
15.4 watts per port and is great for IP phones etc.

When you move onto wireless access ports and wimax radios, you need more
power. The new standard is 802.3at which provides 33.6W of power per port.

Tim

  #8  
Old March 4th 09, 12:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Gordon Henderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 797
Default VoIP and wireless networking

In article ,
news1001 wrote:
Gordon,

Advise please ?

I have a need for a POE switch, 24 ports + at least 2 fibre ports +vpn,
any recommendations ?


Probably best to start a new thread for a new questions - keeps everything
separate...

However the only PoE switches I've first hand experience of is the basic
Netgear ones - nice little switches, but not what you're after.

If you have an existing network with switches you like, it might be
better to look at in-line injectors so then the learning curve to program
new switches is zero - however these require another set of (24) patch
leads - out of the switch into the injector, then out of the injector
as before. Shouldn't really be an issue if you already have a "comms
rack" though.

You'd not normally run a VPN to a switch though, and switches ought to
be transparent to VPNs anyway.

(Maybe you mean some sort of management? SNMP?)

ProVu have some multiport injectors:

http://www.provu.co.uk/phihong_midspan.html

Other than that you might be looking at a switch with SFP ports - and
separate fibre modules eg. Linksys SGE2000P... But they're not cheap...

Gordon
  #9  
Old March 4th 09, 03:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Jono
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,539
Default VoIP and wireless networking

Tim formulated the question :
Jono wrote:

I'd be tempted to use an injector for the PoE; then source a switch with
fibre & VPN separately.


I would too.

how do you get a VPN on a switch anyway? Do you mean VLAN?


Haha, yes, I can see why you might think that.

What I should have said was, "then source VPN & a switch with
fibre separately."


  #10  
Old March 4th 09, 03:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Jono
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,539
Default VoIP and wireless networking

Gordon Henderson has brought this to us :


If you have an existing network with switches you like, it might be
better to look at in-line injectors so then the learning curve to program
new switches is zero - however these require another set of (24) patch
leads - out of the switch into the injector, then out of the injector
as before. Shouldn't really be an issue if you already have a "comms
rack" though.


A guy at our place likes nothing more than sitting down and making up
24 3 inch long leads, in the best colour, of course, to make "his" cab
look really neat.


 




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