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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 4th 17, 10:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Theo[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

NY wrote:
I've never lived anywhere that has had sufficiently good mobile reception
to make getting rid of a landline even remotely feasible.


I wonder... does anyone make cellular terminals that can also use VOIP or
PSTN?

I'm thinking of the kind of failover you get on routers, but for voice
instead.

No VOIP connection? Fail over to cellular.
No mobile signal? Fail over to PSTN.
(or whatever set of rules you prefer)

Would probably need to come with an external antenna or GSM radio so you can
mount it in the optimal place for signal reception (instead of hanging the
phone out the window).

Something could probably be hacked up with Asterisk and a Bluetooth phone on
the windowsill, but maybe this is a product.

Theo
  #12  
Old August 4th 17, 10:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 585
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.


"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
"Andrew" wrote in message
news
On 03/08/2017 19:25, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
Been to someone's place today, where their ADSL broadband works
fine but no dial tone. So disconnected all, and metered across the
A/B pair where the drop wire comes in.

Less than a volt. Is this a fault?

The abode doesn't have any wired telephones - the multiple
residents tend to use their mobile phones, so I'm suspecting the
contract might be 'broadband only' - but I've only heard of that
for businesses not residential.

I've sent someone to check for bills etc...


"the multiple residents tend to use their mobile phones,"

This is mentioned on the BT community forum quite frequently.
The moderators say you should try and keep a standard BT phone
plugged into the master socket and make or receive a call
occasionally so that ring voltage stops any dry joints or other
high-resistance problems occurring.

try ringing 17070 and do a line test.


I've never lived anywhere that has had sufficiently good mobile
reception to make getting rid of a landline even remotely feasible.
Where I live now there's only reception on one side of the house, so
I need to remember to go through from my study to the bedroom every
so often in case anyone's sent me a text or a voicemail. There are
days when I have to hang out of the window to get any reception. And
that's in a sizeable village 1/4 mile from a trunk A road, not in a
sparsely-populated area with one farm every couple of miles.

Mobile reception really is *crap* in Yorkshire. The companies spend
all their money implementing 4G and 5G, when they should be spending
it on making sure that everywhere has at least phone and 3G; only
when that has been done should they give even faster mobile
broadband to those in cities who already have fast mobile.

I'm not greedy: I don't expect my mobile broadband speed to be even
as fast as ADSL (8 Mbps), never mind FTTC speeds (30+ Mbps), but I
would like 100% coverage of phone and at least 2 Mbps throughout the
UK.


Ah, like me, another O2 user?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #13  
Old August 4th 17, 10:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 585
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.


"Theo" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:
I've never lived anywhere that has had sufficiently good mobile
reception
to make getting rid of a landline even remotely feasible.


I wonder... does anyone make cellular terminals that can also use
VOIP or
PSTN?

I'm thinking of the kind of failover you get on routers, but for
voice
instead.

No VOIP connection? Fail over to cellular.
No mobile signal? Fail over to PSTN.
(or whatever set of rules you prefer)

Would probably need to come with an external antenna or GSM radio so
you can
mount it in the optimal place for signal reception (instead of
hanging the
phone out the window).

Something could probably be hacked up with Asterisk and a Bluetooth
phone on
the windowsill, but maybe this is a product.



Won't Asterix do something like that?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #14  
Old August 4th 17, 11:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Brian Gregory
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 121
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

On 04/08/2017 21:02, Tweed wrote:

"the multiple residents tend to use their mobile phones,"

This is mentioned on the BT community forum quite frequently.
The moderators say you should try and keep a standard BT phone
plugged into the master socket and make or receive a call
occasionally so that ring voltage stops any dry joints or other
high-resistance problems occurring.

try ringing 17070 and do a line test.


I've never lived anywhere that has had sufficiently good mobile reception to
make getting rid of a landline even remotely feasible. Where I live now
there's only reception on one side of the house, so I need to remember to go
through from my study to the bedroom every so often in case anyone's sent me
a text or a voicemail. There are days when I have to hang out of the window
to get any reception. And that's in a sizeable village 1/4 mile from a trunk
A road, not in a sparsely-populated area with one farm every couple of
miles.

Mobile reception really is *crap* in Yorkshire. The companies spend all
their money implementing 4G and 5G, when they should be spending it on
making sure that everywhere has at least phone and 3G; only when that has
been done should they give even faster mobile broadband to those in cities
who already have fast mobile.

I'm not greedy: I don't expect my mobile broadband speed to be even as fast
as ADSL (8 Mbps), never mind FTTC speeds (30+ Mbps), but I would like 100%
coverage of phone and at least 2 Mbps throughout the UK.



No. If an area doesn't have 3G the best thing is to deploy straight to 4G.
There is no sensible reason these days to go via 3G. 4G uses the spectrum
more efficiently. The amount of spectrum being allocated to 3G is steadily
being reduced and reallocated to 4G.


But voice calls over 4G is only just beginning to happen.
Even if the mobile companies all decided to implement voice calls over
4G now many mobile phones still can't do it.

--

Brian Gregory (in the UK).
To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.
  #15  
Old August 5th 17, 09:58 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 470
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 20:31:24 +0100, "NY" wrote:

I'm not greedy: I don't expect my mobile broadband speed to be even as fast
as ADSL (8 Mbps), never mind FTTC speeds (30+ Mbps), but I would like 100%
coverage of phone and at least 2 Mbps throughout the UK.


The trouble with standardising the infrastructure on a performance
that's just about adequate now is that it'll be considered dismally
inadequate long before it's finished. It took several generations ater
the invention of the telephone before we had anything approaching
complete coverage with voice-quality twisted wires, so it would
probably take a similar amount of time to replace it with anything
else. The minimum requirements for the telephone infrastructure may
have been adequate for a bygone age, but are practically useless for
even the basic things many of us want to do now.

If we're to replace our communications infrastructure, the only way
that makes sense is to replace it with something that will be good for
centuries. If we don't, we'll be continually bodging and replacing
bits of it for the benefit of the few who happen to live in the right
places or have lots of money, while everybody else will have to live
in the past.

Rod.
  #16  
Old August 5th 17, 10:41 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
tim...
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.



"Theo" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:
I've never lived anywhere that has had sufficiently good mobile reception
to make getting rid of a landline even remotely feasible.


I wonder... does anyone make cellular terminals that can also use VOIP or
PSTN?


I think what you are looking for is a picocell

tim



  #17  
Old August 5th 17, 01:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 291
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

"Tweed" wrote in message
news
Mobile reception really is *crap* in Yorkshire. The companies spend all
their money implementing 4G and 5G, when they should be spending it on
making sure that everywhere has at least phone and 3G


No. If an area doesn't have 3G the best thing is to deploy straight to 4G.
There is no sensible reason these days to go via 3G. 4G uses the spectrum
more efficiently. The amount of spectrum being allocated to 3G is steadily
being reduced and reallocated to 4G.


Agreed. But unfortunately the upgrade from 2G (either to 3G or 4G) is very
low priority: I reckon they'll upgrade some of the cities to 5G or even 6G
long before they upgrade the rural areas to even vaguely usable gap-free
coverage of 3G standard.

Does telephone/text piggy-back on whatever data format (2G, 3G, 4G) happens
to be implemented, or is it separate, as in "telephone plus 2G data",
"telephone plus 3G data" etc? Would the implementation of 4G implicitly
improve telephone/text coverage or do both the phone and data systems need
to be updated separately, and could telephone coverage be made less "gappy"
without going to the extra expense of also increasing data speeds, as a
stop-gap measure?

  #18  
Old August 5th 17, 01:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 291
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

"Woody" wrote in message
news
I'm not greedy: I don't expect my mobile broadband speed to be even as
fast as ADSL (8 Mbps), never mind FTTC speeds (30+ Mbps), but I would
like 100% coverage of phone and at least 2 Mbps throughout the UK.


Ah, like me, another O2 user?


No Vodafone. And Orange and 3 are as bad: my wife's tried both networks and
found that they are equally as bad around where we live. Orange used to be
really bad - it was a case of walking up the road to the fifth chestnut tree
to get any reception. Now at least it's been upgraded to hanging out of the
bathroom window ;-)

  #19  
Old August 5th 17, 01:46 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roger Mills
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 275
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

On 04/08/2017 20:14, Andrew wrote:
On 03/08/2017 19:25, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
Been to someone's place today, where their ADSL broadband works fine
but no dial tone. So disconnected all, and metered across the A/B pair
where the drop wire comes in.

Less than a volt. Is this a fault?

The abode doesn't have any wired telephones - the multiple residents
tend to use their mobile phones, so I'm suspecting the contract might
be 'broadband only' - but I've only heard of that for businesses not
residential.

I've sent someone to check for bills etc...


"the multiple residents tend to use their mobile phones,"

This is mentioned on the BT community forum quite frequently.
The moderators say you should try and keep a standard BT phone
plugged into the master socket and make or receive a call
occasionally so that ring voltage stops any dry joints or other
high-resistance problems occurring.

try ringing 17070 and do a line test.


Not too easy if there's no dial tone!
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
  #20  
Old August 5th 17, 01:47 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 291
Default Open circuit voltage on phone line very very low.

"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 20:31:24 +0100, "NY" wrote:

I'm not greedy: I don't expect my mobile broadband speed to be even as
fast
as ADSL (8 Mbps), never mind FTTC speeds (30+ Mbps), but I would like 100%
coverage of phone and at least 2 Mbps throughout the UK.


The trouble with standardising the infrastructure on a performance
that's just about adequate now is that it'll be considered dismally
inadequate long before it's finished. It took several generations ater
the invention of the telephone before we had anything approaching
complete coverage with voice-quality twisted wires, so it would
probably take a similar amount of time to replace it with anything
else. The minimum requirements for the telephone infrastructure may
have been adequate for a bygone age, but are practically useless for
even the basic things many of us want to do now.

If we're to replace our communications infrastructure, the only way
that makes sense is to replace it with something that will be good for
centuries. If we don't, we'll be continually bodging and replacing
bits of it for the benefit of the few who happen to live in the right
places or have lots of money, while everybody else will have to live
in the past.


Good point. I believe that BT's official minimum speed is still 512 kbps -
and I know several people in remote places, several miles up dead-end roads,
who don't get that: they may get 2 Mbps occasionally but mostly they get no
signal at all that the router can detect. I'd rather have a slow but 100%
reliable system than a faster but very intermittent signal. I went to a
client yesterday who has no landline (maybe because he lives in a "lodge
park" where all the houses are chalets raised off the ground and may be
subject to residential caravan restrictions. So he has to rely on a router
that has mobile access. And the connection was atrocious: probably about 512
kbps at best but it kept dropping out every minute or so which made it very
difficult to download any software or access any web sites. I'd be screaming
at the mobile company to improve things (or looking to change networks) but
he just accepts it. A job that probably would have taken about 1/2 hour to
over 2 hours because of all the false starts and aborted downloads - and
because of his insistence of using an obscure
username-and-password-management system which needed a logon and he'd
forgotten the password and we couldn't find a way of requesting a password
reset. Eventually I found that he was using an outdated version which gave
either "bad username and password" or else "can't contact server" errors;
once I'd upgraded it, the username and password were accepted.

 




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