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Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 7th 10, 10:14 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 525
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11483008

"His proposal, presented at the International Security Solutions
Europe (ISSE) Conference in Berlin, Germany, is for all computers to
have a "health certificate" to prove that it is uninfected before it
connects to the net."

Scott Charney says:
"Although the conditions to be checked may change over time, current
experience suggests that such health checks should ensure that
software patches are applied, a firewall is installed and configured
correctly, an antivirus program with current signatures is running,
and the machine is not currently infected with known malware," he
wrote in the accompanying paper."

He either is completely unable to understand the problem or this is
more about ensuring a total monopoly for Microsoft. I'd guess the
latter.
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.

  #2  
Old October 7th 10, 10:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rupert Moss-Eccardt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate beforebeing allowed to connect to the net.

Mark wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11483008

"His proposal, presented at the International Security Solutions
Europe (ISSE) Conference in Berlin, Germany, is for all computers to
have a "health certificate" to prove that it is uninfected before it
connects to the net."

Scott Charney says:
"Although the conditions to be checked may change over time, current
experience suggests that such health checks should ensure that
software patches are applied, a firewall is installed and configured
correctly, an antivirus program with current signatures is running,
and the machine is not currently infected with known malware," he
wrote in the accompanying paper."

He either is completely unable to understand the problem or this is
more about ensuring a total monopoly for Microsoft. I'd guess the
latter.


This approach of 'posture checking' is already being used for hundreds
of thousands of machines used for remote access to corporate systems.

The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.



  #3  
Old October 7th 10, 01:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
fred
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 175
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.

In article , Mark
writes
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11483008

"His proposal, presented at the International Security Solutions
Europe (ISSE) Conference in Berlin, Germany, is for all computers to
have a "health certificate" to prove that it is uninfected before it
connects to the net."

Scott Charney says:
"Although the conditions to be checked may change over time, current
experience suggests that such health checks should ensure that
software patches are applied, a firewall is installed and configured
correctly, an antivirus program with current signatures is running,
and the machine is not currently infected with known malware," he
wrote in the accompanying paper."

He either is completely unable to understand the problem or this is
more about ensuring a total monopoly for Microsoft. I'd guess the
latter.


Presumably machines with bug laden OSs that are easily susceptible to
bot net recruitment would be barred from connection? . . . . oh, wait a
minute . . . . .
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's ********
  #4  
Old October 7th 10, 02:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Nigel Wade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate beforebeing allowed to connect to the net.

On 07/10/10 10:14, Mark wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11483008

"His proposal, presented at the International Security Solutions
Europe (ISSE) Conference in Berlin, Germany, is for all computers to
have a "health certificate" to prove that it is uninfected before it
connects to the net."

Scott Charney says:
"Although the conditions to be checked may change over time, current
experience suggests that such health checks should ensure that
software patches are applied, a firewall is installed and configured
correctly, an antivirus program with current signatures is running,
and the machine is not currently infected with known malware," he
wrote in the accompanying paper."

He either is completely unable to understand the problem or this is
more about ensuring a total monopoly for Microsoft. I'd guess the
latter.


Presumably, under such a scheme, the highest grade "health certificate"
would be "certified Microsoft-free".

--
Nigel Wade

  #5  
Old October 8th 10, 06:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
bod43
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 105
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate beforebeing allowed to connect to the net.

On 7 Oct, 13:18, fred wrote:

Presumably machines with bug laden OSs that are easily susceptible to
bot net recruitment would be barred from connection? . . . . oh, wait a
minute . . . . .


:-)))


  #6  
Old October 12th 10, 11:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris Davies
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 444
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.

Rupert Moss-Eccardt wrote:
The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.


The cost of ensuring compliance raises the financial barrier to
potentially prohibitive levels for non-commercial operating systems.

Chris
  #7  
Old October 13th 10, 09:59 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 525
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.

On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 23:13:33 +0100, Chris Davies
wrote:

Rupert Moss-Eccardt wrote:
The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.


The cost of ensuring compliance raises the financial barrier to
potentially prohibitive levels for non-commercial operating systems.


And the things needed to get compliance may not even be available or
needed on non-windows OSs (virus checkers, software firewalls etc).
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.

  #8  
Old October 13th 10, 01:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rupert Moss-Eccardt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate beforebeing allowed to connect to the net.

Mark wrote:
On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 23:13:33 +0100, Chris Davies
wrote:

Rupert wrote:
The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.


The cost of ensuring compliance raises the financial barrier to
potentially prohibitive levels for non-commercial operating systems.


And the things needed to get compliance may not even be available or
needed on non-windows OSs (virus checkers, software firewalls etc).


False. Except for some very specialised OS's.
Can you give me an example of the sort of OS you had in mind?



  #9  
Old October 13th 10, 01:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rupert Moss-Eccardt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate beforebeing allowed to connect to the net.

Chris Davies wrote:
Rupert wrote:
The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.


The cost of ensuring compliance raises the financial barrier to
potentially prohibitive levels for non-commercial operating systems.


Isn't that self-defining?

However, I've seen posture-checking systems happily work with a number
of Linux distros but then that has been in a relatively small corporate
network. The Ubuntu's of this world will probably cope but some others
may not. But I don't see that as a reason to not try to make things
better generally.

  #10  
Old October 13th 10, 02:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 525
Default Microsoft proposes all PCs have a "health" certificate before being allowed to connect to the net.

On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 13:42:21 +0100, Rupert Moss-Eccardt
wrote:

Mark wrote:
On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 23:13:33 +0100, Chris Davies
wrote:

Rupert wrote:
The Trusted Computing people have developed a suitable standard to embed
this in the BIOS (or later equivalents) so I don't see what 'the
problem' is.

The cost of ensuring compliance raises the financial barrier to
potentially prohibitive levels for non-commercial operating systems.


And the things needed to get compliance may not even be available or
needed on non-windows OSs (virus checkers, software firewalls etc).


False. Except for some very specialised OS's.


Rubbish. No computer needs a software firewall. A separate firewall
should be used instead.

--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.

 




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