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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

FTTC predicted speeds



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 25th 10, 10:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Gareth
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Posts: 49
Default FTTC predicted speeds

I currently get a 3.7 Mbps ADSL synch rate with a BRAS of 3 Mbps.

The BT ADSL checker suggests that the maximum BRAS I can get on my line is 2
Mbps.

It says that I can expect a FTTC speed of 28 Mbps upstream.

What I don't understand is this: it predicts that some people who I know and
who get a better current ADSL synch rate than me (predicted and actual) will
get a lower FTTC connection than I will get.

Is this just poor prediction or is there a quality of FTTC that can boost
poor current ADSL connections above good current connections?

  #2  
Old November 25th 10, 10:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Crosland
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Posts: 1,463
Default FTTC predicted speeds

"Gareth" wrote in message
...
I currently get a 3.7 Mbps ADSL synch rate with a BRAS of 3 Mbps.

The BT ADSL checker suggests that the maximum BRAS I can get on my line is
2 Mbps.

It says that I can expect a FTTC speed of 28 Mbps upstream.

What I don't understand is this: it predicts that some people who I know
and who get a better current ADSL synch rate than me (predicted and
actual) will get a lower FTTC connection than I will get.

Is this just poor prediction or is there a quality of FTTC that can boost
poor current ADSL connections above good current connections?



The speed with FTTC depends on how close you are to the cabinet. Your
current speed depends on how far you are from the exchange. So you might be
several miles from the exchange but only a short distance from the cabinet.
So you could easily get a higher speed that someone closer to the exchange
but further from the cabinet that serves them.


Peter Crosland


  #3  
Old November 26th 10, 12:39 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Tobin
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Posts: 276
Default FTTC predicted speeds

In article ,
Peter Crosland wrote:

The speed with FTTC depends on how close you are to the cabinet.


Where are these cabinets? All the phone lines around here go to
poles and then appear to disappear into the ground. Do they
install the cabinets when an exchange is enabled for FTTC, or are
they lurking in the bushes somewhere?

-- Richard
  #4  
Old November 26th 10, 07:08 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David
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Posts: 498
Default FTTC predicted speeds



"Richard Tobin" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Peter Crosland wrote:

The speed with FTTC depends on how close you are to the cabinet.


Where are these cabinets? All the phone lines around here go to
poles and then appear to disappear into the ground. Do they
install the cabinets when an exchange is enabled for FTTC, or are
they lurking in the bushes somewhere?


In my area can't get anyone to say when FTTC will happen and I'm in a City
and not out in the middle of no where, the BT/Open Reach voting site which I
went to has 8 people voting, now 9 because of mine. Found out by accident
of this vote, think it a secret, from what I gather exchanges with most
votes get FTTC first.
I'm like you what ever is the alternative to cabinets here is under a large
GPO concrete double man hole cover.
Virgin Media have placed their cabinets on the pavements against garden
walls, probably BT will do the same.

I'm hoping that Fibre will replace the copper as I asked the Open Reach man
where my copper wire went I found out it goes in the opposite direction to
where the exchange is and is over twice the length than the crow flies to
the exchange
Regards
David

  #5  
Old November 26th 10, 07:55 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Crosland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,463
Default FTTC predicted speeds

"Richard Tobin" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Peter Crosland wrote:

The speed with FTTC depends on how close you are to the cabinet.


Where are these cabinets? All the phone lines around here go to
poles and then appear to disappear into the ground. Do they
install the cabinets when an exchange is enabled for FTTC, or are
they lurking in the bushes somewhere?



BT Cabinets can be above or below ground. For example my line goes on poles
for about three hundred metres and then goes underground to a cabinet above
ground some 500 metres further away. BT/Openreach cabinets are usually dark
green and usually against a wall. FTTC will require the installation of new,
larger cabinets, that will be easier to spot. Once you start looking you
will see them all over the place particularly in rural areas.


Peter Crosland


  #6  
Old November 26th 10, 08:08 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Angus Robertson - Magenta Systems Ltd
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Posts: 123
Default FTTC predicted speeds

In article ,
(Richard Tobin) wrote:

The speed with FTTC depends on how close you are to the cabinet.


Where are these cabinets? All the phone lines around here go to
poles and then appear to disappear into the ground.


All local cables get concentrated at local street cabinets, where they the
much larger cables from the exchange terminate. When FTTC is installed, BT
installs a second usually much larger cabinet a few feet away from the
original cabinet.

The FTTC cabinet is different to usual cabinets, with ventilation holes and
an electricity warning sticker since it will contain powered equipment, the
original cabinets are unpowered.

BT has to get planning permission for most new cabinets in the street, you
should be able to search your local council web site for any applications
from 'Openreach - NGA FTTC Planning' or Goggle 'Siting of telecommunication
cabinet' and your town and you should find the locations of any new planned
FTTC cabinets.

BT has just installed two new FTTC cabinets in my area of East Croydon a
few hundred yards away, unfortunately the streets are on a different
exchange to mine so I have to wait another year.

Angus

  #7  
Old November 26th 10, 08:29 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
IanB
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Posts: 12
Default FTTC predicted speeds

On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 07:55:17 -0000, "Peter Crosland"
wrote:

BT Cabinets can be above or below ground.


I've never heard of underground cabinets before? Are you sure that
you are not getting confused with pavement joint boxes or underground
jointing chambers.

The difference is that in a cabinet all the wires in the exchange
side/ local side cables are exposed, so that every Tom, Dick or Harry
can work on them easily.

It a joint box / jointing chamber (and the cable chamber in the
exchange) there are never any loose wires. All the cables are sealed
in water and air tight sleeves, and it is a much bigger job to get
into them and make changes.

Ian
--
The From and ReplyTo addresses are valid
  #8  
Old November 26th 10, 09:55 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default FTTC predicted speeds



"IanB" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 07:55:17 -0000, "Peter Crosland"
wrote:

BT Cabinets can be above or below ground.


I've never heard of underground cabinets before? Are you sure that
you are not getting confused with pavement joint boxes or underground
jointing chambers.

The difference is that in a cabinet all the wires in the exchange
side/ local side cables are exposed, so that every Tom, Dick or Harry
can work on them easily.

It a joint box / jointing chamber (and the cable chamber in the
exchange) there are never any loose wires. All the cables are sealed
in water and air tight sleeves, and it is a much bigger job to get
into them and make changes.

Thanks for that explanation of what was used before cabinets came along on
top of the ground.
In my case these underground places are very common the concrete cover is
about 3 ft x 2 ft and at one road junction on the estate is a double one.
Can one assume the new cabinets will be on the ground adjacent to these
underground connection places.
VM have far less cabinets than the GPO covers.
Regards
David

  #9  
Old November 26th 10, 10:36 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
IanB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default FTTC predicted speeds

On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 09:55:30 -0000, "David"
wrote:

Thanks for that explanation of what was used before cabinets came along on
top of the ground.


I think you may have misunderstood; cabinets and jointing places are
still both used in the network.

A cabinet is a cross-connection point. Where pairs coming from the
exchange can _easily_ by connected to pairs heading towards the
customer.

Jointing places are used for more permanent changes.

Very simplified; say you have a large (2000 pair or so) cable coming
from the exchange. At some point this is split and, say, 4 500 pair
cables head off in different directions. Each of those may end up in
a cabinet, or may be split (at different places along the route
perhaps) into further 100 pair cables. Some of those 100 pairs may go
to other cabinets, others may be split into 20 pairs that go to DPs
(up poles for example).

The same thing happens the other side of the cabinet. A 100 pair may
head off from the cabinet into a housing estate where it is split into
smaller cables that end up at DPs.

Each of the "splits" mentioned above needs a watertight joint. These
are located either in large chambers, smaller footway/road boxes or,
in many cases, are just buried under verges.

If you expand the above scenario many fold, exchanges can have 10s of
large cables leaving them, then you can see why there are so many
joint places around.

Ian
--
The From and ReplyTo addresses are valid
  #10  
Old November 26th 10, 10:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default FTTC predicted speeds



"IanB" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 09:55:30 -0000, "David"
wrote:

Thanks for that explanation of what was used before cabinets came along on
top of the ground.


I think you may have misunderstood; cabinets and jointing places are
still both used in the network.

A cabinet is a cross-connection point. Where pairs coming from the
exchange can _easily_ by connected to pairs heading towards the
customer.

Jointing places are used for more permanent changes.

Very simplified; say you have a large (2000 pair or so) cable coming
from the exchange. At some point this is split and, say, 4 500 pair
cables head off in different directions. Each of those may end up in
a cabinet, or may be split (at different places along the route
perhaps) into further 100 pair cables. Some of those 100 pairs may go
to other cabinets, others may be split into 20 pairs that go to DPs
(up poles for example).

The same thing happens the other side of the cabinet. A 100 pair may
head off from the cabinet into a housing estate where it is split into
smaller cables that end up at DPs.

Each of the "splits" mentioned above needs a watertight joint. These
are located either in large chambers, smaller footway/road boxes or,
in many cases, are just buried under verges.

If you expand the above scenario many fold, exchanges can have 10s of
large cables leaving them, then you can see why there are so many
joint places around.


Yes I can understand that, but the 2 pairs that leave my house and go
overhead to one of the 2 poles in my street go down inside the hollow pole
into the ground to be underneath the concrete man cover not to a cabinet so
what you give as jointing will be equivalent to a cabinet.
So if Fibre does some time in the long distant future come along I guess a
cabinet will appear some where to connect to my copper wire.
Regards
David.

 




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