A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

How essential dust shutters on wall socket?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 3rd 09, 04:19 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Eddie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the electrical
contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my socket, leave the
socket empty for many months and then later put a plug n?

Please don't ask why: it's too complicated to explain!

I'm half hoping the shutter is present as a second level of dust
protection because there might be some dust-removing capability
built into the design of the plug and socket.

Any experiences of this?

Thank you for any info!
  #2  
Old May 3rd 09, 04:26 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
David Woolley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

Eddie wrote:
Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the electrical
contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my socket, leave the
socket empty for many months and then later put a plug n?


I believe the purpose of the shutter is electrical safety, not dust
protection. Telephone line voltages are classified as Low Voltage,
whereas what you would think of as low voltage is actually Extra Low
Voltage. Telephone voltages are in the same class as mains electricity,
and can peak at around 110 volts, even without worrying about mains
earth faults.

As I recall, telephone sockets had to bend the rules to be allowed at all.

Note it is bad practice to post to newsgroup and its child.
  #3  
Old May 3rd 09, 05:55 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?



"David Woolley" wrote in message
...
Eddie wrote:
Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the electrical contacts
if I remove the dust shutter on my socket, leave the socket empty for
many months and then later put a plug n?


I believe the purpose of the shutter is electrical safety, not dust
protection. Telephone line voltages are classified as Low Voltage,
whereas what you would think of as low voltage is actually Extra Low
Voltage. Telephone voltages are in the same class as mains electricity,
and can peak at around 110 volts, even without worrying about mains earth
faults.

As I recall, telephone sockets had to bend the rules to be allowed at all.

Note it is bad practice to post to newsgroup and its child.


I agree the x-post to two groups was unnecessary, but I have
never thought of u.t.b as inferior to u.t

Interestingly, trailing extension-lead sockets rarely if ever
have shutters, and they are more accessible to little fingers
and even tongues!

Unless the air is particularly contaminated with dust particles
I think the OP is worrying too much.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%


  #4  
Old May 3rd 09, 06:09 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 211
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

"Graham" wrote in message
...


"David Woolley" wrote in
message ...
Eddie wrote:
Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the
electrical contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my
socket, leave the socket empty for many months and then later
put a plug n?


I believe the purpose of the shutter is electrical safety, not
dust protection. Telephone line voltages are classified as
Low Voltage, whereas what you would think of as low voltage is
actually Extra Low Voltage. Telephone voltages are in the
same class as mains electricity, and can peak at around 110
volts, even without worrying about mains earth faults.

As I recall, telephone sockets had to bend the rules to be
allowed at all.

Note it is bad practice to post to newsgroup and its child.


I agree the x-post to two groups was unnecessary, but I have
never thought of u.t.b as inferior to u.t

Interestingly, trailing extension-lead sockets rarely if ever
have shutters, and they are more accessible to little fingers
and even tongues!

Unless the air is particularly contaminated with dust particles
I think the OP is worrying too much.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%



Sorry Graham, wrong.

Trailing socket outlets ALWAYS have shutters - IMSMC it is part
of BS1363.


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


  #5  
Old May 3rd 09, 07:22 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 164
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?


Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the
electrical contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my
socket, leave the socket empty for many months and then later
put a plug n?

I believe the purpose of the shutter is electrical safety, not
dust protection. Telephone line voltages are classified as
Low Voltage, whereas what you would think of as low voltage is
actually Extra Low Voltage. Telephone voltages are in the
same class as mains electricity, and can peak at around 110
volts, even without worrying about mains earth faults.

As I recall, telephone sockets had to bend the rules to be
allowed at all.

Note it is bad practice to post to newsgroup and its child.


I agree the x-post to two groups was unnecessary, but I have
never thought of u.t.b as inferior to u.t

Interestingly, trailing extension-lead sockets rarely if ever
have shutters, and they are more accessible to little fingers
and even tongues!

Unless the air is particularly contaminated with dust particles
I think the OP is worrying too much.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%



Sorry Graham, wrong.

Trailing socket outlets ALWAYS have shutters - IMSMC it is part
of BS1363.


Well non of the bog-standard extension leads I have here are shuttered.
No doubt they are manufactured in the Far East, but they are widely
on sale here from reputable sources and Supermarkets.
Ditto for socket doublers etc.
Ditto for ADSL filter/splitters.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%


  #6  
Old May 3rd 09, 07:45 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Andrews
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?


"Graham." wrote in message
...

Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the
electrical contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my
socket, leave the socket empty for many months and then later
put a plug n?

I believe the purpose of the shutter is electrical safety, not
dust protection. Telephone line voltages are classified as
Low Voltage, whereas what you would think of as low voltage is
actually Extra Low Voltage. Telephone voltages are in the
same class as mains electricity, and can peak at around 110
volts, even without worrying about mains earth faults.

As I recall, telephone sockets had to bend the rules to be
allowed at all.

Note it is bad practice to post to newsgroup and its child.

I agree the x-post to two groups was unnecessary, but I have
never thought of u.t.b as inferior to u.t

Interestingly, trailing extension-lead sockets rarely if ever
have shutters, and they are more accessible to little fingers
and even tongues!

Unless the air is particularly contaminated with dust particles
I think the OP is worrying too much.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%



Sorry Graham, wrong.

Trailing socket outlets ALWAYS have shutters - IMSMC it is part
of BS1363.


Well non of the bog-standard extension leads I have here are shuttered.
No doubt they are manufactured in the Far East, but they are widely
on sale here from reputable sources and Supermarkets.
Ditto for socket doublers etc.
Ditto for ADSL filter/splitters.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%


I think that we are confusing two different items here! Mains sockets are
always shuttered, telephone sockets are normally shuttered except extension
cords. There is nothing dangerous about telephone line voltages - 50v DC
line voltage and about 75volts AC ringing voltage BUT both at very low
current, albeit ringing current can make you jump but it's certainly not
dangerous.

Peter


  #7  
Old May 3rd 09, 08:34 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Mark McIntyre
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 192
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

On 03/05/09 19:45, Peter Andrews wrote:

There is nothing dangerous about telephone line voltages - 50v DC


Supposed to be -48V but can be as much as -60V.

line voltage and about 75volts AC ringing voltage


I think in fact it can be anything between about 40 and 150VAC,
depending on the load on the line.

BUT both at very low
current, albeit ringing current can make you jump but it's certainly not
dangerous.


Its in the milliamp range isn't it? The ringer voltage is however high
enough that even with a 50mA current you can get a tickle. I guess if
you had a heart condition it might give you a big enough surprise to
cause palpitations.

Note also that the phone circuit can carry much higher voltages if the
exchange is struck by lightning.

--
Mark McIntyre

CLC FAQ http://c-faq.com/
CLC readme: http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt
  #8  
Old May 3rd 09, 09:23 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
David Woolley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

Mark McIntyre wrote:


Its in the milliamp range isn't it? The ringer voltage is however high
enough that even with a 50mA current you can get a tickle. I guess if
you had a heart condition it might give you a big enough surprise to
cause palpitations.


The 30mA used by earth leakage circuit breakers is a compromise. Even
30mA could kill you.

Note also that the phone circuit can carry much higher voltages if the
exchange is struck by lightning.


Or if there is a broken neutral on a PME mains distribution system.

  #9  
Old May 3rd 09, 09:48 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Old Codger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 363
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

Eddie wrote:
Is the dust really likely to cause problems for the electrical
contacts if I remove the dust shutter on my socket, leave the
socket empty for many months and then later put a plug n?


I am not aware of any dust shutters for UK sockets. *All* UK 13A
sockets have to be fitted with shutters that are released by the longer
earth pin on the associated plug. You would have to take the socket to
pieces to remove this shutter. Its purpose is safety, stopping little
fingers inserting foreign matter into the live or neutral socket. It
will not keep dust out.

Perhaps you are thinking of the plastic child safety covers that can be
purchased (plastic sheet with plastic pins attached matching 13A plug
pins). Again, these are intended to be safety covers, nothing to do
with preventing dust entering the socket, although they are likely to
reduce the dust that does enter. Some experts consider these next to
useless as a safety devices and some consider they actually reduce safety.

--
Old Codger
e-mail use reply to field

What matters in politics is not what happens, but what you can make
people believe has happened. [Janet Daley 27/8/2003]
  #10  
Old May 3rd 09, 10:04 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Abo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default How essential dust shutters on wall socket?

David Woolley wrote:
Mark McIntyre wrote:


Its in the milliamp range isn't it? The ringer voltage is however high
enough that even with a 50mA current you can get a tickle. I guess if
you had a heart condition it might give you a big enough surprise to
cause palpitations.


The 30mA used by earth leakage circuit breakers is a compromise. Even
30mA could kill you.


confession
I wish I'd known that earlier, I just wired in an extension for someone
and 'tested' the cable by sticking my tongue on the end...
/confession
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Test socket on Master Socket not working Kevin Cowans uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 14 November 15th 06 10:17 PM
ADSL/Master Socket Wall Plate miav uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 16 February 19th 06 04:43 PM
Wall Mount DG 834 Roger uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 11 April 15th 05 03:31 PM
Q : What's the max length for the cable from wall socket to router? IamTheWalrus uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 7 November 13th 04 10:31 AM
Installation closeness to wall socket!? Pete Stockdale uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 7 July 24th 03 08:38 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.