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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Cabling question



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 8th 12, 02:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default Cabling question

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks
Scott
  #2  
Old September 8th 12, 03:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 14:39:59 +0100, Scott
wrote:

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks
Scott

Re-cable? yes, especially if the individual wires have solid colours.
Use modern twisted pair phone cable or better still *solid core* CAT5
Joints are potential points of failure so should be avoided where
possible, particularly where they might get damp. but there will be
many joints in the cable on the way from the exchange

You are the appropriately qualified person to do this, just trust me
on this unless you have money to waste.

Fibre to the premises doesn't yet exist as a consumer grade product
and when it does become available I imagine it will be terminated as
soon as it enters the building and not run around inside.

Hang on, you get 73Mb/s? so are you on FTTC now?
A bit naughty of the installation engineer to leave 1960s vintage
junction boxes and non twisted cables (if that's what they are) on a
new VDSL installation.


--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #3  
Old September 8th 12, 06:35 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 15:38:55 +0100, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 14:39:59 +0100, Scott
wrote:

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks
Scott

Re-cable? yes, especially if the individual wires have solid colours.
Use modern twisted pair phone cable or better still *solid core* CAT5
Joints are potential points of failure so should be avoided where
possible, particularly where they might get damp. but there will be
many joints in the cable on the way from the exchange

You are the appropriately qualified person to do this, just trust me
on this unless you have money to waste.


Thanks. I believe it is coloured wires but I can't even open the box
as it is seized. The installation is at least 22 years old.

Fibre to the premises doesn't yet exist as a consumer grade product
and when it does become available I imagine it will be terminated as
soon as it enters the building and not run around inside.

Hang on, you get 73Mb/s? so are you on FTTC now?
A bit naughty of the installation engineer to leave 1960s vintage
junction boxes and non twisted cables (if that's what they are) on a
new VDSL installation.


Yes FTTC from Zen, installed by Openreach. I think the logic employed
by the engineer was that the line speed seems very good and the cable
takes a very bizarre route, appearing and disappearing, including a
trip behind the bathroom tiles. I think he probably thought he was
doing me a favour by leaving well alone!

If I do it, I would take the cable above the ceiling. Part of the
route will have to go round bends, so would there be much to lose by
using stranded cable?
  #4  
Old September 8th 12, 07:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
tigger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Cabling question

Scott writted thus:

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters the
building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge shaped box
marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs to a second
box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of entry
to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later date by
an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the future
require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install now
effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks Scott


Don't try and "fix" something that works is my philosophy...



--
http://db.tt/aI6WBZ7w
  #5  
Old September 8th 12, 07:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,728
Default Cabling question

Scott wrote:
I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Over short runs CAT5 is as good as anything else and fully capable of
matching existing FTTC speeds.

You can get BT to connect your won CAT5 wiring to the incoming if you
ask nicely

But a stock connector block works well.




Thanks
Scott



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc'-ra-cy) - a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
  #6  
Old September 8th 12, 08:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 19:54:09 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

Scott wrote:
I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Over short runs CAT5 is as good as anything else and fully capable of
matching existing FTTC speeds.

You can get BT to connect your won CAT5 wiring to the incoming if you
ask nicely


Would this involve an NTE5 socket at point of entry or can Cat5 wiring
be connected to the 'lozenge'? The problem is that the point of entry
is in the bathroom so I would rather not have a master socket there.
Is it Cat5 rather than Cat5e or Cat6?

But a stock connector block works well.


Is this the same principle as the lozenge?
  #7  
Old September 8th 12, 08:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 8 Sep 2012 18:29:27 +0000 (UTC), tigger
wrote:

Scott writted thus:

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters the
building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge shaped box
marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs to a second
box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of entry
to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later date by
an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the future
require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install now
effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks Scott


Don't try and "fix" something that works is my philosophy...


I'm thinking along these lines (excuse the pun!) myself, but thinking
of providing a cable path for the future if I encounter problems.

I may just ask the fitters to put in a length of plastic pipe so the
cable can be fed through in future if needed.
  #8  
Old September 8th 12, 08:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 18:35:26 +0100, Scott
wrote:

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 15:38:55 +0100, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 14:39:59 +0100, Scott
wrote:

I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Thanks
Scott

Re-cable? yes, especially if the individual wires have solid colours.
Use modern twisted pair phone cable or better still *solid core* CAT5
Joints are potential points of failure so should be avoided where
possible, particularly where they might get damp. but there will be
many joints in the cable on the way from the exchange

You are the appropriately qualified person to do this, just trust me
on this unless you have money to waste.


Thanks. I believe it is coloured wires but I can't even open the box
as it is seized. The installation is at least 22 years old.

Fibre to the premises doesn't yet exist as a consumer grade product
and when it does become available I imagine it will be terminated as
soon as it enters the building and not run around inside.

Hang on, you get 73Mb/s? so are you on FTTC now?
A bit naughty of the installation engineer to leave 1960s vintage
junction boxes and non twisted cables (if that's what they are) on a
new VDSL installation.


Yes FTTC from Zen, installed by Openreach. I think the logic employed
by the engineer was that the line speed seems very good and the cable
takes a very bizarre route, appearing and disappearing, including a
trip behind the bathroom tiles. I think he probably thought he was
doing me a favour by leaving well alone!

If I do it, I would take the cable above the ceiling. Part of the
route will have to go round bends, so would there be much to lose by
using stranded cable?


The stranded / solid wire comment was if you decided to use CAT 5
instead of phone wire. The reason to use solid core rather than
stranded is because stranded wire is not intended to be used with IDC
punch down connectors.

The more more significant point I was making is the cable old that the
OR engineer left in service.
If it is solid colour four core vis. orange, green, blue & brown it is
not twisted pair and shouldn't be retained for ADSL let alone VDSL.

Modern telephone wire has two complimentary colours on each wire
blue with white tracer & white with blue tracer make one twisted pair
The wire is typically 3 pair so the other wires are orange/white,
white orange and the fourth pair is brown/white, white brown.

Is that a better explanation?

Can you check the wire colours at the other end of the run?

Could the engineer have run a new cable around the outside of the
property and come through a wall where you wanted the master socket?

--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #9  
Old September 8th 12, 08:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,728
Default Cabling question

Scott wrote:
On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 19:54:09 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

Scott wrote:
I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Over short runs CAT5 is as good as anything else and fully capable of
matching existing FTTC speeds.

You can get BT to connect your won CAT5 wiring to the incoming if you
ask nicely


Would this involve an NTE5 socket at point of entry or can Cat5 wiring
be connected to the 'lozenge'?


To the lozenge

The problem is that the point of entry
is in the bathroom so I would rather not have a master socket there.
Is it Cat5 rather than Cat5e or Cat6?
But a stock connector block works well.


Is this the same principle as the lozenge?


If you have the 'lozenge;' connect to that.

The run to a nice filtered faceplate where you want the router.

If you must have extensions everywhere rather than a PABX, run from the
filtered side of that to a BT *master* socket elsewhere and run the
extensions of the far side of that.



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc'-ra-cy) - a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
  #10  
Old September 8th 12, 08:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Cabling question

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 20:12:22 +0100, Scott
wrote:

On Sat, 08 Sep 2012 19:54:09 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

Scott wrote:
I am getting a very good broadband speed and also getting a new
bathroom.

The point of my question is that the telephone cable runs through the
bathroom so there is an opportunity to replace it. The line enters
the building from a telegraph pole and is connected to a lozenge
shaped box marked 'GPO'. A cable (which is round but not thick) runs
to a second box marked 'T' then a similar cable runs to the BT master
socket.

I thought that the cable run was supposed to be uninterrupted.

I am wondering about running a new cable direct from the point of
entry to the master socket, which could then be connected at a later
date by an appropriately qualified person.

As I say, there is no difficulty at the moment and the broadband works
exceptionally well (73 Mbps). Is there any advantage in running a
cable now for the future?

I also wonder if the future is fibre to the premises, so will the
future require a fibre optic cable, leaving any copper cable I install
now effectively redundant.

Any thoughts from the experts?

Over short runs CAT5 is as good as anything else and fully capable of
matching existing FTTC speeds.

You can get BT to connect your won CAT5 wiring to the incoming if you
ask nicely


Would this involve an NTE5 socket at point of entry or can Cat5 wiring
be connected to the 'lozenge'? The problem is that the point of entry
is in the bathroom so I would rather not have a master socket there.
Is it Cat5 rather than Cat5e or Cat6?


CAT5e

There is a dilemma about using the customers cable before the master
socket because strictly speaking it's openreach's responsibility, but
in practice the engineer might well agree particularly if it saves him
work.
But a stock connector block works well.


Is this the same principle as the lozenge?


It looks more modern and has IDC connectors rather than screw
terminals.

--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
 




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