A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Laptops and networking



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 6th 09, 02:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
B.A.L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Laptops and networking

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host computer, and
run another laptop on a wireless connection from it? Or does it have to be
a PC? I think both are running Vista Basic. (I'm asking on behalf of a
friend)

Many thanks.


  #2  
Old March 6th 09, 02:52 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default Laptops and networking

On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:36:34 -0000
"B.A.L." wrote:

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host
computer, and run another laptop on a wireless connection from it?


You can, although I'm not sure you'd want to. Is it internet sharing
you're after?

Or does it have to be a PC?


A laptop is a PC (even Apple laptops are PCs in the "IBM compatible"
sense these days).

  #3  
Old March 6th 09, 03:06 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
B.A.L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Laptops and networking


"Rob Morley" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:36:34 -0000
"B.A.L." wrote:

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host
computer, and run another laptop on a wireless connection from it?


You can, although I'm not sure you'd want to. Is it internet sharing
you're after?


Why do you say that, Rob? Yes, it's internet sharing they're after.

Thanks.



Or does it have to be a PC?


A laptop is a PC (even Apple laptops are PCs in the "IBM compatible"
sense these days).



  #4  
Old March 6th 09, 04:40 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Mark Goodge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default Laptops and networking

On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 15:06:57 -0000, B.A.L. put finger to keyboard and
typed:


"Rob Morley" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:36:34 -0000
"B.A.L." wrote:

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host
computer, and run another laptop on a wireless connection from it?


You can, although I'm not sure you'd want to. Is it internet sharing
you're after?


Why do you say that, Rob? Yes, it's internet sharing they're after.


Because the most sensible and reliable way of doing Internet sharing
is to have a router (a wireless router, in your case) that two or more
computers can access independently, rather than having a modem on one
computer and using that as a gateway for another.

Mark
--
Blog: http://mark.goodge.co.uk
Stuff: http://www.good-stuff.co.uk
  #5  
Old March 8th 09, 01:00 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
B.A.L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Laptops and networking


"Mark Goodge" wrote in message
house.net...
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 15:06:57 -0000, B.A.L. put finger to keyboard and
typed:


"Rob Morley" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:36:34 -0000
"B.A.L." wrote:

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host
computer, and run another laptop on a wireless connection from it?

You can, although I'm not sure you'd want to. Is it internet sharing
you're after?


Why do you say that, Rob? Yes, it's internet sharing they're after.


Because the most sensible and reliable way of doing Internet sharing
is to have a router (a wireless router, in your case) that two or more
computers can access independently, rather than having a modem on one
computer and using that as a gateway for another.

Mark
--
Blog: http://mark.goodge.co.uk
Stuff: http://www.good-stuff.co.uk



Hi Mark, thanks for your reply. I always thought that, to run a wireless
network, there had to be a host computer (with the wireless router
attached) - am I right in thinking, that after the initial router set up,
this isn't the case? If so, I've been mistaken in this way of thinking for
years :-(

Many thanks.
Bob


  #6  
Old March 8th 09, 01:32 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dave J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Laptops and networking

In on Sun, 8 Mar 2009
01:00:53 -0000, in uk.comp.home-networking, 'B.A.L.' wrote:

[...]

Hi Mark, thanks for your reply. I always thought that, to run a wireless
network, there had to be a host computer (with the wireless router
attached) - am I right in thinking, that after the initial router set up,
this isn't the case? If so, I've been mistaken in this way of thinking for
years :-(


Sorry, not Mark replying, but yes, I'm afraid you don't need a computer to
act as the internet gateway. To provide internet access to a local subnet
you need a gateway device, something that picks up packets that aren't
meant for any local computer and routes them out to the internet (and
routes the replies back again). You /can/ use a computer to do this job,
and in fact routers *are* computers; very very dedicated computers but
computers nonetheless.

Whichever method of distribution you use you need a modem if the internet
provision is via ADSL but that part is essentially invisible as far as the
rest of your routing is concerned (packets auto-magically find their way
from your default gateway to the ISP's internet gateway).

All that the local computers need to know is your local 'default gateway'
IP address, which is the address to which any non-local packets are sent,
in the assumption that the machine at that address will figure out a way
to get them to their final destination.

The cheapest and most reliable method is to use a dedicated router box for
a gateway as a) it won't be particularly likely to crash on you, b) it
will use somewhat less background power when the computer you're using
doesn't happen to be the gateway machine and c) as it uses a minimum of
power it's affordable to leave it powered up and logged on most of the
time, which saves uncertainty and delay when you need internet access. The
internet is then always available as far as every machine on your local
network is concerned.

Hope that's clear enough, the idea is you set a router up, the switch
that's built into it passes packets between the local machines and the
router/modem part of it hands non-local packets out to the interenet. Once
set up it's fairly safely forgotten and is one less worry.

Dave J.
  #7  
Old March 8th 09, 09:43 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dave Wade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default Laptops and networking



"B.A.L." wrote in message
...

"Mark Goodge" wrote in message
house.net...
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 15:06:57 -0000, B.A.L. put finger to keyboard and
typed:


"Rob Morley" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:36:34 -0000
"B.A.L." wrote:

Probably a silly question, but can you have a laptop as a host
computer, and run another laptop on a wireless connection from it?

You can, although I'm not sure you'd want to. Is it internet sharing
you're after?

Why do you say that, Rob? Yes, it's internet sharing they're after.


Because the most sensible and reliable way of doing Internet sharing
is to have a router (a wireless router, in your case) that two or more
computers can access independently, rather than having a modem on one
computer and using that as a gateway for another.

Mark
--
Blog: http://mark.goodge.co.uk
Stuff: http://www.good-stuff.co.uk



Hi Mark, thanks for your reply. I always thought that, to run a wireless
network, there had to be a host computer (with the wireless router
attached) - am I right in thinking, that after the initial router set up,
this isn't the case? If so, I've been mistaken in this way of thinking
for years :-(


A wireless router is really two devices in one box. A router for connecting
the local NETWORK to the internet, and a "Wireless Access Point" for
connecting wireless computers into the local NETWORK. Its often convenient
to set up the Wireless Access Point from a wired PC as it can make setting
the security simpler. Older wireless cards sometimes needed a re-boot to
switch from OPEN to Secured.

In general all the computers on the local network are usually equal, unless
you set things differently in the router....

And as you say once its set up you can switch on the computer on the wired
network. If you only have a lap top, they usually have wired ports as well
so you can use that to set it up, and then switch to wireless...




Many thanks.
Bob

 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Laptops - Compare And Buy [email protected] uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 0 June 19th 07 06:54 PM
Cheap Laptops AF uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 2 August 17th 04 02:15 AM
Cheap Laptops Dotcom Computers uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 2 August 2nd 04 09:18 PM
OT : wireless networking of many laptops TX2 uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 0 April 28th 04 07:41 PM
UK Prisoners to get Wi-Fi and Laptops ? Andrew Pick uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 7 April 1st 04 09:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.