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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 6th 12, 04:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
stephen
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Posts: 1
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

Why did the cheap modem I got from BT seem to work better than the £109
Netgear N300 I bought to replace it? The BT router was much easier to
setup, seemed to provide faster internet access, didn't buffer iPlayer
at all while the NG does frequently, and the NG has more flashing
lights than the USS Enterprise, including a big stupid bright blue
light on the top!!


  #2  
Old May 6th 12, 04:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
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Posts: 1,765
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers



"stephen" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Why did the cheap modem I got from BT seem to work better than the £109
Netgear N300 I bought to replace it? The BT router was much easier to
setup, seemed to provide faster internet access, didn't buffer iPlayer at
all while the NG does frequently, and the NG has more flashing lights than
the USS Enterprise, including a big stupid bright blue light on the top!!


It couldn't have anything to do with that the one you've got from BT is
already set up and tweaked (as much as it can be) for their service whilst
the Netgear is a blank canvass (so to speak), could it?

  #3  
Old May 6th 12, 06:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
alexd
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Posts: 1,765
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

stephen (for it is he) wrote:

Why did the cheap modem I got from BT seem to work better than the £109
Netgear N300 I bought to replace it?


In general, there are more makes and models of routers than there are ADSL
and router chipsets, so whilst you may be able to choose from a thousand
different routers, your choices about the fundamentals of the router are
much narrower than that.

In this case, thinking about the performance on the line, the ADSL chipset
in your BT modem may be more suited to your line than the one in the N300.
Or perhaps your N300 is on a wireless channel that's congested. Or maybe
there's a bug in the firmware it ships with, and once you upgrade it to the
latest, it will blow you away with its performance. Or maybe it's just a
dud. There are quite a few variables.

--
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18:31:50 up 115 days, 21:03, 5 users, load average: 0.14, 0.89, 0.90
Qua illic est reprehendit, illic est a vindicatum

  #4  
Old May 6th 12, 08:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
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Posts: 2,728
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

alexd wrote:
stephen (for it is he) wrote:

Why did the cheap modem I got from BT seem to work better than the £109
Netgear N300 I bought to replace it?


In general, there are more makes and models of routers than there are ADSL
and router chipsets, so whilst you may be able to choose from a thousand
different routers, your choices about the fundamentals of the router are
much narrower than that.

In this case, thinking about the performance on the line, the ADSL chipset
in your BT modem may be more suited to your line than the one in the N300.
Or perhaps your N300 is on a wireless channel that's congested. Or maybe
there's a bug in the firmware it ships with, and once you upgrade it to the
latest, it will blow you away with its performance. Or maybe it's just a
dud. There are quite a few variables.


+1
In the end the cost is more about decent materalas and components than
performanbce.


--
To people who know nothing, anything is possible.
To people who know too much, it is a sad fact
that they know how little is really possible -
and how hard it is to achieve it.
  #5  
Old May 6th 12, 08:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Alan
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Posts: 34
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

In message , The Natural Philosopher
wrote

In the end the cost is more about decent materalas and components than
performanbce.



Or perhaps not. It is not unknown for identical electronics to be
badged/branded and sold at vastly different prices.
--
Alan
news2009 {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
  #6  
Old May 7th 12, 01:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
michael adams
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Posts: 19
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers


"stephen" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Why did the cheap modem I got from BT seem to work better than the £109 Netgear N300 I
bought to replace it?


Nearly all ISP's recommend specific router models often badged, which
they can then source and supply to their customers at a bulk price.
The ISP may not even make any money on the deal ; encouraging customers
to buy a specific model or models should mean less problems with
troubleshooting and support.

Manufacturers of routers sold retail are already competing
with bundled routers and so they won't sell in volume and their
prices will reflect both a wholesale and retail markup.

Usaully customers are given a choice of declimning a bundled router
and saving themselves money and yet despite there are plenty of
boxed and unused bundled routers from the various ISP's
showing up regularly on eBay ususally complete with the instruction
booklet and installation CD. Usually at bargain prices Even if its not the
identical model it should have been possible to find an unused BT
branded router which would suit. But there again either you're happy
to use eBay regularly, as I am, or you're not.

More expensive stuff with more bells and whistles is always harder to
set up properly, as there are more things to get wrong.

This goes for almost everything from cameras, to hi-fi, to routers
presumably.



michael adams

....
The BT router was much easier to
setup, seemed to provide faster internet access, didn't buffer iPlayer at all while the
NG does frequently, and the NG has more flashing lights than the USS Enterprise,
including a big stupid bright blue light on the top!!




  #7  
Old May 7th 12, 08:49 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
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Posts: 135
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

In article , Michael
adams wrote:
Nearly all ISP's recommend specific router models often badged, which
they can then source and supply to their customers at a bulk price.
The ISP may not even make any money on the deal ; encouraging customers
to buy a specific model or models should mean less problems with
troubleshooting and support.


Support would be the main reason. Trying to diagnose problems over the
phone on a piece of equipment you've never seen with the help of a customer
who hasn't a clue is, to put it mildly, not very productive. With
standardised equipment you soon get to know all the settings and common
pitfalls by heart and it's much quicker and easier. This is why most ISPs
don't offer any kind of support for equipment not supplied by them.

Rod.
--
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http://sourceforge.net/projects/virtual-access/

  #8  
Old May 7th 12, 06:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
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Posts: 1,765
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers



"Roderick Stewart" wrote in
message .myzen.co.uk...
In article , Michael
adams wrote:
Nearly all ISP's recommend specific router models often badged, which
they can then source and supply to their customers at a bulk price.
The ISP may not even make any money on the deal ; encouraging customers
to buy a specific model or models should mean less problems with
troubleshooting and support.


Support would be the main reason. Trying to diagnose problems over the
phone on a piece of equipment you've never seen with the help of a
customer
who hasn't a clue is, to put it mildly, not very productive. With
standardised equipment you soon get to know all the settings and common
pitfalls by heart and it's much quicker and easier. This is why most ISPs
don't offer any kind of support for equipment not supplied by them.


Problem with that tack is that if you do something not classed as normal
(with me it's turning the wifi off) front desk support refuse to help until
the wifi is back on again because that's the way it should be, despite
anything you tell them

  #9  
Old May 7th 12, 10:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 135
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers

In article , Kraftee wrote:
Nearly all ISP's recommend specific router models often badged, which
they can then source and supply to their customers at a bulk price.
The ISP may not even make any money on the deal ; encouraging customers
to buy a specific model or models should mean less problems with
troubleshooting and support.


Support would be the main reason. Trying to diagnose problems over the
phone on a piece of equipment you've never seen with the help of a
customer
who hasn't a clue is, to put it mildly, not very productive. With
standardised equipment you soon get to know all the settings and common
pitfalls by heart and it's much quicker and easier. This is why most ISPs
don't offer any kind of support for equipment not supplied by them.


Problem with that tack is that if you do something not classed as normal
(with me it's turning the wifi off) front desk support refuse to help until
the wifi is back on again because that's the way it should be, despite
anything you tell them


Depends on whose front desk it is. There's usually a defined range of
operations that are considered to be within their remit, for purely practical
reasons. People who change their router login details almost invariably forget
them, and those who try to set up MAC filtering can tie themselves into
terrible knots, usually to the extent of being unable to connect with anything
until a factory reset has been done, but basic adjustments like just turning
wireless off because they're not using it should be perfectly acceptable.

Rod.
--
Virtual Access V6.3 free usenet/email software from
http://sourceforge.net/projects/virtual-access/

  #10  
Old May 8th 12, 08:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Difference between cheap and expensive ADSL Modem Routers



"Roderick Stewart" wrote in
message .myzen.co.uk...
In article , Kraftee wrote:
Nearly all ISP's recommend specific router models often badged, which
they can then source and supply to their customers at a bulk price.
The ISP may not even make any money on the deal ; encouraging
customers
to buy a specific model or models should mean less problems with
troubleshooting and support.

Support would be the main reason. Trying to diagnose problems over the
phone on a piece of equipment you've never seen with the help of a
customer
who hasn't a clue is, to put it mildly, not very productive. With
standardised equipment you soon get to know all the settings and common
pitfalls by heart and it's much quicker and easier. This is why most
ISPs
don't offer any kind of support for equipment not supplied by them.


Problem with that tack is that if you do something not classed as normal
(with me it's turning the wifi off) front desk support refuse to help
until
the wifi is back on again because that's the way it should be, despite
anything you tell them


Depends on whose front desk it is. There's usually a defined range of
operations that are considered to be within their remit, for purely
practical
reasons. People who change their router login details almost invariably
forget
them, and those who try to set up MAC filtering can tie themselves into
terrible knots, usually to the extent of being unable to connect with
anything
until a factory reset has been done, but basic adjustments like just
turning
wireless off because they're not using it should be perfectly acceptable.


That's right should, but it's not in the script/tick sheet and that's if
they've got the correct sheet for the router you've got (supplied by them).

 




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