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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

phone socket wiring



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 8th 14, 06:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Gordon Freeman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39
Default phone socket wiring

I decided to replace my old style master socket with an NTE5 one so I could
fit one of these here much vaunted filtered faceplates, but the socket came
with no instructions at all, just two connections marked A and B. The old
socket has a blue/white wire on 5 and a white/blue one on 2. Comparing the
two circuit boards it looks like A = 5 and B = 2, is that right?

Another thing, is the colouring on wires always used systematically or does
it vary by installation? I ask becaase the ADSL faceplate did come with
instructions and they say that when wiring in an extension you should
connect the blue/white wire to 2 and the white/blue one to 5 which is the
opposite of my existing master socket. (Or does the numbering scheme vary
on different pieces of kit?)


--
__________________________________________________ _____

A young lad was taken by his mother to the Temple at Wong Tai Sin.
He shook the tsim and took the stick to the fortune teller, who said:
"You will have a long life, happiness... but not much money.
You will have success... but nobody will know.
You will create great things... but others will get the credit.
You will be beautiful in your heart... but not in your looks.
It is your destiny to be an engineer."
__________________________________________________ _____
  #2  
Old November 8th 14, 07:07 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 182
Default phone socket wiring

On 08/11/2014 18:49, Gordon Freeman wrote:
I decided to replace my old style master socket with an NTE5 one so I could
fit one of these here much vaunted filtered faceplates, but the socket came
with no instructions at all, just two connections marked A and B. The old
socket has a blue/white wire on 5 and a white/blue one on 2. Comparing the
two circuit boards it looks like A = 5 and B = 2, is that right?

Another thing, is the colouring on wires always used systematically or does
it vary by installation? I ask becaase the ADSL faceplate did come with
instructions and they say that when wiring in an extension you should
connect the blue/white wire to 2 and the white/blue one to 5 which is the
opposite of my existing master socket. (Or does the numbering scheme vary
on different pieces of kit?)



Is this helpful
http://www.kitz.co.uk/adsl/socket.htm
Regards
David
  #3  
Old November 8th 14, 09:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 216
Default phone socket wiring

On Sat, 8 Nov 2014 18:49:48 +0000 (UTC), Gordon Freeman
wrote:

I decided to replace my old style master socket with an NTE5 one so I could
fit one of these here much vaunted filtered faceplates, but the socket came
with no instructions at all, just two connections marked A and B. The old
socket has a blue/white wire on 5 and a white/blue one on 2. Comparing the
two circuit boards it looks like A = 5 and B = 2, is that right?

Another thing, is the colouring on wires always used systematically or does
it vary by installation? I ask becaase the ADSL faceplate did come with
instructions and they say that when wiring in an extension you should
connect the blue/white wire to 2 and the white/blue one to 5 which is the
opposite of my existing master socket. (Or does the numbering scheme vary
on different pieces of kit?)


Yes, what you have done is right.

In a domestic situation it doesn't really matter which colour pair you
use although convention dictates you use the blue pair first, then if
you have a second or subsequent lines you use orange green and brown
pairs in that order. The list goes on but you are unlikely to
encounter more than 4 pair cables in a domestic setting.

What is more important is that you don't split the pairs, always use
the same colour (plus white) as the second conductor of the pair.
This is because these are mutually twisted to improve interference
immunity, and reduce cross-talk.




--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #4  
Old November 9th 14, 08:56 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Andrews[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default phone socket wiring

On 08/11/2014 18:49, Gordon Freeman wrote:
I decided to replace my old style master socket with an NTE5 one so I could
fit one of these here much vaunted filtered faceplates, but the socket came
with no instructions at all, just two connections marked A and B. The old
socket has a blue/white wire on 5 and a white/blue one on 2. Comparing the
two circuit boards it looks like A = 5 and B = 2, is that right?

Another thing, is the colouring on wires always used systematically or does
it vary by installation? I ask becaase the ADSL faceplate did come with
instructions and they say that when wiring in an extension you should
connect the blue/white wire to 2 and the white/blue one to 5 which is the
opposite of my existing master socket. (Or does the numbering scheme vary
on different pieces of kit?)


Others have already commented on the wiring methodology. One possible
reason there were no instructions with your master socket is that the
master socket belongs to your service provider and they (in theory!) are
the only people who should change it and therefore know how to do it.
That said its often done and doesn't cause any issues if done correctly!

Peter
  #5  
Old November 11th 14, 12:52 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 216
Default phone socket wiring

On Mon, 10 Nov 2014 23:59:15 +0000 (UTC), Gordon Freeman
wrote:

Peter Andrews wrote:

One possible
reason there were no instructions with your master socket is that the
master socket belongs to your service provider and they (in theory!) are
the only people who should change it and therefore know how to do it.
That said its often done and doesn't cause any issues if done correctly!


Oops! Oh well it's done now, sadly it has made zero difference to the
connection speed or SNR I am getting! Maybe it will improve line
stability though, it's too early to tell. When I was comparing the old-
style socket's innards to the NTE5 the only electrical difference I could
see was that the old one had a surge protector, though I'm not sure how
that was supposed to work, it looks rather like a small fat capacitor. The
ADSL faceplate innards are sealed behind plastic rivets though so I don't
know how that differs from the microfilter I was using before as I didn't
feel inclined to break it open unnecessarily.



If you think about the topography:

Without the central faceplate filter the ADSL signal is split and goes
to all your extension sockets then a filter at each active socket is
required.

With the faceplate filter the ADSL RF signal is stopped from reaching
the extension wiring.

If there is no extension wiring, there is little to be gained apart
from ascetics.

I use an ordinary dongle type filter as a central filter it doesn't
look pretty.



--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #6  
Old November 11th 14, 08:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 752
Default phone socket wiring

"Gordon Freeman" wrote in message
...
Peter Andrews wrote:

One possible
reason there were no instructions with your master socket
is that the
master socket belongs to your service provider and they
(in theory!) are
the only people who should change it and therefore know
how to do it.
That said its often done and doesn't cause any issues if
done correctly!


Oops! Oh well it's done now, sadly it has made zero
difference to the
connection speed or SNR I am getting! Maybe it will
improve line
stability though, it's too early to tell. When I was
comparing the old-
style socket's innards to the NTE5 the only electrical
difference I could
see was that the old one had a surge protector, though I'm
not sure how
that was supposed to work, it looks rather like a small
fat capacitor. The
ADSL faceplate innards are sealed behind plastic rivets
though so I don't
know how that differs from the microfilter I was using
before as I didn't
feel inclined to break it open unnecessarily.



It will likely only make a difference if you have any
extension wiring that can act as an aerial as the filtering
is only on the bell wire (assuming your extension wiring
still has a bell wire.)

I obtained a vDSL iPlate through eBay for not much money and
fitted that for a neighbour (I am on cable) whereafter
Speedtest showed a download speed increase of over 50%. I am
told though - cannot vouch for it - that said plate not only
has a filter but is also a line rebalancer.


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


  #7  
Old November 11th 14, 08:32 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default phone socket wiring

On 11/11/2014 08:15, Woody wrote:

I obtained a vDSL iPlate through eBay for not much money and
fitted that for a neighbour (I am on cable) whereafter
Speedtest showed a download speed increase of over 50%. I am
told though - cannot vouch for it - that said plate not only
has a filter but is also a line rebalancer.


I also got a roughly 50% speed increase on a rural line after applying
just the bellwire hack. The internal phone wiring was very simple single
line so I was surprised that it made such a big difference.

We are fairly close to a powerful TV/radio transmitter...
(not that it allows decent DAB reception)

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #8  
Old November 11th 14, 10:09 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Nemo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default phone socket wiring

On 11/11/2014 00:52, Graham. wrote:
If there is no extension wiring, there is little to be gained apart
from ascetics.


I think you've mis-spoken there, probably meant *aesthetics*.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ascetic

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/aesthetic?s=t
  #9  
Old November 11th 14, 12:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
George Weston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 467
Default phone socket wiring

On 11/11/2014 08:32, Martin Brown wrote:
On 11/11/2014 08:15, Woody wrote:

I obtained a vDSL iPlate through eBay for not much money and
fitted that for a neighbour (I am on cable) whereafter
Speedtest showed a download speed increase of over 50%. I am
told though - cannot vouch for it - that said plate not only
has a filter but is also a line rebalancer.


I also got a roughly 50% speed increase on a rural line after applying
just the bellwire hack. The internal phone wiring was very simple single
line so I was surprised that it made such a big difference.

We are fairly close to a powerful TV/radio transmitter...
(not that it allows decent DAB reception)

As others have said, it's the internal extension wiring (if you have
any) that acts as an antenna and slows down your broadband speed.
An i-Plate will help in that respect but the best way of obtaining the
maximum speed for your line would be to get rid of all extension wiring,
fit a two-outlet filtered socket (one with a socket for phone and the
other for broadband) and run everything you use just from the master
socket. If you have extension phone requirements, do like many of us and
get a DECT wireless system.

  #10  
Old November 11th 14, 01:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,728
Default phone socket wiring

On 11/11/14 12:39, George Weston wrote:
If you have extension phone requirements, do like many of us and get a
DECT wireless system.


....or use a old fashioned analogue or hybrid PABX..




--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. - Erwin Knoll
 




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