A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 7th 09, 01:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Jay
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 131
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

Sometimes it seems that BT can't win, whatever it does.

Internet punters are crying out for faster Internet access, however
residents of one of the lucky pilot areas for the technology have
complained that the new equipment is too big and ugly.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/07/bt_muswell_hill/:

----- Begin Quote -----

BT has been forced to put the brakes on an ongoing pilot of faster
broadband technology in north London because of protests from local
residents, who say its new roadside cabinets are too big and ugly.

Haringey Council has blocked BT from installing any further equipment
on the leafy streets of Muswell Hill until it rethinks the new network
of 1.8 metre-tall cabinets.

Muswell Hill is the first urban area in the country to benefit from
BT's 1.5bn commitment to replace the copper wiring that typically
connects local exchanges to roadside cabinets with fibre optics. The
new technology offers downstream broadband speeds of up to 40Mbit/s.

[...]

A BT spokeswoman said the new cabinets had to be larger because they
needed powered electronics to convert the light signals transmitted
over fibre optics to electrical signals to be transmitted to and from
homes, over copper. The current all-copper links from homes to
cabinets, to local exchanges, don't require such powered conversion.

----- End Quote -----
--
Martin Jay
  #2  
Old August 7th 09, 02:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big



"Martin Jay" wrote in message
...
Sometimes it seems that BT can't win, whatever it does.

Internet punters are crying out for faster Internet access, however
residents of one of the lucky pilot areas for the technology have
complained that the new equipment is too big and ugly.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/07/bt_muswell_hill/:

----- Begin Quote -----

BT has been forced to put the brakes on an ongoing pilot of faster
broadband technology in north London because of protests from local
residents, who say its new roadside cabinets are too big and ugly.

Haringey Council has blocked BT from installing any further equipment
on the leafy streets of Muswell Hill until it rethinks the new network
of 1.8 metre-tall cabinets.


Interesting that surprised BT haven't already requested planning permission
from the Council.

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our streets. We
have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever now and again one
sees in the pavement a large cover saying something like GPO or BT Telecoms.
So guess ours are underground for the present technology.
Only boxes are for Virgin Cable and around half the height of your new BT
ones. These VC ones are no higher than garden walls/fences so blend in,
these BT must look very ugly hope I not get one in front of my property!

--
Regards,
David

FREESAT HD as it is now it is a joke.

  #3  
Old August 7th 09, 03:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
IanB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
wrote:

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our streets. We
have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever now and again one
sees in the pavement a large cover saying something like GPO or BT Telecoms.
So guess ours are underground for the present technology.


Nope.

They are underground joint boxes or, very occasionally, deeper
manholes. Cables from various locations are jointed together in them
and build the local network. Opening/closing a joint can be a time
consuming task - albeit a lot easier than in the old days, hot solder
and moleskin when I was a lad :-)

Green boxes are cross connection points where pairs heading back
towards the exchange (Exchange side or E-Side) can _easily_ be cross
connected to pairs heading towards the dp/customer (Distribution side
or D-Side).

You will have a cabinet somewhere in your location, and your pair will
almost certainly go through one. The possible distance from you
depends on the locality but could be a Km or more.

Ian
--
The From address is valid
  #4  
Old August 7th 09, 04:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

"IanB" wrote in message
news:[email protected] eu...
On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
wrote:

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our streets.
We
have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever now and again one
sees in the pavement a large cover saying something like GPO or BT
Telecoms.
So guess ours are underground for the present technology.


Nope.

They are underground joint boxes or, very occasionally, deeper
manholes. Cables from various locations are jointed together in them
and build the local network. Opening/closing a joint can be a time
consuming task - albeit a lot easier than in the old days, hot solder
and moleskin when I was a lad :-)

Green boxes are cross connection points where pairs heading back
towards the exchange (Exchange side or E-Side) can _easily_ be cross
connected to pairs heading towards the dp/customer (Distribution side
or D-Side).

You will have a cabinet somewhere in your location, and your pair will
almost certainly go through one. The possible distance from you
depends on the locality but could be a Km or more.


So why don't they have a box which is half underground and half overground
with all the extra "powered conversion stuff" under and the part that the
engineers need to access on top?

--
Max Demian


  #5  
Old August 7th 09, 04:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Pete Zahut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

Max Demian wrote:
"IanB" wrote in message
news:[email protected] eu...
On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
wrote:

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our
streets. We
have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever now and
again one sees in the pavement a large cover saying something like
GPO or BT Telecoms.
So guess ours are underground for the present technology.


Nope.

They are underground joint boxes or, very occasionally, deeper
manholes. Cables from various locations are jointed together in them
and build the local network. Opening/closing a joint can be a time
consuming task - albeit a lot easier than in the old days, hot solder
and moleskin when I was a lad :-)

Green boxes are cross connection points where pairs heading back
towards the exchange (Exchange side or E-Side) can _easily_ be cross
connected to pairs heading towards the dp/customer (Distribution side
or D-Side).

You will have a cabinet somewhere in your location, and your pair
will almost certainly go through one. The possible distance from you
depends on the locality but could be a Km or more.


So why don't they have a box which is half underground and half
overground with all the extra "powered conversion stuff" under and
the part that the engineers need to access on top?


Presumably the powered stuff would generate heat but the
earth/soil/concrete/whatever around it would be cold, thereby causing a lot
of condensation - not good for electronics stuff.


  #6  
Old August 7th 09, 04:33 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Pete Zahut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

IanB wrote:
On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
wrote:

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our
streets. We have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever
now and again one sees in the pavement a large cover saying
something like GPO or BT Telecoms. So guess ours are underground for
the present technology.


Nope.

They are underground joint boxes or, very occasionally, deeper
manholes. Cables from various locations are jointed together in them
and build the local network. Opening/closing a joint can be a time
consuming task - albeit a lot easier than in the old days, hot solder
and moleskin when I was a lad :-)

Green boxes are cross connection points where pairs heading back
towards the exchange (Exchange side or E-Side) can _easily_ be cross
connected to pairs heading towards the dp/customer (Distribution side
or D-Side).

You will have a cabinet somewhere in your location, and your pair will
almost certainly go through one. The possible distance from you
depends on the locality but could be a Km or more.


And here's what happens when someone torches a jointing cabinet:

http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q...oo/cab19_1.jpg

and

http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q...oo/cab19_2.jpg

I was on the night shift for this one - too many bosses around panicking
during the day )


  #7  
Old August 7th 09, 04:56 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin D. Pay
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 27
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big

On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
mangled uncounted electrons thus:



"Martin Jay" wrote in message
...
Sometimes it seems that BT can't win, whatever it does.

Internet punters are crying out for faster Internet access, however
residents of one of the lucky pilot areas for the technology have
complained that the new equipment is too big and ugly.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/07/bt_muswell_hill/:

----- Begin Quote -----

BT has been forced to put the brakes on an ongoing pilot of faster
broadband technology in north London because of protests from local
residents, who say its new roadside cabinets are too big and ugly.

Haringey Council has blocked BT from installing any further equipment
on the leafy streets of Muswell Hill until it rethinks the new network
of 1.8 metre-tall cabinets.


I wonder what power(s) the Council is exercising to do this (see
below)?

pauses to read Register article

Ah, it's a Conservation Area. Specific rules, nothing to do with
planning permission per se...

Interesting that surprised BT haven't already requested planning permission
from the Council.


BT don't need planning permission for works (including the
installation of above-ground kit) in the public highway (road or
footpath); they're exempt under the relevant Telecommunications
Act. They are subject to the various public utilities regulations
and undertakings, but these are mostly about advising the local
authority beforehand if they're going to make holes/trenches in
the highway and about proper restoration of said holes/trenches
afterwards.

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our streets. We
have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever now and again one
sees in the pavement a large cover saying something like GPO or BT Telecoms.
So guess ours are underground for the present technology.
Only boxes are for Virgin Cable and around half the height of your new BT
ones. These VC ones are no higher than garden walls/fences so blend in,
these BT must look very ugly hope I not get one in front of my property!


We have a bunch of ex-Telewest boxes at the end of our road. And
we keep getting the leaflets through the post about Virgin's
wonderful TV/telephone/internet service...

Martin D. Pay
Who's been told by a friend who has it that Virgin's cable
broadband service is actually pretty good...
  #8  
Old August 7th 09, 06:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 601
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big


"Pete Zahut" [email protected] wrote in message
...
IanB wrote:
On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 13:20:55 +0100, "David"
wrote:

Anyway your post as caused me to think what we have here on our
streets. We have no BT boxes with the present technology, but ever
now and again one sees in the pavement a large cover saying
something like GPO or BT Telecoms. So guess ours are underground for
the present technology.


Nope.

They are underground joint boxes or, very occasionally, deeper
manholes. Cables from various locations are jointed together in them
and build the local network. Opening/closing a joint can be a time
consuming task - albeit a lot easier than in the old days, hot solder
and moleskin when I was a lad :-)

Green boxes are cross connection points where pairs heading back
towards the exchange (Exchange side or E-Side) can _easily_ be cross
connected to pairs heading towards the dp/customer (Distribution side
or D-Side).

You will have a cabinet somewhere in your location, and your pair will
almost certainly go through one. The possible distance from you
depends on the locality but could be a Km or more.


And here's what happens when someone torches a jointing cabinet:

http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q...oo/cab19_1.jpg

and

http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q...oo/cab19_2.jpg

I was on the night shift for this one - too many bosses around panicking
during the day )


'Kinell! How did they manage that? An oxy-acetylene torch?

George


  #9  
Old August 7th 09, 08:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ato_Zee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big


So why don't they have a box which is half underground and half overground
with all the extra "powered conversion stuff" under and the part that the
engineers need to access on top?


Question is how much power do they need, considering the have a
copper route back to the exchange?
  #10  
Old August 7th 09, 08:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 601
Default Council says fibre to the curb equipment too big


"Ato_Zee" wrote in message
...

So why don't they have a box which is half underground and half
overground
with all the extra "powered conversion stuff" under and the part that the
engineers need to access on top?


Question is how much power do they need, considering the have a
copper route back to the exchange?


Erm - don't they intend to convert that to fibre also?


 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
VOTE SDLP and save yourself 500 on the council tax. Donald McTrevor uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 241 May 13th 05 09:18 PM
VOTE SDLP and save yourself 500 on the council tax. Paul Cummins uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 0 May 5th 05 07:38 PM
BB on fibre Charlotte uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 6 June 26th 04 01:21 AM
NEWS MIDDLESBROUGH COUNCIL COVERUP! [email protected] uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 4 October 5th 03 05:47 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.