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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Wi-Fi reduced bitrate



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 15th 09, 07:43 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dave Farrance
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Wi-Fi reduced bitrate

With the increasing Wi-Fi congestion in my neighbourhood (all 802.11g it
seems), I've found that it's difficult to connect to my router if I take
my laptop into the garden. However, after fiddling with a few settings in
the laptop's WiFi driver, I found that reducing the maximum bitrate from
54M down to 11M allowed me to connect and communicate reliably. Why
should that be? Does reducing the bitrate actually widen each bit, or
does it just open up gaps in the transmission?

--
Dave Farrance
  #2  
Old July 15th 09, 08:23 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Wi-Fi reduced bitrate

In article , Dave Farrance
says...

With the increasing Wi-Fi congestion in my neighbourhood (all 802.11g it
seems), I've found that it's difficult to connect to my router if I take
my laptop into the garden. However, after fiddling with a few settings in
the laptop's WiFi driver, I found that reducing the maximum bitrate from
54M down to 11M allowed me to connect and communicate reliably. Why
should that be? Does reducing the bitrate actually widen each bit, or
does it just open up gaps in the transmission?


Allows more flexibility in error correction. TBH, it might be worth
finding another channel - 12 and 13 seem to be unused a lot mainly due
to the fact that kit set up for US channels can't pick them up.

--
Conor
www.notebooks-r-us.co.uk
I only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow isn't
looking good either. - Scott Adams
  #3  
Old July 20th 09, 11:56 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Clive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Wi-Fi reduced bitrate


"Conor" wrote in message
...
In article , Dave Farrance
says...

With the increasing Wi-Fi congestion in my neighbourhood (all 802.11g it
seems), I've found that it's difficult to connect to my router if I take
my laptop into the garden. However, after fiddling with a few settings
in
the laptop's WiFi driver, I found that reducing the maximum bitrate from
54M down to 11M allowed me to connect and communicate reliably. Why
should that be? Does reducing the bitrate actually widen each bit, or
does it just open up gaps in the transmission?


Allows more flexibility in error correction. TBH, it might be worth
finding another channel - 12 and 13 seem to be unused a lot mainly due
to the fact that kit set up for US channels can't pick them up.

--
Conor


CH12 & 13 are used in the UK and all equipment available to UK customers
can use those channels. I'm more amazed you don't seem to know why the
data rate and throughput drops in proportion to the signal strength!
Have a Google and come back to have it all explained to you.
I will give you a clue, bandwidth and modulation.


  #4  
Old July 21st 09, 02:23 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Anthony R. Gold
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 361
Default Wi-Fi reduced bitrate

On Mon, 20 Jul 2009 23:56:10 +0100, "Clive" wrote:


"Conor" wrote in message
Allows more flexibility in error correction. TBH, it might be worth
finding another channel - 12 and 13 seem to be unused a lot mainly due
to the fact that kit set up for US channels can't pick them up.

--
Conor


CH12 & 13 are used in the UK and all equipment available to UK customers
can use those channels.


That was obviously the key to his point.

I'm more amazed you don't seem to know why the
data rate and throughput drops in proportion to the signal strength!
Have a Google and come back to have it all explained to you.
I will give you a clue, bandwidth and modulation.


Bandwidth and/or modulation vary with signal strength? Thanks, I never
knew that. I had wrongly presumed that the issue was SNR, but you've set
me straight on that one.

Tony
  #5  
Old July 21st 09, 10:39 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Wi-Fi reduced bitrate

In article , Anthony R.
Gold says...

Bandwidth and/or modulation vary with signal strength? Thanks, I never
knew that. I had wrongly presumed that the issue was SNR, but you've set
me straight on that one.

It's just another pointless post by Clive.


--
Conor
www.notebooks-r-us.co.uk
I only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow isn't
looking good either. - Scott Adams
 




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