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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

POTS line to/from VoIP



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 27th 18, 07:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 550
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On Wednesday, 27 June 2018 00:12:51 UTC+1, Bob Eager wrote:
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 23:25:10 +0100, Roger wrote:

However, if you dont need to have a landline phone plugged into
something why do you need an FXO port? If you have Csipsimple, simply
transfer your landline number to sipgate and use csipsimple on your
mobiles registered to your sipgate number when at home - no forwading
costs involved. Just a £40 resgitatraion cost to transfer your landline
number. If you have a reasonbable data plan you can also use csipsimple
when away from the home (or alternatively just get the sipgate
voicemails sent to your email account so you know whenever someone has
left a voicemail)


I wanted the FXO port because I have a BT landline for DSL. One day I
will move it...

Meanwhile, I get free calls at weekends, etc. plus very cheap calls via a
third party provider the rest of the time.


Is that via prefix - if so who with? Vodafone fixed did that until March, but pulled the product :-(

VoIP is mainly used for
incoming calls.


  #12  
Old June 27th 18, 08:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bob Eager[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:22:22 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

On Wednesday, 27 June 2018 00:12:51 UTC+1, Bob Eager wrote:
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 23:25:10 +0100, Roger wrote:

However, if you dont need to have a landline phone plugged into
something why do you need an FXO port? If you have Csipsimple, simply
transfer your landline number to sipgate and use csipsimple on your
mobiles registered to your sipgate number when at home - no forwading
costs involved. Just a £40 resgitatraion cost to transfer your
landline number. If you have a reasonbable data plan you can also use
csipsimple when away from the home (or alternatively just get the
sipgate voicemails sent to your email account so you know whenever
someone has left a voicemail)


I wanted the FXO port because I have a BT landline for DSL. One day I
will move it...

Meanwhile, I get free calls at weekends, etc. plus very cheap calls via
a third party provider the rest of the time.


Is that via prefix - if so who with? Vodafone fixed did that until
March, but pulled the product :-(

VoIP is mainly used for incoming calls.


The base supplier is BT. The prefix is 18185.
  #13  
Old June 27th 18, 10:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Roger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 89
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On 27/06/2018 00:12, Bob Eager wrote:
On Tue, 26 Jun 2018 23:25:10 +0100, Roger wrote:

However, if you dont need to have a landline phone plugged into
something why do you need an FXO port? If you have Csipsimple, simply
transfer your landline number to sipgate and use csipsimple on your
mobiles registered to your sipgate number when at home - no forwading
costs involved. Just a £40 resgitatraion cost to transfer your landline
number. If you have a reasonbable data plan you can also use csipsimple
when away from the home (or alternatively just get the sipgate
voicemails sent to your email account so you know whenever someone has
left a voicemail)


I wanted the FXO port because I have a BT landline for DSL. One day I
will move it...

Meanwhile, I get free calls at weekends, etc. plus very cheap calls via a
third party provider the rest of the time. VoIP is mainly used for
incoming calls.

In that ase I wold recommend a Gigaset N300A. I dont use the landline
connection on mine anymore but you can connect landline and configure up
to 6 voip providers and assign incoming/outgoing calls on the differnt
providers to different handsets if you wish.

My incoming landline no is now with sipgate but I use betamax for
outgoing (costs me €10 every 5 months or so) and have also got my office
line coming into to a separate handset for when I work from home.

Much less hassle to configure than a spa and never any echo issues that
I used to get - trade off is its not quite so configurable but it does
everything I need reliably.
  #14  
Old June 28th 18, 12:24 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Pancho
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On 26/06/2018 23:25, Roger wrote:
On 26/06/2018 21:02, David Higton wrote:
Clearly, from what I've read, I'm not the only person to have wanted
to convert their POTS land line to VoiP.* However, I'm unable to find
a solution that is currently available in the UK.

It would be convenient to receive POTS calls on our mobiles while at
home.* Being able to receive them if we're not at home is absolutely
NOT essential, but might be a nice-to-have (I have OpenVPN working).
I use CSipSimple.* I also have a VoIP PAYG service from Sipgate, but
it never gets used, nor do we normally call out on the land line,
because mobile calls are free (more inclusive minutes than we ever
use) but calls from Sipgate and the land line are not.

I believe CSipSimple will register to more than one server, so an
appliance would be fine, i.e. a simple box that has an FXO port and
provides a SIP UAS+UAC; but I've never found one to exist.

Next obvious solution is a Raspberry Pi and Rasterisk, with an FXO
adapter.* I've installed Asterisk numerous times, so I'm happy doing
it.* The problem is that I haven't found an FXO adapter currently
available in the UK, either new (preferred) or second hand.* Perhaps
I haven't used the right search terms.

Any useful suggestions would be welcome!

Dave

I converted 2 years ago and use a gigaset base station for all my VOIP
lines. Its much simplier to set up than my old SPAs and much more reliable.

However, if you dont need to have a landline phone plugged into
something why do you need an FXO port? If you have Csipsimple, simply
transfer your landline number to sipgate and use csipsimple on your
mobiles registered to your sipgate number when at home - no forwading
costs involved. Just a £40 resgitatraion cost to transfer your landline
number.


This is an answer and it is what I did successfully, but there might be
a few obstacles. Firstly can you port a POTS BT number to Sipgate
without dropping the Internet connection too? Secondly if you do drop
the line completely you may have to pay a largish reconnection fee if
you ever wish to reconnect the line with a new number, even if it is an
internet only line. I think porting the number makes the line strange
enough to require a BT technician visit to reconnect it.

It would be cheaper to just get a new Sipgate number and use that as
your new landline number. Just stop using the old one and tell everyone
you have changed number.
  #15  
Old June 28th 18, 02:28 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 550
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On Wednesday, 27 June 2018 19:22:47 UTC+1, Bob Eager wrote:
On Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:22:22 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


SNIP


Meanwhile, I get free calls at weekends, etc. plus very cheap calls via
a third party provider the rest of the time.


Is that via prefix - if so who with? Vodafone fixed did that until
March, but pulled the product :-(

VoIP is mainly used for incoming calls.


The base supplier is BT. The prefix is 18185.


Thanks. 5p connection charge and dearer than Voipfone.
  #16  
Old June 28th 18, 03:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bob Eager[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 05:28:51 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

On Wednesday, 27 June 2018 19:22:47 UTC+1, Bob Eager wrote:
On Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:22:22 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


SNIP


Meanwhile, I get free calls at weekends, etc. plus very cheap calls
via a third party provider the rest of the time.

Is that via prefix - if so who with? Vodafone fixed did that until
March, but pulled the product :-(

VoIP is mainly used for incoming calls.


The base supplier is BT. The prefix is 18185.


Thanks. 5p connection charge and dearer than Voipfone.


I just knew that was the only reason you asked.
  #17  
Old June 29th 18, 12:02 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Theo[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

David Higton wrote:
Next obvious solution is a Raspberry Pi and Rasterisk, with an FXO
adapter. I've installed Asterisk numerous times, so I'm happy doing
it. The problem is that I haven't found an FXO adapter currently
available in the UK, either new (preferred) or second hand. Perhaps
I haven't used the right search terms.


Once upon a time I did some digging around at this question. I /think/ it
should be possible to use a USB WinModem as an FXO adapter, given it's
basically an ADC, a DAC and a hookswitch relay.

I did some poking at what WinModems were available and found some Conexant
chips. There were Linux drivers that were extremely tumbleweed and I'm not
convinced they actually worked, even if they were ported forward from Linux
2.4 or whatever they were written for.

That was ~5 years ago and I can't imagine the driver situation has
improved since. But they're still on ebay for a few pounds if you're
feeling adventurous.

Theo
  #18  
Old June 29th 18, 02:20 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

David Higton wrote:
Next obvious solution is a Raspberry Pi and Rasterisk, with an FXO
adapter. I've installed Asterisk numerous times, so I'm happy doing
it. The problem is that I haven't found an FXO adapter currently
available in the UK, either new (preferred) or second hand. Perhaps
I haven't used the right search terms.


Once upon a time I did some digging around at this question. I /think/ it
should be possible to use a USB WinModem as an FXO adapter, given it's
basically an ADC, a DAC and a hookswitch relay.

I did some poking at what WinModems were available and found some Conexant
chips. There were Linux drivers that were extremely tumbleweed and I'm not
convinced they actually worked, even if they were ported forward from Linux
2.4 or whatever they were written for.

That was ~5 years ago and I can't imagine the driver situation has
improved since. But they're still on ebay for a few pounds if you're
feeling adventurous.

Theo


I think David envisaged the adapter to be a stand-alone unit on the
network rather than something connected to the Pi's GPIO or USB, but
didn't know to look for an "ATA" (BICBW)

David, I have had RASPBX running on a Pi here at home for four years
or so and only ever had one fatal crash.

The advice I would give you is to have a minimal build on the SD card
just to boot the Pi then hand over to spinning rust or SSD

Here is my "rack" (intended for letters)
L-R Router - Switch - PAP-2 (2xFXS) SPA-3000 (1xFXS+1xFXO) -
Raspberry Pi - 2.5 inch drive with IDEUSB adapter.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/g3zvt/fuq3iH
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #19  
Old June 29th 18, 06:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
David Higton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

In message
Theo wrote:

David Higton wrote:
Next obvious solution is a Raspberry Pi and Rasterisk, with an FXO
adapter. I've installed Asterisk numerous times, so I'm happy doing
it. The problem is that I haven't found an FXO adapter currently
available in the UK, either new (preferred) or second hand. Perhaps
I haven't used the right search terms.


Once upon a time I did some digging around at this question. I /think/ it
should be possible to use a USB WinModem as an FXO adapter, given it's
basically an ADC, a DAC and a hookswitch relay.

I did some poking at what WinModems were available and found some Conexant
chips. There were Linux drivers that were extremely tumbleweed and I'm not
convinced they actually worked, even if they were ported forward from Linux
2.4 or whatever they were written for.

That was ~5 years ago and I can't imagine the driver situation has
improved since. But they're still on ebay for a few pounds if you're
feeling adventurous.


Interesting, Theo... you've sent me along an interesting train of
thought.

(The thought had crossed my mind of building what I want from scratch,
which I could do, although it would take me ages, but would completely
fail to be approved - the trick being to engineer it well enough that
the phone company never experiences a problem!)

There are USB data/fax/voice modems still around, some of them very
cheap. But how exactly does one of them work as a voice modem? How
is the voice transmitted? As an isochronous stream? Does it require
an AT command to turn the voice functionality on?

Dave
  #20  
Old June 30th 18, 02:13 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Theo[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default POTS line to/from VoIP

David Higton wrote:
Interesting, Theo... you've sent me along an interesting train of
thought.

(The thought had crossed my mind of building what I want from scratch,
which I could do, although it would take me ages, but would completely
fail to be approved - the trick being to engineer it well enough that
the phone company never experiences a problem!)


I'm not sure there's an approvals process for telephony equipment these
days, unlike the old BABT. You can self-certify it as CE approved and
that's that. I don't think you need a Notified Body to test it for you, but
of course the phone company might notice if it's awful.

If you want to play, using it on the FXS port of an ATA (or a PABX) is a way
to have a 'local PSTN' to experiment with.

There are USB data/fax/voice modems still around, some of them very
cheap. But how exactly does one of them work as a voice modem? How
is the voice transmitted? As an isochronous stream? Does it require
an AT command to turn the voice functionality on?


The non-Winmodems have AT commands that put them in voice mode. Since
they're usually on the end of RS232 links (directly or over USB), they may
not be able to handle continuous voice communication but voice can be enough
to, for instance, set voicemail prompts and retrieve messages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_modem_command_set

I think USB WinModems are essentially soundcards with a one-bit GPIO for the
hookswitch. However I'm not sure if they support the regular USB audio
standard - the picture is muddied because people buy them for modem
functionality which means they mean the softmodem codecs when they talk about
drivers, while we don't care about that.

It seems the Conexant ones have ALSA audio drivers:
http://www.linuxant.com/drivers/index.php
which would suggest you can use them as a soundcard.

'Direct access arrangement' (DAA) is the generic term for the analogue PSTN
bits of a modem - once you have that you have regular audio and some
settings you can wiggle, potentially easier than a USB softmodem, eg:
https://www.semiconductorstore.com/c...dproduct=13978
- that also takes care of setting the exchange on fire.

I suppose you could then hook that up to a soundcard (USB or otherwise) and
configure Asterisk to use it.

I also came across:
https://github.com/pgid69/bcm63xx-phone
which is relevant plumbing but going the wrong way (FXS not FXO).

Theo
 




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