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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 11th 17, 08:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 216
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

On Sunday, 11 June 2017 19:13:13 UTC+1, 7 wrote:
thesimpsons wrote:

I've just noticed using.
http://www.dslchecker.bt.com/adsl/adslchecker.welcome
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.

I've not noticed this before, is this the same in other areas?
Having done a little research an average figure of 500 is mentioned for
connection, depending on distance from the cabinet.
Will there be many takers?
Fred S



This service relies on krone tool master bation nation principles
of luring customers with fake fibre and then by slight of hand
deliver a copper cable into the building with
the help of a krone tool master baiter.

A 10gbit or higher data rate fibre arrives at a cabinet,
its broken into dozens of
copper internet wires and fed to the building
by falsely marketing g.slow as g.fast fibre and installed
into the premises by someone master bating with a krone tool.

Naturally dim wits are unable to lick the copper wires
and tell if the upload speeds are same as downloads speed
and just fall back wards and sign on the dotted line.

Whoosh!

All the moneeey is gone now and you now have exactly the same
thing as you had before - copper delivered services,
fitted by master baiting with a krone tool
but paying 5000 for the service for a slight improvement
in speed.

While your neighbour with Hyperoptic, Gigaclear, B4RN,
etc can get 1 gigabit symmetric pure fibre (equal
upload and download speeds) to 3% of UK household with
real fibre (no copper anywhere) entering the building
for under 50.


Neighbour? You can't serve a business near me where BT and non BT fibre passes metres from the boundary of the premises. The nearest "neighbour" you do serve is over a hundred miles away in some cherry picked location you do operate in.

You can't get fibre up to premises round here - you're the w**ker!


So g.slow service is 100x pricier and hardly different
to ordering two ADSL line and bonding it.

Waaat a fscking result eh?


  #12  
Old June 11th 17, 08:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Vir Campestris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

On 11/06/2017 07:33, thesimpsons wrote:
I've just noticed using.
http://www.dslchecker.bt.com/adsl/adslchecker.welcome
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.

I've not noticed this before, is this the same in other areas?
Having done a little research an average figure of 500 is mentioned for
connection, depending on distance from the cabinet.
Will there be many takers?
Fred S


When BT finally got their arses in gear and installed FTTC into our
village much to my pleasant surprise they opted to run a fibre right to
our front door.

It was less of a surprise that it took two months to get inside...

The cost was covered by Connecting Cambridgeshire. Some people got FTTC,
a few of us got FTTP. I have been unable to determine the reasons for
particular connections.

Andy
  #13  
Old June 11th 17, 11:59 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
7[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 259
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

R. Mark Clayton wrote:

thesimpsons wrote:

I've just noticed using.
http://www.dslchecker.bt.com/adsl/adslchecker.welcome
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.

I've not noticed this before, is this the same in other areas?
Having done a little research an average figure of 500 is mentioned
for connection, depending on distance from the cabinet.
Will there be many takers?
Fred S



This service relies on krone tool master bation nation principles
of luring customers with fake fibre and then by slight of hand
deliver a copper cable into the building with
the help of a krone tool master baiter.

A 10gbit or higher data rate fibre arrives at a cabinet,
its broken into dozens of
copper internet wires and fed to the building
by falsely marketing g.slow as g.fast fibre and installed
into the premises by someone master bating with a krone tool.

Naturally dim wits are unable to lick the copper wires
and tell if the upload speeds are same as downloads speed
and just fall back wards and sign on the dotted line.

Whoosh!

All the moneeey is gone now and you now have exactly the same
thing as you had before - copper delivered services,
fitted by master baiting with a krone tool
but paying 5000 for the service for a slight improvement
in speed.

While your neighbour with Hyperoptic, Gigaclear, B4RN,
etc can get 1 gigabit symmetric pure fibre (equal
upload and download speeds) to 3% of UK household with
real fibre (no copper anywhere) entering the building
for under 50.


Neighbour? You can't serve a business near me where BT and non BT fibre
passes metres from the boundary of the premises. The nearest "neighbour"
you do serve is over a hundred miles away in some cherry picked location
you do operate in.

You can't get fibre up to premises round here - you're the w**ker!



Err..

I don't wink that badly, however I do master bait a lot to make up
for any deficiencies..


So g.slow service is 100x pricier and hardly different
to ordering two ADSL line and bonding it.

Waaat a fscking result eh?


  #14  
Old June 12th 17, 11:12 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Theo[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

thesimpsons wrote:
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.


Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?
Haven't they realised it isn't copper and there's plenty of bandwidth to go
round in either direction?

Or does Openreach FTTP still go through some pseudo-copper infrastructure at
some point (like DOCSIS does)?

Theo
  #15  
Old June 12th 17, 03:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 568
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!


"Theo" wrote in message
...
thesimpsons wrote:
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.


Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?
Haven't they realised it isn't copper and there's plenty of
bandwidth to go
round in either direction?

Or does Openreach FTTP still go through some pseudo-copper
infrastructure at
some point (like DOCSIS does)?



I think it is more to do with statistical usage. Most users will send
little data - a surfing request for instance - but will download a lot
like films and music etc.

I don't know but I suspect even with FTTP there is still contention.



--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #16  
Old June 12th 17, 04:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

On Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:25:07 +0100, "Woody"
wrote:


"Theo" wrote in message
...
thesimpsons wrote:
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.


Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?
Haven't they realised it isn't copper and there's plenty of
bandwidth to go
round in either direction?

Or does Openreach FTTP still go through some pseudo-copper
infrastructure at
some point (like DOCSIS does)?



I think it is more to do with statistical usage. Most users will send
little data - a surfing request for instance - but will download a lot
like films and music etc.

I don't know but I suspect even with FTTP there is still contention.


Wasn't it ever thus?
1200/75 baud Prestel et al


--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #17  
Old June 12th 17, 04:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 568
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!


"Graham." wrote in message
...
On Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:25:07 +0100, "Woody"

wrote:


"Theo" wrote in message
...
thesimpsons wrote:
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP
now
available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.

Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?
Haven't they realised it isn't copper and there's plenty of
bandwidth to go
round in either direction?

Or does Openreach FTTP still go through some pseudo-copper
infrastructure at
some point (like DOCSIS does)?



I think it is more to do with statistical usage. Most users will
send
little data - a surfing request for instance - but will download a
lot
like films and music etc.

I don't know but I suspect even with FTTP there is still contention.


Wasn't it ever thus?
1200/75 baud Prestel et al


--

Ah, memories......




--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #18  
Old June 12th 17, 05:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Burns[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 138
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

Woody wrote:

Theo wrote:


Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?


I think it is more to do with statistical usage. Most users will send
little data - a surfing request for instance - but will download a lot
like films and music etc.


But it just means the upstreams of all their links all the way from the
fibre cab, to the exchange, to the ISP will be underutilised, some
people want to upload stuff, do backups, video conferencing etc.



  #19  
Old June 12th 17, 05:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Furniss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

Woody wrote:
"Theo" wrote in message
...
thesimpsons wrote:
That all the fibre cabinets in my area (01934) now state, FTTP
now available on demand, with 330 down and 30 up.


Why oh why are they persisting with this 11:1 down/up ratio?
Haven't they realised it isn't copper and there's plenty of
bandwidth to go round in either direction?

Or does Openreach FTTP still go through some pseudo-copper
infrastructure at some point (like DOCSIS does)?



I think it is more to do with statistical usage. Most users will
send little data - a surfing request for instance - but will download
a lot like films and music etc.

I don't know but I suspect even with FTTP there is still contention.


AIUI (may be wrong/outdated) "normal" fttp uses gpon which is 2.4 gig
down and 1.2 up. This is split passively - I don't know how much in
practice, but any more than 7 and 330mbit is going to be contended.

Openreach seem to sell higher upload products and note everything is
described as "up to" even though there is no distance factor for gpon
each modem gets the full 2.4 gbit.

http://www.openreach.co.uk/orpg/home...loadPricing.do

You can get to fttp pricing from above.
  #20  
Old June 12th 17, 06:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Burns[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 138
Default BT Fibre Availability - To the Premises!

Andy Furniss wrote:

AIUI (may be wrong/outdated) "normal" fttp uses gpon which is 2.4 gig
down and 1.2 up. This is split passively - I don't know how much in
practice, but any more than 7 and 330mbit is going to be contended.


If they provide FTTP because they can't provide FTTC, then yes I assume
it's optically split and probably using multi "colour" lasers for
different subscribers sharing a fibre ...

But do they do all that for FTTPoD? I'd have though the CPE might just
be an optical to copper ethernet bridge with the far end of the fibre in
a switch port in the FTTC cabinet?

 




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