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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Rural Broadband



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 4th 12, 11:18 AM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Rural Broadband

Hi!

We have a local problem with demand for CN20 ADSL2 outstripping the
capacity of the physical lines into the village which means that every
time someone signs up two grannies get DACS'd to free a real copper
circuit. The disturbance to old wiring is taking its toll.

This has been true for a while, but the contortions that BT are going
through now to install new ADSL subscribers invariably breaks several
other users so we have BT vans parked up semi-permanently.

The faults amongst my neighbours include phones that make a vague tinkle
and are incredibly noisy on POTS (think shingle seashore), phones that
never ring but do have dialtone, and phones with nothing at all. Some
can make outgoing calls but can only receive calls if they are psychic
or have arranged to pick up the receiver at a fixed time.

It is getting beyond a joke. A friend has now been unable to use their
fixed line at all now for 3 weeks! Mine is sort of working although I
have lost about 2000kbps off my connection speed about a month ago

I understand that they get a pittance for each day without service after
the first three days or something but have to make a claim.

Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #2  
Old November 4th 12, 11:25 AM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,728
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/12 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:
Hi!

We have a local problem with demand for CN20 ADSL2 outstripping the
capacity of the physical lines into the village which means that every
time someone signs up two grannies get DACS'd to free a real copper
circuit. The disturbance to old wiring is taking its toll.

This has been true for a while, but the contortions that BT are going
through now to install new ADSL subscribers invariably breaks several
other users so we have BT vans parked up semi-permanently.

The faults amongst my neighbours include phones that make a vague tinkle
and are incredibly noisy on POTS (think shingle seashore), phones that
never ring but do have dialtone, and phones with nothing at all. Some
can make outgoing calls but can only receive calls if they are psychic
or have arranged to pick up the receiver at a fixed time.

It is getting beyond a joke. A friend has now been unable to use their
fixed line at all now for 3 weeks! Mine is sort of working although I
have lost about 2000kbps off my connection speed about a month ago

I understand that they get a pittance for each day without service after
the first three days or something but have to make a claim.

Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).

Hmm. Sounds like an extreme case of what we had here.

Openreach ended up laying fat new cables to the exchange in many places.

I'd keep up the pressure on Openreach/BT wholeseale.

A better ISP than the big majors helps.

Keep reporting faults. Eventually the penny drops at BT that uprating
the copper will save them engineer visits


--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc'-ra-cy) - a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.

  #3  
Old November 4th 12, 11:56 AM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/2012 11:25, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 04/11/12 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:


I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).

Hmm. Sounds like an extreme case of what we had here.

Openreach ended up laying fat new cables to the exchange in many places.

I'd keep up the pressure on Openreach/BT wholeseale.


Not sure a rural parish of under 200 folk and 60 houses can generate
much pressure against a goliath like BT wholesale.

A better ISP than the big majors helps.

Keep reporting faults. Eventually the penny drops at BT that uprating
the copper will save them engineer visits


They have a semi-permanent encampment here already. This happens every
time a new broadband circuit is added - a guy at each junction box with
a line tester. When you see the state of the multicoloured wire knitting
in the black "waterproof" U shaped junction boxes and the amount of
water in the cable trunking it is amazing anything works!

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #4  
Old November 4th 12, 12:09 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 620
Default Rural Broadband

Martin Brown wrote:
On 04/11/2012 11:25, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 04/11/12 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:


I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).

Hmm. Sounds like an extreme case of what we had here.

Openreach ended up laying fat new cables to the exchange in many places.

I'd keep up the pressure on Openreach/BT wholeseale.


Not sure a rural parish of under 200 folk and 60 houses can generate
much pressure against a goliath like BT wholesale.

A better ISP than the big majors helps.

Keep reporting faults. Eventually the penny drops at BT that uprating
the copper will save them engineer visits


They have a semi-permanent encampment here already. This happens every
time a new broadband circuit is added - a guy at each junction box with
a line tester. When you see the state of the multicoloured wire knitting
in the black "waterproof" U shaped junction boxes and the amount of
water in the cable trunking it is amazing anything works!

There are an awful lot of communities suffering in the same way. I'm in
a village of 230 electors living in about 120 houses; and the exchange
is about 6km distant. Same problems - exacerbated by the highways
department when they clean the draininge grips with their machine and
cut through the phone cable in several places.

Locally other communities have lost all connectivity when the thieves
steal the cables.

It will get worse - in a couple of year we will all need generators to
run the lights, fridges, oil CH systems, and computers; so I guess ADSL
will be low on most people's priorities. A chainsaw and a woodburner
are now essential.

Vodafone can occasionally deliver a voice service to mobiles - better if
you are up a ladder ... But no internet connectivity.

I suggest you move house.

--
Graham J
  #5  
Old November 4th 12, 12:15 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
DrTeeth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Rural Broadband

On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 11:56:51 +0000, just as I was about to take a
herb, Martin Brown disturbed my
reverie and wrote:

Not sure a rural parish of under 200 folk and 60 houses can generate
much pressure against a goliath like BT wholesale.

Such negative waves...of course you can!

First, you email the CEO of BT/BTO from http://www.ceoemail.com/
Second, you get a .co.uk domain and set up a web site. Make the URL
pertinent - btdonotgiveadamn.co.uk and btdonotgiveadamn.org are both
available for 3.99
Third, get the site up and running and get everybody in the area
affected to place links to this site in all their emails.
Fourth, contact all local and national press
Fifth, get along to thinkbroadband.co.uk and get advice on any
technical aspects of your case. Many BT engineers are there and
willing to help.
Finally, when your site is up and running, email the URL to the person
in the first point above and tell him what you are doing.

I could think of more, but I have just got up and am only halfway
through my cup of coffee.

Good luck.
--

Cheers

DrT
______________________________
We may not be able to prevent the stormy times in
our lives; but we can always choose whether or not
to dance in the puddles (Jewish proverb).
  #6  
Old November 4th 12, 01:02 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 467
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/2012 12:15, DrTeeth wrote:
On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 11:56:51 +0000, just as I was about to take a
herb, Martin disturbed my
reverie and wrote:

Not sure a rural parish of under 200 folk and 60 houses can generate
much pressure against a goliath like BT wholesale.

Such negative waves...of course you can!

First, you email the CEO of BT/BTO from http://www.ceoemail.com/
Second, you get a .co.uk domain and set up a web site. Make the URL
pertinent - btdonotgiveadamn.co.uk and btdonotgiveadamn.org are both
available for 3.99
Third, get the site up and running and get everybody in the area
affected to place links to this site in all their emails.
Fourth, contact all local and national press
Fifth, get along to thinkbroadband.co.uk and get advice on any
technical aspects of your case. Many BT engineers are there and
willing to help.
Finally, when your site is up and running, email the URL to the person
in the first point above and tell him what you are doing.

I could think of more, but I have just got up and am only halfway
through my cup of coffee.


All good advice, similar to wot I would have rote if I'd have logged in
earlier.
Also, it may well be worth contacting your local council to see if there
are any regional rural broadband initiatives going in your area, which
could have grants available.
If so, these would invariably involve volunteers setting up a steering
group and organising local surveys to establish demand, etc. If it all
goes according to plan, you could end up with a one-off village scheme
(though probably not provided by BT).
For a current example, see:
http://www.monmouthshire.gov.uk/656/...6617df457ce29d


George
  #7  
Old November 4th 12, 01:17 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
MB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/2012 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:
Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).



Why is it BT that always gets blamed and not all the other telecom
companies which are not rushing in to provide a service or at least not
unless the government gives them money from the TV Licence.

Perhaps Beardie could use his profits there rather than playing with
spaceships, balloons etc
  #8  
Old November 4th 12, 01:31 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 467
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/2012 13:17, MB wrote:
On 04/11/2012 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:
Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).



Why is it BT that always gets blamed and not all the other telecom
companies which are not rushing in to provide a service or at least not
unless the government gives them money from the TV Licence.

Perhaps Beardie could use his profits there rather than playing with
spaceships, balloons etc


Er... maybe because Openreach (part of BT) owns the network and
currently has a policy of prioritising enhancements of that network in
areas of greater population at the expense of less densely-populated areas.
Until/unless they change this policy - and they won't without being
forced to - rural areas will continue to suffer while towns' and cities'
service will continue to improve.
Moreover, alternative network providers (e.g. Virgin) aren't interested
in expanding their networks beyond town/city boundaries either.

George
  #9  
Old November 4th 12, 02:08 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Rural Broadband

On 04/11/2012 13:31, George Weston wrote:
On 04/11/2012 13:17, MB wrote:
On 04/11/2012 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:


Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).



Why is it BT that always gets blamed and not all the other telecom
companies which are not rushing in to provide a service or at least not
unless the government gives them money from the TV Licence.

Perhaps Beardie could use his profits there rather than playing with
spaceships, balloons etc


Nearest Virgin cable service is about 12 miles away as the crow flies or
more as the fibre runs. Mobile reception is marginal.

Funnily enough there is a grumble in the local press following an
ineffectual broadband blather session chaired by Julian Smith MP at
Fountains Abbey. The places with aluminium wire have the worst of it.

http://www.darlingtonandstocktontime...dband_hot_air/

Amusingly the author appears to be an Archers character.

Er... maybe because Openreach (part of BT) owns the network and
currently has a policy of prioritising enhancements of that network in
areas of greater population at the expense of less densely-populated areas.


Or they get paid extra by the County Council to do otherwise. But unless
you can get over a certain (fairly high) threshold of takers for
expensive highspeed broadband no provider is interested at all.

Until/unless they change this policy - and they won't without being
forced to - rural areas will continue to suffer while towns' and cities'
service will continue to improve.
Moreover, alternative network providers (e.g. Virgin) aren't interested
in expanding their networks beyond town/city boundaries either.


For clarity we are generally talking here about locations where cable or
fibre is a complete non-starter and mains gas is entirely unknown.

The game is BT exchange or nothing. Using an ISP other than BT (as I do)
merely complicates fault reporting and delays repairs even more.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #10  
Old November 4th 12, 02:27 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 620
Default Rural Broadband

Martin Brown wrote:
On 04/11/2012 13:31, George Weston wrote:
On 04/11/2012 13:17, MB wrote:
On 04/11/2012 11:18, Martin Brown wrote:


Any suggestions for who to get involved? In theory there is some money
for "rural broadband" in N Yorks but it looks like it will mostly be
spent where it does BT the most good with FTC in major towns and
cities.

I suspect hell will freeze over before they spend any more money on our
exchange. Neighbouring village is *so* bad they are an experimental
zone
for microwave symmetric internet broadband (expensive 20Mbps).


Why is it BT that always gets blamed and not all the other telecom
companies which are not rushing in to provide a service or at least not
unless the government gives them money from the TV Licence.

Perhaps Beardie could use his profits there rather than playing with
spaceships, balloons etc


Nearest Virgin cable service is about 12 miles away as the crow flies or
more as the fibre runs. Mobile reception is marginal.

Funnily enough there is a grumble in the local press following an
ineffectual broadband blather session chaired by Julian Smith MP at
Fountains Abbey. The places with aluminium wire have the worst of it.

http://www.darlingtonandstocktontime...dband_hot_air/


Amusingly the author appears to be an Archers character.

Er... maybe because Openreach (part of BT) owns the network and
currently has a policy of prioritising enhancements of that network in
areas of greater population at the expense of less densely-populated
areas.


Or they get paid extra by the County Council to do otherwise. But unless
you can get over a certain (fairly high) threshold of takers for
expensive highspeed broadband no provider is interested at all.

Until/unless they change this policy - and they won't without being
forced to - rural areas will continue to suffer while towns' and cities'
service will continue to improve.
Moreover, alternative network providers (e.g. Virgin) aren't interested
in expanding their networks beyond town/city boundaries either.


For clarity we are generally talking here about locations where cable or
fibre is a complete non-starter and mains gas is entirely unknown.

The game is BT exchange or nothing. Using an ISP other than BT (as I do)
merely complicates fault reporting and delays repairs even more.


I disagree: using an ISP other than BT - provided one makes an
intelligent choice - usually ensures a prompt and effective resolution
of faults.

--
Graham J



 




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