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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

High speed broadband to become a legal right



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 6th 18, 08:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On 06/10/2018 20:08, Richmond wrote:
In Cleveland (USA) they used millimetre wave wireless. I am not sure how
that works, maybe using dishes, but I think it is not so good in fog and
rain. If you have no broadband at all I guess even broadband on sunny
days only would be a boon.

https://www.digitalc.org/connect-the...ected-program/


Yes, similar solutions are used in Scotland, sometimes completely
community funded, sometimes with startup regional development funding
from bodies such as Highland & Island Enterprise (HIE) ...

http://heriotbroadband.co.uk/

.... while in Lancashire in northern England there is an entirely
community funded scheme which brings FTTP to any and every home in the
region that wants it ...

https://b4rn.org.uk/

I previously tried to persuade HIE to extend the rollout of FTTC at the
Lairg exchange to cover Shinness, where I and 60 other households live,
but without success ...

http://www.macfh.co.uk/Shinness/FTTC...ubmission.html

However, there is new funding, and I'm trying again. We've at least got
the promise of the first of our cabinets this time, I'm going to try and
investigate the possibilities of doing some of the donkey work ourselves
and to find other funding to bring FTTC or oven FTTP to every house in
our neighbourhood.
  #12  
Old October 7th 18, 11:27 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DrTeeth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 332
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

I have read this thread with interest.

How practical would it be to allow end-users to request a cabinet
change or similar?

The reason I ask is that I am connected to my second closest FTTC
cabinet and would love to be connected to the closest. My connection
is not that bad, but it did have a 20% or thereabouts permanent speed
drop a while ago. I have a download speed meter running continuously.
--
Cheers,

DrT

"If you want to find out what is wrong
with democracy, spend five minutes with
the average voter". - Winston Churchill
  #13  
Old October 7th 18, 01:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Eager[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 11:27:13 +0100, DrTeeth wrote:

I have read this thread with interest.

How practical would it be to allow end-users to request a cabinet change
or similar?

The reason I ask is that I am connected to my second closest FTTC
cabinet and would love to be connected to the closest. My connection is
not that bad, but it did have a 20% or thereabouts permanent speed drop
a while ago. I have a download speed meter running continuously.


I got nearly all the way with just this. The alternate cabinet would have
required the line to come from a pole at the back of the house,
overflying someone's garden. I wrote to the developer (it had been bought
for refurb) and got no reply. I eventually contacted him at home and he
was more than helpful, giving me a letter to use.

By that time BT seemed to have changed their minds, and they flat out
refused.
  #14  
Old October 7th 18, 06:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 526
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On Friday, 5 October 2018 13:10:54 UTC+1, 7 wrote:
Java Jive wrote:

Not sure if I've linked to this before, so ...

"High speed broadband to become a legal right.

Universal Service Obligation will deliver high speed broadband across
the UK - Published 20 December 2017

From: Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport and The Rt Hon
Karen Bradley MP

The Government has confirmed that universal high speed broadband will be
delivered by a regulatory Universal Service Obligation (USO), giving
everyone in the UK access to speeds of at least 10 Mbps by 2020.

...

In the summer, we received a proposal from BT to deliver universal
broadband through a voluntary agreement. We welcomed BT's proposal and
have considered this in detail alongside a regulatory approach. We did
not feel the proposal was strong enough for us to take the regulatory
USO off the table, and have therefore decided not to pursue BT's
proposal in favour of providing a legal right to broadband."

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/h...-a-legal-right



This allows copper providers to be told
to supply more copper.

Phone Internet and cable Internet cumpanies
to benefit. Fiber Internet companies
are not given a look in despite
fiber Internet is 20x cheaper per bit
than any phone Internet or cable Internet.


Indeed it is, but who wants 20 times more bits than they need?


The regulatory system stacked with crooks
working for phone Internet and cable Internet
cumpanies. A true USO also includes fiber - THANKS!


And Hyperoptic? Could it be over trading? Have the directors properly considered whether the company can meet all its commitments?
  #15  
Old October 7th 18, 10:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 204
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On 05/10/2018 14:20, Rodney Pont wrote:
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 10:20:22 +0100, NY wrote:

I wonder what they will do about people who are at the end of long phone
lines in rural areas several miles from an exchange. Will they have a
get-out clause like "we don't have to upgrade the phone line if there's 10
Mbps by some other means such as mobile or Virgin, even if it's more
expensive"?


When this was first in the news it was that everyone will have the
right to 'ask' for high speed. It didn't guarantee that they would get
it.

Now it's subject to a cost ceiling (as stated in the article) but I
don't know what that is. It's a USO for those where the supplier can
afford it!


Will people be able to go to any telecom company and demand high speed
broadband or will it be just BT who have to serve the unprofitable
users, as usual.


  #16  
Old October 7th 18, 11:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rodney Pont[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 22:17:57 +0100, MB wrote:

Will people be able to go to any telecom company and demand high speed
broadband or will it be just BT who have to serve the unprofitable
users, as usual.


I presume, as now, you will be able to go to any telecom company and
demand high speed broadband and they will get Openreach to install it,
unless they already have their equipment in the exchange. Since the
cost cap will apply you may well not get it anyway.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #17  
Old October 8th 18, 09:09 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

"Rodney Pont" wrote in message
hit.me.uk...
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 22:17:57 +0100, MB wrote:

Will people be able to go to any telecom company and demand high speed
broadband or will it be just BT who have to serve the unprofitable
users, as usual.


I presume, as now, you will be able to go to any telecom company and
demand high speed broadband and they will get Openreach to install it,
unless they already have their equipment in the exchange. Since the
cost cap will apply you may well not get it anyway.


Which means that the people who need it most (those that BT don't already
serve with a high-speed line) are the ones who won't be able to benefit from
the right.

And will the existence of a more expensive alternative (eg Virgin versus BT
OR) preclude you from asking BT OR (via your ISP) for a fast FTTC/VDSL
connection. Virgin is fine, but the cost is higher (though you may get a
higher speed), and you don't get the same benefit of bundled phone/internet
packages that your ISP may provide, and Virgin's call charges are higher
IIRC.

  #18  
Old October 8th 18, 09:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rodney Pont[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

On Mon, 8 Oct 2018 09:09:38 +0100, NY wrote:

Will people be able to go to any telecom company and demand high speed
broadband or will it be just BT who have to serve the unprofitable
users, as usual.


I presume, as now, you will be able to go to any telecom company and
demand high speed broadband and they will get Openreach to install it,
unless they already have their equipment in the exchange. Since the
cost cap will apply you may well not get it anyway.


Which means that the people who need it most (those that BT don't already
serve with a high-speed line) are the ones who won't be able to benefit from
the right.


That's right. It doesn't mean that a hill farmer in Wales is entitled
to have a fibre cable installed even though he is too far away to get
any form of land based broadband.

And will the existence of a more expensive alternative (eg Virgin versus BT
OR) preclude you from asking BT OR (via your ISP) for a fast FTTC/VDSL
connection. Virgin is fine, but the cost is higher (though you may get a
higher speed), and you don't get the same benefit of bundled phone/internet
packages that your ISP may provide, and Virgin's call charges are higher
IIRC.


Cost to the user doesn't come into the equation as far as I'm aware. If
you have one fast alternative you can't force another company to
install one just for you.

I really can't see the point of the cost of the legal stuff since it's
unlikely to make any difference.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #19  
Old October 8th 18, 10:02 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

"Rodney Pont" wrote in message
hit.me.uk...
Cost to the user doesn't come into the equation as far as I'm aware. If
you have one fast alternative you can't force another company to
install one just for you.

I really can't see the point of the cost of the legal stuff since it's
unlikely to make any difference.


Nor me. It sounds like something that pays lip service to the problem of
people who can't get affordable fast broadband, but when you look at the
details there are so many exclusions (remote hill farmer, availability of
alternative more expensive service) that it's not worth doing.

It needs a universal compulsion on BT or other telephone infrastructure
company to provide broadband at a reasonable rate. The present two-tier rate
for ADSL that most ISPs charge seems fair. Making people pay many times more
for satellite internet, community wireless or cable is not really
acceptable.

We are house-hunting and one of the things we look at is availability of
fast (eg 30 D / 10 U Mbps) broadband at FTTC not Virgin rates. I can see
more and more people doing that, leading to remote houses or those on a
housing estate that BT OR has not intention of ever upgrading ("we are
investigating ways of providing fat broadband - you may want to consider a
community scheme") being valued at a lower price and being harder to sell.

  #20  
Old October 8th 18, 10:08 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tweed[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default High speed broadband to become a legal right

Rodney Pont wrote:
On Mon, 8 Oct 2018 09:09:38 +0100, NY wrote:

Will people be able to go to any telecom company and demand high speed
broadband or will it be just BT who have to serve the unprofitable
users, as usual.

I presume, as now, you will be able to go to any telecom company and
demand high speed broadband and they will get Openreach to install it,
unless they already have their equipment in the exchange. Since the
cost cap will apply you may well not get it anyway.


Which means that the people who need it most (those that BT don't already
serve with a high-speed line) are the ones who won't be able to benefit from
the right.


That's right. It doesn't mean that a hill farmer in Wales is entitled
to have a fibre cable installed even though he is too far away to get
any form of land based broadband.

And will the existence of a more expensive alternative (eg Virgin versus BT
OR) preclude you from asking BT OR (via your ISP) for a fast FTTC/VDSL
connection. Virgin is fine, but the cost is higher (though you may get a
higher speed), and you don't get the same benefit of bundled phone/internet
packages that your ISP may provide, and Virgin's call charges are higher
IIRC.


Cost to the user doesn't come into the equation as far as I'm aware. If
you have one fast alternative you can't force another company to
install one just for you.

I really can't see the point of the cost of the legal stuff since it's
unlikely to make any difference.


I don't quite follow the difficulty for the rural hill farmer types. For
most of these locations their electricity supply comes in via overhead
wires on wooden poles. Why can't a fibre be added? It's not even as if it
is a conductor. The concentration seems to be on forcing BT to give up
access to its ducts and poles, maybe it's the local electricity
distribution networks we should be looking at. And before anyone says
you,can't possibly mix electricity and telecoms, they do it all over rural
France. We seem to have managed to have cracked the problem of rural
electrification when the country was much poorer, and there was little of
this attitude of “you live in the countryside what do you expect, why
should city dwellers subsidise you (contd page 94)”.

 




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