A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

SOT -



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #211  
Old December 2nd 18, 11:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Jerry Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

On Sun, 2 Dec 2018 09:45:09 +0000, Bob Henson
wrote:

Graham. wrote:

NY wrote:

"Bob Henson" wrote in message
...
They should be by now. Electronic transmission of prescriptions was due to
come in a couple of years before I retired from pharmacy. I retired seven
years ago, and it still is not fully implemented. However, in the more
enlightened areas most are now sent that way. There is even a move afoot
to
send some controlled drug prescriptions that way, when they can make it
secure enough.

One doctor's practice that I used had electronic transmission of
prescriptions to the in-house pharmacy. When we moved house and hence
doctor's practice I was surprised to be given a paper prescription to be
handed to the in-house pharmacy. I'd assumed that prescriptions had been
abolished, at least when the pharmacy was part of the surgery building, as
opposed to any old high street surgery.

I was always surprised at how trusting pharmacies were of private
prescriptions, which are typically written on a consultant's compliment slip
and signed with a vague squiggle.


The level of trust varies with the prescription to some extent. A
prescription for anything which is subject to abuse would certainly be
checked carefully. We would ring the practice to check the prescription was
valid - NEVER using the number printed on the prescription, which could be
a public phone box if an abuser was smart enough - and some of them are.
You quickly learn to identify local prescribers handwriting and what passes
for a signature. Any prescriptions from out of area would be checked more
thoroughly.


Controlled drugs are an interesting one. My mum used to work as a pharmacy
technician at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. When the new spinal unit was being
set up, there was one weekend when the outpost pharmacy was being stocked
with drugs from the main one. My dad, who has a pharmacy degree, although
he's worked in research rather than dispensing for almost all his working
life, was called in to meet the legal requirements that all controlled drugs
must be accompanied by a qualified pharmacist while being transported around
the hospital. I'd have though that a brick-****house bouncer would have been
a better person to use than a man who could have been mugged by a desperate
patient.

Random times and people that don't attract attention are possibly the best
way - but there is no totally foolproof way.


"Dr Foster has mislaid an FP10 pad nos. xxxxx - xxxxx and will be
signing in green ink until further notice."


I wouldn't mind a quid for every time I've had a letter like that from the
Family Practitioner Committee (as it was in those days - there has been a
lot of nym shifting in the Medical Civil Service since then).


That's the second time I've noticed that green ink apparently has
special properties. When I'd been working for NatWest Bank a couple of
years I was "reminded"[1] that using green ink was gross misconduct,
as only auditors were allowed to use it.

[1] This was the first time it was mentioned.

--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
  #212  
Old December 2nd 18, 11:41 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Eager[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

On Sun, 02 Dec 2018 10:25:05 +0000, Jerry Brown wrote:

That's the second time I've noticed that green ink apparently has
special properties. When I'd been working for NatWest Bank a couple of
years I was "reminded"[1] that using green ink was gross misconduct, as
only auditors were allowed to use it.

[1] This was the first time it was mentioned.


When I was teaching full time, green ink also had a special meaning. Exam
scripts were marked using red ink, then second marked using green ink. [1]

[1] If a student used either of those colours, then another was
substitued for that script alone, with a prominent annotation to that
effect on the front page. This was needed *very* rarely.
  #213  
Old December 2nd 18, 12:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Recliner[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

Graham. wrote:
MissRiaElaine wrote:
On 29/11/2018 15:50, Recliner wrote:

Previously Boots re-ordered repeat prescriptions automatically, but the
local NHS rules have changed, and now that's no longer allowed. The reason
is to avoid dispensing repeated medicines that patients are no longer
taking.
That's interesting, is that in England..?


Yes, but it's a local policy in northwest London. The rules may well be
different elsewhere in England.

Here in Scotland we have the
Chronic Medication Service which does exactly that, all your regular
stuff is on there, it's ordered automatically every 8 weeks and when you
collect the pharmacist asks if there's anything you don't need and you
can hand it back. That way it can be issued to someone else, as once
you've collected something and taken it away, they cannot re-issue it,
even if it's unopened.


That's roughly what we used to have, but they decided that too much was
still being wasted. Every few months one of the pharmacists would ask if
you had time for a short meeting, and she'd check that you knew what each
of the medicines was for, that you were taking it regularly as prescribed,
and that you weren't getting side effects. I think the GP signalled when
this was needed.



MUR Medicine Use Review.
As you probebly have guessed, the CCG pay the pharmacy for each one
they do, so the pressure to do them comes from the pharmacy chain
management.


Oh yes, I guessed that they were paid for doing the review, and probably
had targets. The same is presumably true of flu jabs, which they seem keen
to do?

  #214  
Old December 2nd 18, 03:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

On Sun, 2 Dec 2018 09:45:09 +0000, Bob Henson
wrote:

Graham. wrote:

NY wrote:

"Bob Henson" wrote in message
...
They should be by now. Electronic transmission of prescriptions was due to
come in a couple of years before I retired from pharmacy. I retired seven
years ago, and it still is not fully implemented. However, in the more
enlightened areas most are now sent that way. There is even a move afoot
to
send some controlled drug prescriptions that way, when they can make it
secure enough.

One doctor's practice that I used had electronic transmission of
prescriptions to the in-house pharmacy. When we moved house and hence
doctor's practice I was surprised to be given a paper prescription to be
handed to the in-house pharmacy. I'd assumed that prescriptions had been
abolished, at least when the pharmacy was part of the surgery building, as
opposed to any old high street surgery.

I was always surprised at how trusting pharmacies were of private
prescriptions, which are typically written on a consultant's compliment slip
and signed with a vague squiggle.


The level of trust varies with the prescription to some extent. A
prescription for anything which is subject to abuse would certainly be
checked carefully. We would ring the practice to check the prescription was
valid - NEVER using the number printed on the prescription, which could be
a public phone box if an abuser was smart enough - and some of them are.
You quickly learn to identify local prescribers handwriting and what passes
for a signature. Any prescriptions from out of area would be checked more
thoroughly.


Controlled drugs are an interesting one. My mum used to work as a pharmacy
technician at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. When the new spinal unit was being
set up, there was one weekend when the outpost pharmacy was being stocked
with drugs from the main one. My dad, who has a pharmacy degree, although
he's worked in research rather than dispensing for almost all his working
life, was called in to meet the legal requirements that all controlled drugs
must be accompanied by a qualified pharmacist while being transported around
the hospital. I'd have though that a brick-****house bouncer would have been
a better person to use than a man who could have been mugged by a desperate
patient.

Random times and people that don't attract attention are possibly the best
way - but there is no totally foolproof way.

"Dr Foster has mislaid an FP10 pad nos. xxxxx - xxxxx and will be
signing in green ink until further notice."


I wouldn't mind a quid for every time I've had a letter like that from the
Family Practitioner Committee (as it was in those days - there has been a
lot of nym shifting in the Medical Civil Service since then).


That's the second time I've noticed that green ink apparently has
special properties. When I'd been working for NatWest Bank a couple of
years I was "reminded"[1] that using green ink was gross misconduct,
as only auditors were allowed to use it.

[1] This was the first time it was mentioned.



I bet it's the third not the second time you've encountered it.
Remember "2/10 See Me" scrawled in red biro in your school exercise
books? Maybe in your case it was "Excellent work, 3hp"

I don't think there was any particular significance to green, just not
the usual choice of colour.



--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #215  
Old December 2nd 18, 04:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam


I was wondering if we ever met Bob, where was your shop?

I did installations for John Richardson's / Cegedim Rx between 1990
and 2015, (with two or three hiatuses).

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #216  
Old December 2nd 18, 05:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Henson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

Graham. wrote:

I was wondering if we ever met Bob, where was your shop?

I did installations for John Richardson's / Cegedim Rx between 1990
and 2015, (with two or three hiatuses).


Normal Bell Chemists, Church Street, Tetbury from 1984 to 1998 and then
within the Docs Surgery on Long Street to 2007. Then we sold out to Assura
for whom I worked for a couple of years, then retired in 2010. I started
off with a system from a Liverpool firm (Parkers?) running on Amstrads,
then I wrote my own software in QuickBasic and then switched to using Mike
Hadley's (Hadley Hutt) system when it all got too involved for me to keep
up with software developments. I think we used Cegedim with Assura.

--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Nobody teaches volcanoes to erupt, tsunamis to devastate, hurricanes to
swirl around, or a man how to choose a wife. Natural disasters just happen.
  #217  
Old December 2nd 18, 06:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 433
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

"Jerry Brown" wrote in message
.uk...
That's the second time I've noticed that green ink apparently has
special properties. When I'd been working for NatWest Bank a couple of
years I was "reminded"[1] that using green ink was gross misconduct,
as only auditors were allowed to use it.


I remember that the teachers at my school had special biros with a sort of
blue/purple in, unlike the colour found in any other biro. I presume they
were a special colour to make sure the teacher's comments stood out from any
other colour that the pupil might have used in their homework.



Going back to medication. How about this for an alternative use? My dad used
to work for Leo Laboratories and his first role with them was as a sales
rep, trying to interest hospitals in Leo's Fucidin Tulle - 6" squares of
gauze impregnated with Fucidin [antibiotic] ointment to be spread on a large
wound. It came in a flat 6" square box. For many years, my mum carried
around a box of it in her car (not sure whether it still had the contents
inside) because the sharp edge of the box made a brilliant ice-scraper to
clear her car window!

Dad then moved on to designing/analysing clinical trials for Burinex and
1-Alpha (Bob, you have probably dispensed loads of those tablets!), visiting
hospital consultants to discuss clinical trial results and side effects. He
reckons that it was while he was taking me up to London in about 1980 that I
first interested him in computer programming while we were on the train,
which made him realise how he could write software for storing and analysing
results. I remember after that going to his office many times after hours to
help him with his programmes until the caretaker eventually threw us out :-)
That was in the days of 8" floppy disks as the only storage, slow and noisy
daisy-wheel printers and having to post a floppy to an external company to
have things laser-printed or to have 35 mm slides made from vector files
(Word Perfect Graphics, IIRC) that his software generated.

  #218  
Old December 2nd 18, 10:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 289
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

Graham. wrote:

I was wondering if we ever met Bob, where was your shop?

I did installations for John Richardson's / Cegedim Rx between 1990
and 2015, (with two or three hiatuses).


Normal Bell Chemists, Church Street, Tetbury from 1984 to 1998 and then
within the Docs Surgery on Long Street to 2007. Then we sold out to Assura
for whom I worked for a couple of years, then retired in 2010. I started
off with a system from a Liverpool firm (Parkers?) running on Amstrads,
then I wrote my own software in QuickBasic and then switched to using Mike
Hadley's (Hadley Hutt) system when it all got too involved for me to keep
up with software developments. I think we used Cegedim with Assura.



I don't think I ever went to Tetbury, but one of the outfits I worked
for who did the installations and hardware support for Richardson /
NDC, had its HO in Gloucester.



--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #219  
Old December 3rd 18, 12:54 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 136
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

On 02/12/2018 10:25, Jerry Brown wrote:

That's the second time I've noticed that green ink apparently has
special properties. When I'd been working for NatWest Bank a couple of
years I was "reminded"[1] that using green ink was gross misconduct,
as only auditors were allowed to use it.


That's the same as when I worked for British Rail; only the auditors
used green ink there as well.


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #220  
Old December 3rd 18, 12:56 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 136
Default SOT - RBS customer lost thousands of pounds in scam

On 01/12/2018 23:37, Graham. wrote:
On 25/11/2018 22:58, MB wrote:
On 24/11/2018 09:19, Graham J wrote:

The NHS is probably a good example of an organisation where it is
often necesary to send a diagram or other freehand drawing rather than
simply text.* A computer system that supports this in the widest
possible sense would need a good and easy-to-use graphical program.
From what I've seen such programs are not easy to use - typically they
are CAD systems - which are nothing like word processors in that for
even the simplest sketch some level of training is required.* By
contrast most users of word processors have (self-evidently) never had
any training in their use.

Rather like I believe they still use Lamson tubes and I suspect will
continue to do so for many years.


A lot of people still use those. Still one of the best (if not the best)
way of moving bits of paper or small items from A to B within a building.


Not seen those used in the NHS, unless you want to include a pharmacy
within a supermarket.


Specsavers use them IIRC. Got an eye test this week, I'll double check.


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SOT: problems with Skype Woody uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 6 March 12th 18 01:05 PM
SOT wireless dropout Woody uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 5 February 28th 10 02:03 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2018 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.