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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Sky routers



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 18th 18, 11:45 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Theo[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Sky routers

DrTeeth wrote:
Hi,

My neighbour has a Sky service. For some reason it looks like he has
two routers/Wi-Fi access points judging by what I see when I use a
program to show the channels on 2.4/5 GHz. Why is this? I do not have
any problems with it, just curious.


It's also possible the Sky router's wifi isn't very good, and he's bought a
second router/access point to increase the wifi strength. He may not have
dug into the Sky settings to turn off the first's wifi.

Theo
  #12  
Old August 18th 18, 01:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 689
Default Sky routers

Andy Burns wrote:
NY wrote:

Do you find that the range of 5 GHz covers the whole house?


5.2GHz is a mixed blessing, faster and other people's signals don't
travel so well therefore less interference, but your own signals don't
travel so well either, but generally good within a house.

I name the 2.4 and 5.2GHz radios separately, so I know which devices are
configured to use which SSID, I have used the laptop on 5.2GHz out in
the car.

I found that it would cover one room either side of the one with the
router in, and the room directly below, but it wouldn't go diagonally
or through one room to get to the next one.


Not found it travels that poorly here.


WiFi is only predictably good within a room. The signal might or might
not pass through walls, depending on their material and thickness.
Modern houses with stud & plaster walls are usually OK, whereas old
houses with brick or stone construction and where the walls have been
re-plastered with metal mesh fixed to the stonework as a foundation
layer - generally such walls will block the signal.

So the only guaranteed solution is to install Ethernet cable, and
connect a wireless access point in each room if you have devices that
only use WiFi.

--
Graham J

  #13  
Old August 18th 18, 01:35 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 74
Default Sky routers

On 18/08/18 13:26, Graham J wrote:

So the only guaranteed solution is to install Ethernet cable, and
connect a wireless access point in each room if you have devices that
only use WiFi.


Indeed. Although as I've said, we're only in a small 1-bedroom flat
here, so the router, which is wall-mounted just inside the door to the
living room, more than covers the whole of the area. We still have
Ethernet everywhere though, the only devices we have that *have* to be
connected by wireless are the phones/tablets, and they only need it
sporadically.


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #14  
Old August 18th 18, 02:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
stephen
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Posts: 381
Default Sky routers

On Fri, 17 Aug 2018 22:26:47 +0100, "NY" wrote:

"MissRiaElaine" wrote in message
...
On 17/08/18 19:28, Stephen wrote:

Some routers support / allow separate SSIDs for the customer and for
guest access?


Indeed, that's what we do. Our Sky router normally just has the 5GHz band
enabled, but if we get visitors that want to use wi-fi, we enable 2.4GHz
(which has a simpler password) for them to use, and switch it off again
when they leave.

The Kindle e-reader we have only seems to support 2.4GHz as well, so we
have to switch it on when we want to download a new book, but otherwise
the band stays switched off. There is only one other user on 5GHz anywhere
in range and they're several channels away, so we don't get any problems.


Do you find that the range of 5 GHz covers the whole house? I found that it
would cover one room either side of the one with the router in, and the room
directly below, but it wouldn't go diagonally or through one room to get to
the next one.

We have a single Ethernet fed Ubiquiti Unifi AP on a 1st floor ceiling
over a central landing covering an extended 3 bed semi + loft.
- signal is good enough to use WiFi in the garden around 15m and 1
internal breezeblock + 1 external brick walls away. Some metallised
plasterboard but only in the extension.
- there are typically 20 to 25 devices registered on WiFi +10 on
Ethernet

The default is 5GHz on devices that support both and get a reasonable
signal as 1st choice and I havent noticed any big gaps.
- channels are set to "standard" speed - no point blasting signals
across 3 to 5 nominal channels and accepting all the added
interference as we dont need the throughput - iplayer to several
devices at the same time works fine
- that said the AP uses the same SSID on both frequencies and the 5GHz
capable devices are happy to flip to 2.4 so not sure sure whether I
would see much difference if some flip to 2.4G.

There is a nominal 2:1 range advantage for 2.4 GHz according to the
the standards, but the effective difference seems to be less at least
here.
- There may be vagaries on floor / wall losses
- there should be different radio efficiencies at the 2 frequencies
since I havent seen any device which doesnt share antennas, so maybe
it depends on which gets tuned best in the design.....

I expect interference in 2.4 GHz with other WiFi and all the non
802.11 stuff in that band will be a lot worse, but I dont have the
test gear to quantify that
- and as long as it works reasonably well I dont think I care.

What did make a big difference to stability, reliability and
performance was replacing the consumer WiFi routers acting as APs.....
- which also didnt give coverage in the garden.

For some reason if my phone was connected to the 5 GHz network rather than
the 2.4 GHz one, I got pauses and dropouts when streaming audio (eg using
the BBC Radio app) to my Bluetooth headphones. If I used 2.4 GHz, or if I
used 5 GHz and connected the headphones directly by plugging them into the
phone, the dropouts disappeared. Some sort of interaction between 5 GHz and
Bluetooth?


--
Stephen
  #15  
Old August 18th 18, 04:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 689
Default Sky routers

Stephen wrote:

[snip]


I expect interference in 2.4 GHz with other WiFi and all the non
802.11 stuff in that band will be a lot worse, but I dont have the
test gear to quantify that
- and as long as it works reasonably well I don't think I care.



It all depends what you do with your network. If you're file sharing
from a server to several workstations & laptops, the difference between
Wifi and wired Ethernet will be very significant. So for an office
where the users have laptops this could be very important.

The Wifi might achieve up to 50Mbits/sec half duplex to one device per
access point. Realistically only a tenth of that, though.

Wired Ethernet can achieve a Gigabit full duplex from every port on a
full-spec network switch, simultaneously, guaranteed. Of course the
client device must support Gigabit, but anything modern will do so.

PC laptop users in particular might well use "Offline Files" which will
synchronise with the server when connected to the LAN. A wired
connection makes this feasible for business-level volumes of data.

--
Graham J

  #16  
Old August 18th 18, 11:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Michael Chare[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default Sky routers

On 17/08/2018 15:39, DrTeeth wrote:
Hi,

My neighbour has a Sky service. For some reason it looks like he has
two routers/Wi-Fi access points judging by what I see when I use a
program to show the channels on 2.4/5 GHz. Why is this? I do not have
any problems with it, just curious.


A program such as Acrylic will show the MAC addresses of the access
points. If there is more than one box the MAC addresses will be more
different than if both signals come from the same box.
  #17  
Old August 19th 18, 10:33 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DrTeeth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default Sky routers

On Fri, 17 Aug 2018 18:27:46 +0100, just as I was about to take a
herb, Graham. disturbed my reverie and wrote:

The other thing that happens with BT customers, is a second unsecured
SSID for public use by BT customers who are likewise altruistic at
home.


Hi Graham,

Apologies to you and all who replied tot his thread, I should have
made it clear that he uses two 2.4 channels. He is not on 5GHz.

I would have assumed one router if I saw both 2.4 and 5 signals. Sorry
for the assumption.
--
Cheers,

DrT

"If you want to find out what is wrong
with democracy, spend five minutes with
the average voter". - Winston Churchill
  #18  
Old August 19th 18, 10:35 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DrTeeth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default Sky routers

On 18 Aug 2018 11:45:39 +0100 (BST), just as I was about to take a
herb, Theo disturbed my reverie
and wrote:

It's also possible the Sky router's wifi isn't very good, and he's bought a
second router/access point to increase the wifi strength. He may not have
dug into the Sky settings to turn off the first's wifi.


They both have unmodified Sky SSIDs.
--
Cheers,

DrT

"If you want to find out what is wrong
with democracy, spend five minutes with
the average voter". - Winston Churchill
  #19  
Old August 19th 18, 10:41 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DrTeeth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default Sky routers

On Sat, 18 Aug 2018 23:53:23 +0100, just as I was about to take a
herb, Michael Chare disturbed my
reverie and wrote:

A program such as Acrylic will show the MAC addresses of the access
points. If there is more than one box the MAC addresses will be more
different than if both signals come from the same box.


Different MAC addys. I should have been clearer in that both signals
are on 2.4.

It looks like his routers are set to automatic as I can get them to
change channel by retuning my signal.

I just wondered if the two-router setup was a Sky feature. They moved
in a few months ago and got Sky soon after so I know the two Sky SSIDs
are his.
--
Cheers,

DrT

"If you want to find out what is wrong
with democracy, spend five minutes with
the average voter". - Winston Churchill
 




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