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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, not cabinet)



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 19th 18, 08:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
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Posts: 379
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, not cabinet)

If the BT Openreach fibre site
https://www.homeandbusiness.openreac...an-i-get-fibre
for a given address reports a status of "Your area is currently in our plans
to be upgraded with Fibre to the Premises (FTTP)", does that mean that
*only* FTTP (to the premises) will be available, or will FTTC/VDSL also be
available at a cheaper price?

  #2  
Old August 19th 18, 09:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 224
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

On 19/08/2018 20:55, NY wrote:
If the BT Openreach fibre site
https://www.homeandbusiness.openreac...an-i-get-fibre
for a given address reports a status of "Your area is currently in our
plans to be upgraded with Fibre to the Premises (FTTP)", does that mean
that *only* FTTP (to the premises) will be available, or will FTTC/VDSL
also be available at a cheaper price?


We were "exploring solutions" for 3 years in the trot (and I think more
years before that, but we didn't live here).

It jumped straight to taking orders. When they realised we were about to
do something that wouldn't involve BT.

I wouldn't hold your breath.

Andy
  #3  
Old August 20th 18, 09:33 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
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Posts: 379
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, not cabinet)

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
news
On 19/08/2018 20:55, NY wrote:
If the BT Openreach fibre site
https://www.homeandbusiness.openreac...an-i-get-fibre
for a given address reports a status of "Your area is currently in our
plans to be upgraded with Fibre to the Premises (FTTP)", does that mean
that *only* FTTP (to the premises) will be available, or will FTTC/VDSL
also be available at a cheaper price?


We were "exploring solutions" for 3 years in the trot (and I think more
years before that, but we didn't live here).

It jumped straight to taking orders. When they realised we were about to
do something that wouldn't involve BT.

I wouldn't hold your breath.


I realise that "Exploring solutions" or "In our plans" is a long way from
being able to accept orders.

However I was asking more about the mention of FTTP as opposed to FTTC.
If/when the area does get fibre, does the mention of FTTP mean that they
will *only* offer FTTP (at a very high price for a very fast service) or are
BT likely to offer FTTC with VDSL for the final few hundred metres, as a
cheaper and slower service (but still considerably faster than ADSL)?

Should I be worried by that mention of FTTP? Will it mean a choice between a
fast, expensive service (FTTP) or a considerably slower and cheaper service
(ADSL), with no halfway house of FTTC? Or am I reading more into BT ORs
statement than was intended?

  #4  
Old August 20th 18, 09:37 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Burns[_5_]
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Posts: 271
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

NY wrote:

Will it mean a choice between a fast, expensive service (FTTP) or a
considerably slower and cheaper service (ADSL)


Where FTTP is available instead of FTTC, you can purchase a VDSL speed
connection at a VDSL price.

  #5  
Old August 20th 18, 01:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roger Mills
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Posts: 283
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

On 20/08/2018 09:37, Andy Burns wrote:
NY wrote:

Will it mean a choice between a fast, expensive service (FTTP) or a
considerably slower and cheaper service (ADSL)


Where FTTP is available instead of FTTC, you can purchase a VDSL speed
connection at a VDSL price.


How is that physically implemented? Do you actually have FTTP with the
speed artificially restricted, or do you still have copper as far as the
cabinet?
--
Cheers,
Roger
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  #6  
Old August 20th 18, 01:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Burns[_5_]
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Posts: 271
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

Roger Mills wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

Where FTTP is available instead of FTTC, you can purchase a VDSL speed
connection at a VDSL price.


How is that physically implemented?


They just cap the speed on the fibre
  #7  
Old August 20th 18, 04:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, not cabinet)

"Andy Burns" wrote in message
...
Roger Mills wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

Where FTTP is available instead of FTTC, you can purchase a VDSL speed
connection at a VDSL price.


How is that physically implemented?


They just cap the speed on the fibre


Ah so you need a special FTTP modem and then arrange an Ethernet link to
where you want your router. The two are often not in the same place: BT tend
to want to put a VDSL or FTTP modem as close to the master socket as
possible, whereas a router tends to be best in an upstairs room for widest
wifi coverage, and maybe in the room where the main computer is, so it can
be connected by Ethernet rather than wifi or Homeplug.

Phone extension cable is easier to route from one room to another, alongside
carpets and under metal carpet-joining strips through doorway; Cat 5 is
thicker and more difficult to route it without being noticeable.

FTTP is something to die for, but sometimes you don't want to pay the earth
for it. Mind you, 100+ Mbps up and down would be very tempting...

  #8  
Old August 20th 18, 04:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andy Burns[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 271
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

NY wrote:

Ah so you need a special FTTP modem


ONT they call it

and then arrange an Ethernet link to
where you want your router. The two are often not in the same place:


https://youtu.be/1-6LKAPlEyk

FTTP is something to die for, but sometimes you don't want to pay the
earth for it. Mind you, 100+ Mbps up and down would be very tempting...


Presume you can buy in at 40/10, 80/20, 160/30 or 330/50Mbps

  #9  
Old August 20th 18, 04:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dick
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Posts: 104
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

On 20/08/2018 16:16, Andy Burns wrote:
NY wrote:

Ah so you need a special FTTP modem


ONT they call it

and then arrange an Ethernet link to where you want your router. The
two are often not in the same place:


https://youtu.be/1-6LKAPlEyk

FTTP is something to die for, but sometimes you don't want to pay the
earth for it. Mind you, 100+ Mbps up and down would be very tempting...


Presume you can buy in at 40/10, 80/20, 160/30 or 330/50Mbps

55/10, 80/20, 220/30, 330/30, 1000/220
  #10  
Old August 20th 18, 04:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
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Posts: 74
Default BT Openreach predicting "In Scope" for FTTP (premises, notcabinet)

On 20/08/18 16:00, NY wrote:

Phone extension cable is easier to route from one room to another,
alongside carpets and under metal carpet-joining strips through doorway;
Cat 5 is thicker and more difficult to route it without being noticeable.

FTTP is something to die for, but sometimes you don't want to pay the
earth for it. Mind you, 100+ Mbps up and down would be very tempting...


A friend of mine in San Francisco gets that, plus a phone line, for less
a month than I pay for FTTC and a 40/10 connection. Typical, isn't it...

I agree Ethernet can be a pain to route and install, but it's so worth
it once it's done. It took us over a year to fully install structured
cabling (money issues rather than time and effort) but it is so useful
now it's done.

--
Ria in Aberdeen

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