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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Powerline networking



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 17th 09, 12:13 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jef Roe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Powerline networking

Am I missing something on this networking principle...

Typically a kit contains one 14Mbps plug and one 85Mbps plug. Which to me
implies I will be choked to 14Mbps.

Why does it get so much praise when this is 1/4 of my wireless system.


  #2  
Old October 17th 09, 12:26 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Powerline networking

In article , Jef Roe says...

Am I missing something on this networking principle...

Typically a kit contains one 14Mbps plug and one 85Mbps plug. Which to me
implies I will be choked to 14Mbps.

Why does it get so much praise when this is 1/4 of my wireless system.


Because it allows stupid people to connect their computer upstairs to
the hub downstairs. It also allows anyone with a HF receiver within a
500 yard radius to monitor the network traffic as well but that
"feature" isn't advertised.

--
Conor
www.notebooks-r-us.co.uk

I'm not prejudiced. I hate everybody equally.
  #3  
Old October 17th 09, 02:55 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
LR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Powerline networking

On 17/10/2009 12:13, Jef Roe wrote:
Am I missing something on this networking principle...

Typically a kit contains one 14Mbps plug and one 85Mbps plug. Which to me
implies I will be choked to 14Mbps.

Why does it get so much praise when this is 1/4 of my wireless system.


They do not come as a kit containing 1x14Mbs unit and 1x85Mbs unit, they
are usually matched. Since 2007 there has been HomeplugAV which will
give you a Data throughput of 70-80Mbps for it's "transfer rate" of
200Mbs. While the AV devices can exist on the same AC wiring as the
14Mbs and 85Mbs units they are unable to communicate with them.
  #4  
Old October 17th 09, 03:03 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jef Roe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Powerline networking


They do not come as a kit containing 1x14Mbs unit and 1x85Mbs unit, they
are usually matched.



uhmmm


http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/p...RLINETWIN.html



  #5  
Old October 17th 09, 03:08 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
LR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Powerline networking

On 17/10/2009 12:26, Conor wrote:
It also allows anyone with a HF receiver within a
500 yard radius to monitor the network traffic as well but that
"feature" isn't advertised.

Do you have a ref for this. Given that the bandwidth used by most HF
receivers is small compared to the Band used by Homeplug and the fact
that HomeplugAV does have AES encryption I think it is highly unlikely
for anything meaningful to be obtained, the modulation used is also
different.
A HF receiver may be tuned to one of the bands and may be subject to
interference but the newer homeplug devices have notch filters include
to reduce signal levels on some of the bands to try and reduce this.
see para 4.3
http://www.intellon.com/pdfs/whitepaper_PLCPerformanceTesting.pdf
  #6  
Old October 17th 09, 03:12 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
LR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Powerline networking

On 17/10/2009 15:03, Jef Roe wrote:
They do not come as a kit containing 1x14Mbs unit and 1x85Mbs unit, they
are usually matched.



uhmmm


http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/p...RLINETWIN.html



The spec merely says that it supports the homeplug1.0 standard.
"Standard Support HomePlug 1.0 (14Mbps) & 1.0 Turbo (85Mbps)"
You would get 2x85Mbs units.
  #7  
Old October 17th 09, 03:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Powerline networking

In article , LR says...

On 17/10/2009 12:26, Conor wrote:
It also allows anyone with a HF receiver within a
500 yard radius to monitor the network traffic as well but that
"feature" isn't advertised.

Do you have a ref for this.


Yes.
Given that the bandwidth used by most HF
receivers is small compared to the Band used by Homeplug and the fact
that HomeplugAV does have AES encryption I think it is highly unlikely
for anything meaningful to be obtained, the modulation used is also
different.
A HF receiver may be tuned to one of the bands and may be subject to
interference


No - clear signal.

but the newer homeplug devices have notch filters include
to reduce signal levels on some of the bands to try and reduce this.
see para 4.3


BWAHAHA.

I've put in 3 complaints to Ofcom myself about PLT interference on
amateur radio bands.


--
Conor
www.notebooks-r-us.co.uk

I'm not prejudiced. I hate everybody equally.
  #8  
Old October 17th 09, 03:39 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default Powerline networking

On Sat, 17 Oct 2009 15:36:09 +0100
Conor wrote:

In article , LR says...


but the newer homeplug devices have notch filters include
to reduce signal levels on some of the bands to try and reduce this.
see para 4.3


BWAHAHA.

I've put in 3 complaints to Ofcom myself about PLT interference on
amateur radio bands.


I noticed this a couple of weeks back
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/10/01/rsgb_ofcom/

  #9  
Old October 17th 09, 03:40 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
LR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Powerline networking

On 17/10/2009 15:36, Conor wrote:
In , LR says...

On 17/10/2009 12:26, Conor wrote:
It also allows anyone with a HF receiver within a
500 yard radius to monitor the network traffic as well but that
"feature" isn't advertised.

Do you have a ref for this.


Yes.

So where is it?
Given that the bandwidth used by most HF
receivers is small compared to the Band used by Homeplug and the fact
that HomeplugAV does have AES encryption I think it is highly unlikely
for anything meaningful to be obtained, the modulation used is also
different.
A HF receiver may be tuned to one of the bands and may be subject to
interference


No - clear signal.

So what type of signal is it?

but the newer homeplug devices have notch filters include
to reduce signal levels on some of the bands to try and reduce this.
see para 4.3


BWAHAHA.

I've put in 3 complaints to Ofcom myself about PLT interference on
amateur radio bands.


Did the devices have notch filters or not? What was Ofcoms response?
  #10  
Old October 17th 09, 04:06 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jef Roe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Powerline networking


"LR" wrote in message
...
On 17/10/2009 15:03, Jef Roe wrote:
They do not come as a kit containing 1x14Mbs unit and 1x85Mbs unit, they
are usually matched.



uhmmm


http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/p...RLINETWIN.html



The spec merely says that it supports the homeplug1.0 standard.
"Standard Support HomePlug 1.0 (14Mbps) & 1.0 Turbo (85Mbps)"
You would get 2x85Mbs units.


Ah OK, perhaps the wording Twin Pack in the title could be made a little
more explicit.


 




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