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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

BT speed tester



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 21st 11, 04:58 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rodney Pont
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default BT speed tester

Where does the BT speed tester get it's IP profile from?

I'm syncing at 8128k and my ISP has the BRAS at 7.15M but the BT speed
tester says my IP profile is 2000kbps but it does show my sync as
8128kbps. The line stats are perfect with an SNR margin of 10dB and no
loss of connection but I'm getting a lot of packet loss according to my
ISPs graphs. The connection is very slow and things often timeout but
I'm not seeing errors on the modem/line.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #2  
Old January 24th 11, 11:56 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PhilT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 391
Default BT speed tester

On Jan 21, 4:58*pm, "Rodney Pont" wrote:
Where does the BT speed tester get it's IP profile from?


it is derived from your sync speed, when the DSLAM informs the
upstream systems of that. The data can go missing and the profile then
becomes stuck - typically on a new connection.

I'm syncing at 8128k and my ISP has the BRAS at 7.15M but the BT speed
tester says my IP profile is 2000kbps but it does show my sync as
8128kbps. The line stats are perfect with an SNR margin of 10dB and no
loss of connection but I'm getting a lot of packet loss according to my
ISPs graphs. The connection is very slow and things often timeout but
I'm not seeing errors on the modem/line.


Turning the router off overnight sometimes gets a new sync speed
through to the profile calculator, or even a 20 minute off time. Worth
a try, at least.

Otherwise you have to complain to your ISP about a "stuck profile" and
hope they do something about it.

Phil
  #3  
Old January 24th 11, 03:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rodney Pont
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default BT speed tester

On Mon, 24 Jan 2011 03:56:11 -0800 (PST), PhilT wrote:

Where does the BT speed tester get it's IP profile from?


it is derived from your sync speed, when the DSLAM informs the
upstream systems of that. The data can go missing and the profile then
becomes stuck - typically on a new connection.

I'm syncing at 8128k and my ISP has the BRAS at 7.15M but the BT speed
tester says my IP profile is 2000kbps but it does show my sync as
8128kbps. The line stats are perfect with an SNR margin of 10dB and no
loss of connection but I'm getting a lot of packet loss according to my
ISPs graphs. The connection is very slow and things often timeout but
I'm not seeing errors on the modem/line.


Turning the router off overnight sometimes gets a new sync speed
through to the profile calculator, or even a 20 minute off time. Worth
a try, at least.


I shut off for 45 minutes on Thursday and it didn't change. I've not
had a sync speed less than 8128 since April 2008 when a tree broke the
line.

Otherwise you have to complain to your ISP about a "stuck profile" and
hope they do something about it.


The ISP has the correct BRAS of 7150, it's only the BT speed tester
that gets 2000. My packet loss stopped at 6:55 this morning without any
loss of connection.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #4  
Old January 25th 11, 12:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PhilT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default BT speed tester

On Jan 24, 3:20*pm, "Rodney Pont" wrote:


I shut off for 45 minutes on Thursday and it didn't change. I've not
had a sync speed less than 8128 since April 2008 when a tree broke the
line.


try the overnight one then, just in case. Mine stuck at 135 for over a
week until I did that.

Otherwise you have to complain to your ISP about a "stuck profile" and
hope they do something about it.


The ISP has the correct BRAS of 7150, it's only the BT speed tester
that gets 2000. My packet loss stopped at 6:55 this morning without any
loss of connection.


the ISP doesn't own the BRAS profile, the BT BRAS does. The ISP is
informed of it and uses it to set your connection's maximum data rate
however that data then has to pass through the BRAS at which point the
BRAS will limit it to 2000.

So unless the speedtester is getting a wrong answer from the BRAS then
your profile is 2000, part of the same failure that leads it to be so
may explain why your ISP wasn't told it had changed. The ISP can check
the prevailing setting on the circuit via BT's systems.

The behaviour you describe of your slow connection would be consistent
with having more data thrown at the BRAS than its profile allows,
there's very little buffer or flow control on ATM - just dimensioned
circuits.

Phil
  #5  
Old January 25th 11, 12:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PhilT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 391
Default BT speed tester

On Jan 24, 3:20 pm, "Rodney Pont" wrote:
I shut off for 45 minutes on Thursday and it didn't change. I've not
had a sync speed less than 8128 since April 2008 when a tree broke the
line.


try the overnight one then, just in case. Mine stuck at 135 for over
a
week until I did that.

Otherwise you have to complain to your ISP about a "stuck profile" and
hope they do something about it.

The ISP has the correct BRAS of 7150, it's only the BT speed tester
that gets 2000. My packet loss stopped at 6:55 this morning without any
loss of connection.



the ISP doesn't own the BRAS profile, the BT BRAS does. The ISP is
informed of it and uses it to set your connection's maximum data rate
however that data then has to pass through the BRAS at which point
the
BRAS will limit it to 2000.

So unless the speedtester is getting a wrong answer from the BRAS
then
your profile is 2000, part of the same failure that leads it to be so
may explain why your ISP wasn't told it had changed. The ISP can
check
the prevailing setting on the circuit via BT's systems.

The behaviour you describe of your slow connection would be
consistent
with having more data thrown at the BRAS than its profile allows,
there's very little buffer or flow control on ATM - just dimensioned
circuits.

Phil
  #6  
Old January 25th 11, 05:09 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rodney Pont
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default BT speed tester

On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 04:20:30 -0800 (PST), PhilT wrote:

The ISP has the correct BRAS of 7150, it's only the BT speed tester
that gets 2000. My packet loss stopped at 6:55 this morning without any
loss of connection.


the ISP doesn't own the BRAS profile, the BT BRAS does. The ISP is
informed of it and uses it to set your connection's maximum data rate
however that data then has to pass through the BRAS at which point the
BRAS will limit it to 2000.

So unless the speedtester is getting a wrong answer from the BRAS then
your profile is 2000, part of the same failure that leads it to be so
may explain why your ISP wasn't told it had changed. The ISP can check
the prevailing setting on the circuit via BT's systems.


My sync was/is 8128 and I hadn't had any lost connections or errors
since the BT PEW on 23rd December so no reason for the BRAS to change.

The behaviour you describe of your slow connection would be consistent
with having more data thrown at the BRAS than its profile allows,
there's very little buffer or flow control on ATM - just dimensioned
circuits.


I agree with what you are saying. My SNR margin had not dropped below
9dB in that time either so something decided my end was running with a
BRAS of 2000 for no apparent reason and causing the packet loss. That
has now stopped and I'm getting data at very close to 7150kbps but the
BT speed tester still insists it's 2000kbps.

I'm not wanting to temp fate by forcing a resync, one will happen soon
enough and I'll check what the BT speed tester says then.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


 




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