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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 24th 10, 07:21 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jeff Gaines
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 401
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together


I have moved to a house where getting a wire from my modem/router will be
a pain so I'm thinking of going wireless. However I will want a wired
connection to my NAS and another PC. I also want to be able to use a
wireless connection from my laptop to the main PC.

Many moons ago I used 2 wired connections so that I cold benefit from a 1
Gb/s speed, if I remember correctly (and I may not be) I bridged the 2
connections.

Is this the way to do it? Should both the wired and wireless IP addresses
be in the same range?

--
Those are my principles Ė and if you donít like them, well, I have others.
(Groucho Marx)
  #2  
Old October 24th 10, 07:31 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Bernard Peek
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Posts: 202
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On 24/10/10 19:21, Jeff Gaines wrote:

Should both the wired and wireless IP
addresses be in the same range?


Usually yes.


--
Bernard Peek

  #3  
Old October 25th 10, 11:08 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Daniel James
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Posts: 41
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

In article , Jeff Gaines wrote:
I have moved to a house where getting a wire from my modem/router will

be
a pain so I'm thinking of going wireless. However I will want a wired
connection to my NAS and another PC. I also want to be able to use a
wireless connection from my laptop to the main PC.


Perfectly sensible -- and standard -- arrangement.

Many moons ago I used 2 wired connections so that I cold benefit from
a 1 Gb/s speed, if I remember correctly (and I may not be) I bridged
the 2 connections.


That's quite different. IIUC you had then two connections between the
same two boxes. What you're talking about now is having one wired
connection between PC1 and the router and another (wireless) connection
between PC2 and the router. There's really no difference, once you get
up to the IP levels of the stack, between wired and wireless ... it's
just multiple clients talking to the same router.

[If you wanted the wired PCs to use wireless as well to get a little
extra bandwidth THAT would be more like your setup of many moons ago.]

Should both the wired and wireless IP addresses be in the same range?


Assuming you want the convenience of having all the boxes on the same
subnet, yes. You can put them on different subnets if you want, just as
you could if all the connections were wired.

If you use a standard off-the-shelf wired/wireless router appliance
it'll probably just allocate IPs using DHCP, and the wired and wireless
connections will get addresses from the same pool.

If you're doing something else you should probably tell us what?

Cheers,
Daniel.


  #4  
Old October 25th 10, 12:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jeff Gaines
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Posts: 401
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On 25/10/2010 in message Daniel James
wrote:

If you're doing something else you should probably tell us what?


Many thanks, Daniel - a little bit different:

Wired & wireless modem/router connected to 'phone line.
PC1 connects to modem/router via wireless.
PC1 also connects to NAS and PC2 using a wired connection.
Laptop connects to PC1 wirelessly so I can use PC1 via remote desktop
connection.

It doesn't use the wired connection to modem/router at all, but it's on
the kit.

I'm trying to visualise the laptop controlling PC1 (for news, mail,
browsing) and PC1 going to the Internet using a wireless connection
without 'clashing' with its wireless connection to the laptop. It is
making my brain hurt though!

Also trying to visualise using PC2 and needing to get something from the
Internet when it would have to go via PC1.

I'm not sure if I have made it clearer or worse now?

--
Jeff Gaines Dorset UK
You can't tell which way the train went by looking at the tracks
  #5  
Old October 25th 10, 02:10 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dave Saville
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Posts: 138
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 11:36:15 UTC, "Jeff Gaines"
wrote:

On 25/10/2010 in message Daniel James
wrote:

If you're doing something else you should probably tell us what?


Many thanks, Daniel - a little bit different:

Wired & wireless modem/router connected to 'phone line.
PC1 connects to modem/router via wireless.
PC1 also connects to NAS and PC2 using a wired connection.
Laptop connects to PC1 wirelessly so I can use PC1 via remote desktop
connection.

It doesn't use the wired connection to modem/router at all, but it's on
the kit.

I'm trying to visualise the laptop controlling PC1 (for news, mail,
browsing) and PC1 going to the Internet using a wireless connection
without 'clashing' with its wireless connection to the laptop. It is
making my brain hurt though!

Also trying to visualise using PC2 and needing to get something from the
Internet when it would have to go via PC1.

I'm not sure if I have made it clearer or worse now?


Why not just have everything go wired or wifi via the router?
--
Regards
Dave Saville
  #6  
Old October 25th 10, 04:57 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Anthony R. Gold
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Posts: 361
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 11:08:59 +0100, Daniel James wrote:

In article , Jeff Gaines wrote:

Should both the wired and wireless IP addresses be in the same range?


Assuming you want the convenience of having all the boxes on the same
subnet, yes.


What other option is possible if they all need WAN access? The gateway's
single IP address and subnet mask would prevent any other configuration.

You can put them on different subnets if you want, just as
you could if all the connections were wired.


But then they won't all have access to the Internet.

Tony
  #7  
Old October 26th 10, 08:26 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Alex Fraser
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Posts: 553
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On 24/10/2010 19:21, Jeff Gaines wrote:
I have moved to a house where getting a wire from my modem/router will
be a pain so I'm thinking of going wireless. However I will want a wired
connection to my NAS and another PC. I also want to be able to use a
wireless connection from my laptop to the main PC.

Many moons ago I used 2 wired connections so that I cold benefit from a
1 Gb/s speed, if I remember correctly (and I may not be) I bridged the 2
connections.

Is this the way to do it? Should both the wired and wireless IP
addresses be in the same range?


Bridging two connections where one of the is wireless used to sometimes
be problematic - not sure if that's still true. That said, it's the
simplest solution though so worth a try. I'd suggest static IP
configuration for PC2 and the NAS (address in the same range as the
router but outside the DHCP range, same subnet mask, and router as
default gateway and DNS server). If the bridge works, everything will be
able to reach everything else, and the Internet, as long as PC1 is on.

The most sensible alternative I can see is to use a dedicated bridge.
This can be done using a pair of access points, one wired to the router
and the other wired to a switch connected to PC1, PC2 and the NAS; or a
single wireless device acting as a wireless client, again wired to a
switch. Either would remove the dependency of PC1 being on. The latter
option is preferable but I'm not sure what devices support it - best bet
is probably a wireless router with non-standard firmware.

It may be possible to use normal (non-NAT) IP routing to achieve the
same universal reachability, depending on the router (if you want
Internet access from PC2 or the NAS) and whether PC1 can be persuaded to
route between the wireless and wired networks.

Finally, it may be possible to share the wireless connection on PC1,
using NAT. This should work with any router, and PC2 and the NAS would
be able to reach the Internet, but nothing on the wireless side of PC1
would be able to reach PC2 or the NAS without configuring port
forwarding on PC1.

Alex
  #8  
Old October 26th 10, 09:04 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jeff Gaines
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 401
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

On 26/10/2010 in message Alex
Fraser wrote:

[snipped]

Many thanks, Alex - I'm sure it was you who talked me through my original
bridged setup some years back.

I am in my new house with a plate, knife & fork, Futon and 12 gallons of
paint plus the laptop connected via BTFON so I can't experiment yet. If I
can find a way to run a cable while I'm decorating I will but it looks
problematic ATM.

--
Jeff Gaines Dorset UK
All those who believe in psychokinesis raise my hand.
  #9  
Old October 27th 10, 11:29 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Daniel James
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

In article , Anthony R.
Gold wrote:
[I wrote]
You can put them on different subnets if you want, just as
you could if all the connections were wired.


But then they won't all have access to the Internet.


That's true -- good point -- maybe I should have assumed the unwritten
requirement that all the PCs should have internet access, but I didn't.

Cheers,
Daniel.


  #10  
Old October 27th 10, 11:29 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Daniel James
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Using Wireless and Wired Networks Together

In article , Jeff Gaines wrote:
Many thanks, Daniel - a little bit different:

Wired & wireless modem/router connected to 'phone line.
PC1 connects to modem/router via wireless.
PC1 also connects to NAS and PC2 using a wired connection.
Laptop connects to PC1 wirelessly so I can use PC1 via remote desktop
connection.


Why?

Why not let PC1 connect to the router (by wire or wireless), PC2 connect
to the router (wired or wireless), laptop connect to the router (wired
or wireless), and NAS connect to the router (wired or wireless).

That way everything can connect to everything else, and everything can
connect to the internet. That may not be what you want, but if so I
don't know what it is that you do want ...

In all cases you should prefer wired over wireless, though wireless will
be fine in places that you don't want to run wires to.

Hmm ...

There is one thing I hadn't though of ... if one of your pieces of kit
doesn't have wireless and you don't want to run cable to it from the
router but are prepared to run cable to it from one of the other boxes
you wouldn't be able to do quite what I've described. In that case I'd
suggest getting a wireless hub that can connect wirelessly to the router
and can provide wired access for devices local to it. They're readily
and cheaply available (around £35 last time I looked, probably less
now).

I'm trying to visualise the laptop controlling PC1 (for news, mail,
browsing) and PC1 going to the Internet using a wireless connection
without 'clashing' with its wireless connection to the laptop. It is
making my brain hurt though!


What do you mean by "controlling", here?

I'd be surprised if your laptop isn't connecting to PC1 via the router
already (unless PC1 has two wireless cards). PC1 has one wireless
connection to the router, the router then routes packets either to the
laptop or to the internet.

If PC1 has two wireless NICs it could be set up to communicate with the
laptop from one NIC and with the router from the other (on different
subnets) ... I doubt that's what you're doing and I'd advise against it
anyway.

I'm not sure if I have made it clearer or worse now?


smile You have made it clear that the picture is not as
straightforward as it may have seemed, but the picture itself is now
less clear.

--
Cheers,
Daniel.



 




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