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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 17th 17, 11:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
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Posts: 336
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-42367202

"The UK's digital divide has narrowed but more than one million homes
and offices still struggle to get good broadband, says an Ofcom report."

Tell me about it :-(
  #2  
Old December 18th 17, 01:32 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 204
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 17/12/2017 23:02, Java Jive wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-42367202

"The UK's digital divide has narrowed but more than one million homes
and offices still struggle to get good broadband, says an Ofcom report."

Tell me about it :-(



What's that, a couple of percent? That sounds pretty good to me.

Apparently 7% of people in Scotland do not have mains water, I suspect
as many or more do not have mains sewerage. Is that not more important
than fast broadband.


  #3  
Old December 18th 17, 03:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
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Posts: 269
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On Mon, 18 Dec 2017 13:32:09 +0000, MB coalesced the
vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful
comprehension...

On 17/12/2017 23:02, Java Jive wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-42367202

"The UK's digital divide has narrowed but more than one million homes
and offices still struggle to get good broadband, says an Ofcom report."

Tell me about it :-(



What's that, a couple of percent? That sounds pretty good to me.

Apparently 7% of people in Scotland do not have mains water, I suspect
as many or more do not have mains sewerage. Is that not more important
than fast broadband.


2 birds
1 stone
???
http://archive.google.com/tisp/install.html
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #4  
Old December 18th 17, 04:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 18/12/2017 13:32, MB wrote:
On 17/12/2017 23:02, Java Jive wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-42367202

"The UK's digital divide has narrowed but more than one million homes
and offices still struggle to get good broadband, says an Ofcom report."

Tell me about it :-(



What's that, a couple of percent?* That sounds pretty good to me.


The problem is that most of the money spent upgrading the system
nationwide is spent on improving speeds for those who already get
workable speeds.

Apparently 7% of people in Scotland do not have mains water, I suspect
as many or more do not have mains sewerage.* Is that not more important
than fast broadband.


No, as long as there are safe alternatives. I have mains water, but my
waste goes into a septic tank.



  #5  
Old December 18th 17, 04:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
S Viemeister
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 12/18/2017 11:18 AM, Java Jive wrote:
On 18/12/2017 13:32, MB wrote:
What's that, a couple of percent? That sounds pretty good to me.


The problem is that most of the money spent upgrading the system
nationwide is spent on improving speeds for those who already get
workable speeds.

Indeed. Our speeds are pathetic.

Apparently 7% of people in Scotland do not have mains water, I suspect
as many or more do not have mains sewerage. Is that not more
important than fast broadband.


No, as long as there are safe alternatives. I have mains water, but my
waste goes into a septic tank.

Me, too. And if the water supply fails (as it has in the past) I have
access to an old well.
  #7  
Old December 18th 17, 11:57 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 204
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 18/12/2017 16:18, Java Jive wrote:
The problem is that most of the money spent upgrading the system
nationwide is spent on improving speeds for those who already get
workable speeds.

No, as long as there are safe alternatives.* I have mains water, but my
waste goes into a septic tank.


Are they still allowed, a friend had one but was told it had to be
replaced by what is virtually a small sewage plant under his car park.

It was the cost I was thinking of. Live outside a town and you will
have pay the cost of your own water supply and probably have it tested
every year. You will need also to pay the cost of your own sewage
plant. But if you make enough noise someone will claim that she should
be provided with high speed broadband at the same cost as someone who
had fibre running near his house.

  #8  
Old December 19th 17, 12:00 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
7[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 509
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

Java Jive wrote:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-42367202

"The UK's digital divide has narrowed but more than one million homes
and offices still struggle to get good broadband, says an Ofcom report."

Tell me about it :-(



Offcum is the leading cause of slow progress with rural internet and
instrumental in the creation of UK's digital divide.


https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.ph...ns-ruling.html


"Ofcom's flawed approach was unduly fixated on a ‘make do and mend'
strategy of squeezing economic value out of BT's existing legacy network, "


In short, Offcum have been working illegally on behalf of BT (British Telecum)
to massage copper networks for as long as possible
when in fact, its cheaper to install fibre and even
more cheaper to ditch ADSL and go pure fibre and symmetric DSL.

Average costs about 1/20th of copper for provisioning.
On a per bandwidth costs, the copper is about 200 times
more expensive than fibre to provision.
You don't need brick lined tunnels for starters.
You don't need telephone poles.
You don't need to dig more than 200mm to 1m to lay
fibre because water ingress is not a problem
unlike electrified copper wires.
Maintenance is close to zero as fibre lines
are not struck by lightening.

Add to that greedy landlords and farmers
demanding more money for fibre compared to water
and electricity provisioning. The law is being rectified
as of this month to prevent that.

Its not in the interest of farmers and land owners to oppose
fibre going through their land. They are needed
to wire up mobile phone masts and provide high speed
internet. But the village idiocy only allows the
farming rural community of idiots to hold out their
hand for more cash and bitterly complain they got
no internet, they got no mobile phone signals
when in fact it is they themselves that are responsible
for lack of services by charging different rates for access.
How about getting some education, ditching ALL opposition
to fibre roll out in their area, and may be help
them with a tractor or two to dig the trenches
so that they may deliver fibre faster than anywhere else
in cities?




  #9  
Old December 19th 17, 03:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 18/12/2017 23:57, MB wrote:
On 18/12/2017 16:18, Java Jive wrote:
The problem is that most of the money spent upgrading the system
nationwide is spent on improving speeds for those who already get
workable speeds.

No, as long as there are safe alternatives.* I have mains water, but
my waste goes into a septic tank.


Are they still allowed, a friend had one but was told it had to be
replaced by what is virtually a small sewage plant under his car park.


Septic tanks are everywhere in Scotland, even in some villages, such a
Kyleakin on the Isle Of Skye.

It was the cost I was thinking of.* Live outside a town and you will
have pay the cost of your own water supply and probably have it tested
every year.


You often see pipes coming down from mountain streams.

You will need also to pay the cost of your own sewage
plant.


Nonsense, but you do have to pay occasionally to have a tanker come and
empty a septic tank - some do it every year, others like myself every
few years, ISTR it last cost about £250.

But if you make enough noise someone will claim that she should
be provided with high speed broadband at the same cost as someone who
had fibre running near his house.


You always come up with this "I'm alright Jack" style of posting, and I
always shoot it down in flames, yet you never seem to learn ...

Although we shall shortly be leaving, the EU now defines broadband
internet access as a basic human right. Although to some this may seem
extreme. it actually makes a lot of sense, because ...

The existing services which the internet replaces such as the Post
Office have delivered on a flat rate system for, literally, centuries,
and it doesn't seem fair or just to replace a flat rate system with a
postcode lottery.

Many dealings with local and national government are now being done
online, and some are moving to that being the ONLY way you can
communicate with them - for example, farmers claiming grants, etc. In
this situation, it is unfair that what is thus made a necessity of life
is not supplied on the same flat rate basis as other basic services such
as healthcare, electricity, or water.

As I've posted before, average page weight increases by tens of percent
every year, which means that a low broadband speed that could just about
cope a decade or so ago now provides a dismal and frustrating
experience. This is not because of anything a rural householder has
done, but because the incompetent jerks who write the pages only ever
test them on their own system with high-speed access - if it works on
their manager's PC, it's good to go. Thus unwittingly they contribute
to disenfranchising those in rural areas with ever decreasing performance.

Throughout rural areas, many shops selling basic needs such as food have
either closed or become 'convenience stores' stocking only a very basic
range of necessities, and some of those aren't exactly the best quality
- the last time I bought fresh bread at the local convenience store,
which is supplied by reputable baker in Wick, when back home I tried to
cut it, with a fairly new and still very sharp breadknife, it just
disintegrated into a useless pile of large crumbs - I might have been
able to spread the crumbs on the butter, but I certainly couldn't spread
the butter on the crumbs! Consequently, it is becoming ever more
important to be able to order online from more distant stores and,
hopefully, have them deliver it, though that again is a postcode
lottery. For example, Asda will deliver all over the Highlands, but,
for the most part, I don't much like what they stock, particularly when
it comes to vegetarian items, which are mostly, but not exclusively,
what I eat. The Dingwall Tesco won't deliver beyond Lairg, and I'm just
the far side of it, the Wick branch does Click & Collect, but doesn't
cover Lairg, because that is 'covered' by the Dingwall branch, while the
nearest branch, in Tain, is too small to provide either service. Thus
on my walks around the area's roads, I see Tesco vans almost every day,
including even Saturdays & Sundays, which will pass within half-a-mile
of my house, but won't deliver to it, so I have to make a 100 mile round
trip to get my weekly or fortnightly shop from Dingwall. I've rung
them, complained, and explained that I would be quite happy to pay them
a bit extra to come a bit further, but they won't do it, and instead
suggested that I corrupt their system by giving a postcode in Lairg of a
friend, and putting my postcode on the delivery instructions!

Continuing the postcode lottery theme, rather than the broadband theme,
there are many stores that claim to deliver UK wide, but the moment you
put in a Highland postcode, they slap on a delivery charge that comes to
2 or 3 times the monetary value of what you are ordering, and almost
invariably if nevertheless you order the item, because you need it, it
is always delivered by the most inefficient route possible - it gets
to Inverness within one or two days, then spends a week jolting around
the entire Highlands in a van, just what you want for your new hard
drive, whereas if they just used the Post Office, it would have cost
half the price and taken half the time. This is how deregulation of the
postal system has completely failed rural areas.

It may seem strange to those of us brought up in a time before the era
of mass electronic communication that it should now be thought a
necessity of life, but the practical reality of modern life is that it
is so.
  #10  
Old December 19th 17, 04:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
S Viemeister
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44
Default Million Britons miss out on 'decent' broadband speeds

On 12/19/2017 10:55 AM, Java Jive wrote:

on my walks around the area's roads, I see Tesco vans almost every day,
including even Saturdays & Sundays, which will pass within half-a-mile
of my house, but won't deliver to it, so I have to make a 100 mile round
trip to get my weekly or fortnightly shop from Dingwall. I've rung
them, complained, and explained that I would be quite happy to pay them
a bit extra to come a bit further, but they won't do it, and instead
suggested that I corrupt their system by giving a postcode in Lairg of a
friend, and putting my postcode on the delivery instructions!

Interesting - does that actually work?

Continuing the postcode lottery theme, rather than the broadband theme,
there are many stores that claim to deliver UK wide, but the moment you
put in a Highland postcode, they slap on a delivery charge that comes to
2 or 3 times the monetary value of what you are ordering, and almost
invariably if nevertheless you order the item, because you need it, it
is always delivered by the most inefficient route possible - it gets
to Inverness within one or two days, then spends a week jolting around
the entire Highlands in a van, just what you want for your new hard
drive, whereas if they just used the Post Office, it would have cost
half the price and taken half the time. This is how deregulation of the
postal system has completely failed rural areas.

Much Amazon stuff, and Lakeland, too, comes via Hermes. When the
tracking on a Hermes delivery says 'out for delivery' (from Perth!) I
know that it will be at least a week before it finally turns up,
sometimes much longer, because from Perth it goes to Inverness (about
100 miles south of us), then eventually goes to a carrier which doesn't
deliver every day.
 




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