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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

A different Disconnecting Ringer wire question



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 24th 12, 12:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 591
Default A different Disconnecting Ringer wire question

Although I don't appear to have any known signal problems, I have often
wondered about this ringer wire removal.
My house has, (not by my design), the following arrangement:
Incoming fairly new BT wire, replacing the old that is still attached to
the barge boards, comes in to old-style junction box, the rounded-cover
type, located in the mud-room. This was at some stage then run, by BT
I assume, to a Master Socket in the kitchen, only a few feet away, and
where there is a sensible logical place for the main 'phone.
At some time after that, somebody else has come along and added
extensions. There is one flat wire coming from inside the Master socket,
that winds its way around to the far end of the ground floor of the
house, with one socket on the way, and one at the end of its trail.
There is also an extension connected at the first junction box, which
winds around the outside of the back of the house, again with one
socket en route where it enters the house, and another at the end, next
to the bed. For my ADSL modem, I have a flat wire (I know it's not the
best, but it is the only one that fits the physical space available)
running from a plugin filter at the Master Socket to the study. This
will only ever have the modem attached to it, as the phones are DECT
wireless, with the base station connected in the kitchen, at the Master
Socket, and there is a remote handset near the modem.
The bedroom 'phone is sometimes a (different) wireless unit, acting as
a stand-alone unit, sometimes it has an old, old dial-type BT real
'phone instead. This has far and away the loudest ringer of all of
them, a real bell, which is why we keep it.
There is a filter at the bedroom socket, and this is the only place to
isolate it from the ADSL signal, since it is connected to the line
before the Master Socket.
There is a filter at the Master Socket, after the wire heading to the
modem, but before the base station.
If any of the other sockets are used, which is very, very rare, then
there is a spare filter available.
I could replace the faceplate of the Master Socket with a filter
faceplate, but why bother? I would have to make sure that the extension
that winds around the ground floor, and is rarely used, was wired in
after the filter, and rewire it if not, or I can just leave it and use
the spare filter anyway, if it is ever needed.
The extension that goes upstairs would either need to be re-routed and
extended to the Master socket, to take advantage of the filter
faceplate.
Now to the Ringer wire question:
From my description, it is clear that I have lots of ringer wire
winding around the house, both inside and outside. I would assume the
old 'phone handset, with a real bell, still needs a ringer wire? But I
could disconnect the ringer wire at the Master Socket, if it was worth
it, to isolate the rest of the house.
Since I don't know of any problems, is it not worth the effort to do
anything? Or if it is, what, and why?
As an additional question, how would I go about wiring up the external
bell, which still has a transformer available, but no longer has the
On/Off switch that would control it. It is not connected to the 'phone
system at all at the moment, but is near to the first, old-style,
junction box.
If this is more appropriate for the telecom newsgroup, I can move it
there, (I hate cross-posting), but it's firstly to do with removing the
ringer wire for better ADSL signal quality.
--
Davey.

  #2  
Old April 24th 12, 02:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default A different Disconnecting Ringer wire question



"Davey" wrote in message
...
Although I don't appear to have any known signal problems, I have often
wondered about this ringer wire removal.
My house has, (not by my design), the following arrangement:
Incoming fairly new BT wire, replacing the old that is still attached to
the barge boards, comes in to old-style junction box, the rounded-cover
type, located in the mud-room. This was at some stage then run, by BT
I assume, to a Master Socket in the kitchen, only a few feet away, and
where there is a sensible logical place for the main 'phone.
At some time after that, somebody else has come along and added
extensions. There is one flat wire coming from inside the Master socket,
that winds its way around to the far end of the ground floor of the
house, with one socket on the way, and one at the end of its trail.
There is also an extension connected at the first junction box, which
winds around the outside of the back of the house, again with one
socket en route where it enters the house, and another at the end, next
to the bed. For my ADSL modem, I have a flat wire (I know it's not the
best, but it is the only one that fits the physical space available)
running from a plugin filter at the Master Socket to the study. This
will only ever have the modem attached to it, as the phones are DECT
wireless, with the base station connected in the kitchen, at the Master
Socket, and there is a remote handset near the modem.
The bedroom 'phone is sometimes a (different) wireless unit, acting as
a stand-alone unit, sometimes it has an old, old dial-type BT real
'phone instead. This has far and away the loudest ringer of all of
them, a real bell, which is why we keep it.
There is a filter at the bedroom socket, and this is the only place to
isolate it from the ADSL signal, since it is connected to the line
before the Master Socket.
There is a filter at the Master Socket, after the wire heading to the
modem, but before the base station.
If any of the other sockets are used, which is very, very rare, then
there is a spare filter available.
I could replace the faceplate of the Master Socket with a filter
faceplate, but why bother? I would have to make sure that the extension
that winds around the ground floor, and is rarely used, was wired in
after the filter, and rewire it if not, or I can just leave it and use
the spare filter anyway, if it is ever needed.
The extension that goes upstairs would either need to be re-routed and
extended to the Master socket, to take advantage of the filter
faceplate.
Now to the Ringer wire question:
From my description, it is clear that I have lots of ringer wire
winding around the house, both inside and outside. I would assume the
old 'phone handset, with a real bell, still needs a ringer wire? But I
could disconnect the ringer wire at the Master Socket, if it was worth
it, to isolate the rest of the house.
Since I don't know of any problems, is it not worth the effort to do
anything? Or if it is, what, and why?
As an additional question, how would I go about wiring up the external
bell, which still has a transformer available, but no longer has the
On/Off switch that would control it. It is not connected to the 'phone
system at all at the moment, but is near to the first, old-style,
junction box.
If this is more appropriate for the telecom newsgroup, I can move it
there, (I hate cross-posting), but it's firstly to do with removing the
ringer wire for better ADSL signal quality.


If your older telephone is connected via filter (and I hope it is) then the
disconnection of the bell wire at the NTE can only be for the better.
Unfortunately, in your case your A and B leg will also be 'picking' up any
interference as well, but if you're stuck with it there is little you can do
(that why the proper cables are twisted).

  #3  
Old April 24th 12, 02:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 591
Default A different Disconnecting Ringer wire question

On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 14:16:30 +0100
"kraftee" wrote:

The bedroom 'phone is sometimes a (different) wireless unit, acting as
a stand-alone unit, sometimes it has an old, old dial-type BT real
'phone instead. This has far and away the loudest ringer of all of
them, a real bell, which is why we keep it.
There is a filter at the bedroom socket, and this is the only place
to isolate it from the ADSL signal, since it is connected to the
line before the Master Socket.


Yes, it is.
The bedroom 'phone is sometimes a (different) wireless unit, acting as
a stand-alone unit, sometimes it has an old, old dial-type BT real
'phone instead. This has far and away the loudest ringer of all of
them, a real bell, which is why we keep it.
There is a filter at the bedroom socket, and this is the only place to
isolate it from the ADSL signal, since it is connected to the line
before the Master Socket.


Thanks.
--
Davey.
  #4  
Old April 24th 12, 06:59 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Able
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 114
Default A different Disconnecting Ringer wire question


"Davey" wrote in message
...

Since I don't know of any problems, is it not worth the effort to do
anything? Or if it is, what, and why?


If it works....

Just don't take up Amateur Radio. {;-}}

BTW, Faceplate Filters normally include the necessary 2-3-5 terminals for
post-filter extensions and even a notch in the Faceplate body to accomodate
the exit of the extension wiring, so it shouldn't be too difficult to
connect your current wiring to one should you ever feel the need to.

PA


 




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