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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

10 days and counting to fix fault



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 20th 12, 11:03 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Justin C
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault


On Friday 9th November I notified BT of a fault.
While I still have a network connection the download
speed is lousy, I'm getting about 56K on what should
be at least 2MB.

It'd been that way for a while, I thought a router
re-boot might fix it, but no. Checking with my ISP
(Andrews Arnold) I found some diagnostic tools on
their site, ran them and they reported a fault on my
line. So I telephone BT in India who also ran the
tests and agreed there was a fault. I was told they'd
have it fixed by Tuesday last week.

They've wanted to gain access to my house twice (even
though they say the fault is not in my house) during
the hours that normal people work, not giving me
enough notice to arrange someone to be there.

I called them again Friday just gone and was told
it'd be fixed by today, it's still not fixed. I got a
text today saying they're "sorry, but we're still
trying to fix your fault. We'll be in touch as soon
as we've got any news." Should I expect better than
this? Or do I have to lump it because I've got a
connection to the web, it's just very slow?

Justin.

--
Justin C, by the sea.
  #2  
Old November 20th 12, 11:19 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,728
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On 20/11/12 11:03, Justin C wrote:

On Friday 9th November I notified BT of a fault.
While I still have a network connection the download
speed is lousy, I'm getting about 56K on what should
be at least 2MB.

It'd been that way for a while, I thought a router
re-boot might fix it, but no. Checking with my ISP
(Andrews Arnold) I found some diagnostic tools on
their site, ran them and they reported a fault on my
line. So I telephone BT in India who also ran the
tests and agreed there was a fault. I was told they'd
have it fixed by Tuesday last week.

They've wanted to gain access to my house twice (even
though they say the fault is not in my house) during
the hours that normal people work, not giving me
enough notice to arrange someone to be there.


There is a reason for that. They want to put a reflectometer and maybe a
tone on the line in order to :
(a) determine where the bad joint is
(b) work out which pair is yours when they get to that junction box with
the bad link in it.

I called them again Friday just gone and was told
it'd be fixed by today, it's still not fixed. I got a
text today saying they're "sorry, but we're still
trying to fix your fault. We'll be in touch as soon
as we've got any news." Should I expect better than
this? Or do I have to lump it because I've got a
connection to the web, it's just very slow?


You should expect better.

The problem is that the loop is you - AAISP- BT wholesale-BT
openreach-the actual engineer on the job .

The engineer is the key. All that bureaucracy is just bovine
excremental overhead. In the end if the engineer can get to each end of
the line with his kit, and then remake all the joints or even swap pairs
back to the exchange, the job will get done.

Really you should try and arrange a key with a neighbour and an envelope
for the BT engineer telling him where the sockets are, and where the
coffee and biscuits are, or insist that he phones you directly before he
arrives in order that you can drive home and be there when he arrives.




Justin.



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc'-ra-cy) - a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.

  #3  
Old November 20th 12, 02:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DaverN
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On 20/11/2012 11:19, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 20/11/12 11:03, Justin C wrote:

On Friday 9th November I notified BT of a fault.
While I still have a network connection the download
speed is lousy, I'm getting about 56K on what should
be at least 2MB.

It'd been that way for a while, I thought a router
re-boot might fix it, but no. Checking with my ISP
(Andrews Arnold) I found some diagnostic tools on
their site, ran them and they reported a fault on my
line. So I telephone BT in India who also ran the
tests and agreed there was a fault. I was told they'd
have it fixed by Tuesday last week.

They've wanted to gain access to my house twice (even
though they say the fault is not in my house) during
the hours that normal people work, not giving me
enough notice to arrange someone to be there.


There is a reason for that. They want to put a reflectometer and maybe a
tone on the line in order to :
(a) determine where the bad joint is
(b) work out which pair is yours when they get to that junction box with
the bad link in it.

I called them again Friday just gone and was told
it'd be fixed by today, it's still not fixed. I got a
text today saying they're "sorry, but we're still
trying to fix your fault. We'll be in touch as soon
as we've got any news." Should I expect better than
this? Or do I have to lump it because I've got a
connection to the web, it's just very slow?


You should expect better.

The problem is that the loop is you - AAISP- BT wholesale-BT
openreach-the actual engineer on the job .


You may have overlooked the OP's statement that he had notified BT. He
has not stated specifically whether he has reported a PSTN fault or a
broadband fault, but it can reasonably be assumed to be a PSTN fault
since BT has accepted his report. Presumably he is hoping that his slow
ADSL speed will improve by itself once the PSTN fault has been fixed but
until that fault has been found and fixed it is almost impossible to
know if he has another problem with ADSL.

If BT were to offer engineer visits out of working hours, it would
probably put up costs and therefore affect prices. That would also
raise the concerns of engineers working in darkness during the winter
months. The whole issue of arranging visits to customers' premises has
been highlighted in recent decades by more homes having all family
members working during the day. It affects all forms of delivery of
goods but particularly BT because they usually need physical access
inside premises. Presumably that is the reason behind BT fixing the
network termination to external walls for new installations.

Arranging fixed times for visits is not a trivial issue, in terms of the
effective use of resources, when the time taken by an engineer on each
preceding problem cannot be predicted with accuracy.

--
DaverN
  #4  
Old November 21st 12, 10:50 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Justin C
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On 2012-11-20, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 20/11/12 11:03, Justin C wrote:

On Friday 9th November I notified BT of a fault.
While I still have a network connection the download
speed is lousy, I'm getting about 56K on what should
be at least 2MB.

It'd been that way for a while, I thought a router
re-boot might fix it, but no. Checking with my ISP
(Andrews Arnold) I found some diagnostic tools on
their site, ran them and they reported a fault on my
line. So I telephone BT in India who also ran the
tests and agreed there was a fault. I was told they'd
have it fixed by Tuesday last week.

They've wanted to gain access to my house twice (even
though they say the fault is not in my house) during
the hours that normal people work, not giving me
enough notice to arrange someone to be there.


There is a reason for that. They want to put a reflectometer and maybe a
tone on the line in order to :
(a) determine where the bad joint is
(b) work out which pair is yours when they get to that junction box with
the bad link in it.

I called them again Friday just gone and was told
it'd be fixed by today, it's still not fixed. I got a
text today saying they're "sorry, but we're still
trying to fix your fault. We'll be in touch as soon
as we've got any news." Should I expect better than
this? Or do I have to lump it because I've got a
connection to the web, it's just very slow?


You should expect better.

The problem is that the loop is you - AAISP- BT wholesale-BT
openreach-the actual engineer on the job .

The engineer is the key. All that bureaucracy is just bovine
excremental overhead. In the end if the engineer can get to each end of
the line with his kit, and then remake all the joints or even swap pairs
back to the exchange, the job will get done.

Really you should try and arrange a key with a neighbour and an envelope
for the BT engineer telling him where the sockets are, and where the
coffee and biscuits are, or insist that he phones you directly before he
arrives in order that you can drive home and be there when he arrives.



I don't mind arranging to be there, I just need a bit of notice!

Anyway, I got a text this morning saying they've now fixed it,
I'll give it a try when I get home.

Justin.

--
Justin C, by the sea.
  #5  
Old December 3rd 12, 06:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Newshound
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On 20/11/2012 14:50, DaverN wrote:
On 20/11/2012 11:19, The Natural Philosopher wrote:



Arranging fixed times for visits is not a trivial issue, in terms of the
effective use of resources, when the time taken by an engineer on each
preceding problem cannot be predicted with accuracy.

Agreed, but surely these days the "engineer" carries a mobile? It seems
to be totally beyond the wit of man to give them the customer's mobile
number. When they finish one job, can't they phone to say "I'm on my
way, will you be there in half an hour or shall I skip to my next job".
It would also allow them to call to say "Very sorry, I won't be there
today after all" which would go a long way to alleviating the
frustration of missed appointments.

To be fair, lorry drivers doing large deliveries seem to be very good at
this sort of customer management. (But of course they are not called
"engineers").

Not helped I suppose by Health and Safety which will no longer let us
use a hands free when driving on works business. Apart from this
nonsense, the mobile is the single most useful tool for organising
communications between busy people.


  #6  
Old December 3rd 12, 10:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault


"newshound" wrote in message
eb.com...
On 20/11/2012 14:50, DaverN wrote:
On 20/11/2012 11:19, The Natural Philosopher wrote:



Arranging fixed times for visits is not a trivial issue, in terms
of the
effective use of resources, when the time taken by an engineer on
each
preceding problem cannot be predicted with accuracy.

Agreed, but surely these days the "engineer" carries a mobile? It
seems to be totally beyond the wit of man to give them the
customer's mobile number. When they finish one job, can't they phone
to say "I'm on my way, will you be there in half an hour or shall I
skip to my next job". It would also allow them to call to say "Very
sorry, I won't be there today after all" which would go a long way
to alleviating the frustration of missed appointments.

To be fair, lorry drivers doing large deliveries seem to be very
good at this sort of customer management. (But of course they are
not called "engineers").

Not helped I suppose by Health and Safety which will no longer let
us use a hands free when driving on works business. Apart from this
nonsense, the mobile is the single most useful tool for organising
communications between busy people.


One very big hole in your idea and that is the engineer doesn't know
where he is going after he finishes the job he has got.

So yes a call to say he is on his way but as for sorry won't be there
today, that's down to 'Flexibility'/Control and has nothing to do with
any field person at all

  #7  
Old December 3rd 12, 11:11 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 467
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On 03/12/2012 22:48, kraftee wrote:

"newshound" wrote in message
eb.com...
On 20/11/2012 14:50, DaverN wrote:
On 20/11/2012 11:19, The Natural Philosopher wrote:



Arranging fixed times for visits is not a trivial issue, in terms of the
effective use of resources, when the time taken by an engineer on each
preceding problem cannot be predicted with accuracy.

Agreed, but surely these days the "engineer" carries a mobile? It
seems to be totally beyond the wit of man to give them the customer's
mobile number. When they finish one job, can't they phone to say "I'm
on my way, will you be there in half an hour or shall I skip to my
next job". It would also allow them to call to say "Very sorry, I
won't be there today after all" which would go a long way to
alleviating the frustration of missed appointments.

To be fair, lorry drivers doing large deliveries seem to be very good
at this sort of customer management. (But of course they are not
called "engineers").

Not helped I suppose by Health and Safety which will no longer let us
use a hands free when driving on works business. Apart from this
nonsense, the mobile is the single most useful tool for organising
communications between busy people.


One very big hole in your idea and that is the engineer doesn't know
where he is going after he finishes the job he has got.

So yes a call to say he is on his way but as for sorry won't be there
today, that's down to 'Flexibility'/Control and has nothing to do with
any field person at all


Which sums up the problem nicely and illustrates the fact that Openreach
is only allowed to deal directly with with service providers and has no
direct link to the end user.
Added to the fact that, as you say, the poor old Openreach technician
has to report "job finished" to his controller before he knows where
they're going to send him off to on the next job.
A recipe for disaster but that's the way it is.

How much better it would be if Openreach were allowed to operate in the
same way as the electricity companies.
For example, I get my electricity from SWALEC and pay my bills to them.
However, if I get a power failure, I call the "Openreach equivalent"
(in my case, Western Power Distribution) and they deal directly with me
in rectifying the fault.
SWALEC don't even know or care if I've had a power failure.

So, in my dream world, I would pay Plusnet for my internet service but
if it went wrong, I would contact Openreach, who could keep me advised
of progress and deal with me direct.

Simples! I wish it was...

George


  #8  
Old December 4th 12, 03:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 525
Default 10 days and counting to fix fault

On Wed, 21 Nov 2012 10:50:06 +0000, Justin C
wrote:

On 2012-11-20, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 20/11/12 11:03, Justin C wrote:

On Friday 9th November I notified BT of a fault.
While I still have a network connection the download
speed is lousy, I'm getting about 56K on what should
be at least 2MB.

It'd been that way for a while, I thought a router
re-boot might fix it, but no. Checking with my ISP
(Andrews Arnold) I found some diagnostic tools on
their site, ran them and they reported a fault on my
line. So I telephone BT in India who also ran the
tests and agreed there was a fault. I was told they'd
have it fixed by Tuesday last week.

They've wanted to gain access to my house twice (even
though they say the fault is not in my house) during
the hours that normal people work, not giving me
enough notice to arrange someone to be there.


There is a reason for that. They want to put a reflectometer and maybe a
tone on the line in order to :
(a) determine where the bad joint is
(b) work out which pair is yours when they get to that junction box with
the bad link in it.

I called them again Friday just gone and was told
it'd be fixed by today, it's still not fixed. I got a
text today saying they're "sorry, but we're still
trying to fix your fault. We'll be in touch as soon
as we've got any news." Should I expect better than
this? Or do I have to lump it because I've got a
connection to the web, it's just very slow?


You should expect better.

The problem is that the loop is you - AAISP- BT wholesale-BT
openreach-the actual engineer on the job .

The engineer is the key. All that bureaucracy is just bovine
excremental overhead. In the end if the engineer can get to each end of
the line with his kit, and then remake all the joints or even swap pairs
back to the exchange, the job will get done.

Really you should try and arrange a key with a neighbour and an envelope
for the BT engineer telling him where the sockets are, and where the
coffee and biscuits are, or insist that he phones you directly before he
arrives in order that you can drive home and be there when he arrives.



I don't mind arranging to be there, I just need a bit of notice!


I usally get plenty of notice since they pre-book appointments.

Anyway, I got a text this morning saying they've now fixed it,
I'll give it a try when I get home.


:-)
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) If a man stands in a forest and no woman is around
(")_(") is he still wrong?

 




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