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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 28th 18, 06:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
123456789
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Posts: 4
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

On 11/28/2018 9:21 AM, NY wrote:

Depends whether there are other routers that use the same channel within
interference range. That would slow things down down a lot if there are
collisions.


My neighbor's WiFi was (of course) on the same 2.4 GHz channel as mine
so I moved my WiFi to the other end of the band. I didn't have any
noticeable problems before the move but thought it would be a good idea.
I still don't have any noticeable problems...
  #12  
Old November 28th 18, 07:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
NY
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Posts: 433
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

"nospam" wrote in message
...
use the same ssid for both and it will intelligently switch.


I did do this to see if it made any difference. Both with same and different
"wibble_2.4" and "wibble_5", the iPad always seemed to prefer weak 5 GHz
over strong 2.4. Our various Android phones seemed to be more sensible and
looked at signal strength as well.

some wifi routers can adjust the threshold at which it switches.


Surely it's the client device not the router which chooses.

ideally, set up one or more 5ghz wifi access points elsewhere in the
house, wherever it's needed. mesh units make this *very* easy but
non-mesh units will also work.


And find a way to get the network signal from the router to the repeater
access points. Probably not by wifi, because that will result in a reduction
of data rate when a device is using a repeater. So you are left with
Homeplug (annoys radio hams) or laying Ethernet cable (have to clear it with
SWMBO).

When wifi repeaters are used, is it better to have the repeater on a
different SSID and channel to the main router wifi, or on the same values? I
never know. Instinct would suggest that different channel at least (and
maybe different SSID) would avoid interference between main and repeater.

  #13  
Old November 28th 18, 07:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
Alfred[_2_]
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

Most ISP provided modems are capable of 5GHz operation and 802.11n these
days - maybe you should ask your ISP to replace your antidiluvian unit.


The 5 GHz band is too problematic. Only channels 36, 40, 44, 48 are
reliable (in Europe). The rest of the channels between 52-144 are
subject to DFS. In America you also have a few channels above 149.

In the case of some devices the manufacturer only implements 36-48
channels because it's the simplest way of complying with EU/US/Japan
regulations.

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.
  #14  
Old November 28th 18, 07:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
nospam
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Posts: 82
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , NY
wrote:

use the same ssid for both and it will intelligently switch.


I did do this to see if it made any difference. Both with same and different
"wibble_2.4" and "wibble_5", the iPad always seemed to prefer weak 5 GHz
over strong 2.4. Our various Android phones seemed to be more sensible and
looked at signal strength as well.


generally, 5 ghz is preferred, even if the signal is weaker. what
matters is throughput.

some wifi routers can adjust the threshold at which it switches.


Surely it's the client device not the router which chooses.


it's a mix of both, however, some routers have custom settings:
https://i.imgur.com/sDMmciZ.jpg

ideally, set up one or more 5ghz wifi access points elsewhere in the
house, wherever it's needed. mesh units make this *very* easy but
non-mesh units will also work.


And find a way to get the network signal from the router to the repeater
access points. Probably not by wifi, because that will result in a reduction
of data rate when a device is using a repeater. So you are left with
Homeplug (annoys radio hams) or laying Ethernet cable (have to clear it with
SWMBO).


mesh is not the same as a repeater.

with mesh, there is little to no reduction in throughput because there
is an additional wireless backchannel. put them wherever needed. no
need to run additional cables.
  #15  
Old November 28th 18, 07:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
nospam
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Posts: 82
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.
  #16  
Old November 28th 18, 08:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 550
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

On Wednesday, 28 November 2018 13:04:07 UTC, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 28/11/2018 12.57, Martin Brown wrote:
On 26/11/2018 17:01, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Java Jive
writes:
Note the slovenly misdescription in the title and throughout the
article, for 'WiFi' read 'landline'.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46346172

"Speed tests in 80 countries revealed wi-fi was left lagging in 33
nations, according to wireless coverage mapping company OpenSignal.

Mobile data should also get a further speed boost when 5G networks
arrived, it said.

Wi-fi remained the fastest way to go online in most countries
surveyed, including the UK and Ireland."

I agree it's _slightly_ sloppy usage, but the first line of text in
the article is the caption to the header picture, which specifically
says "wi-fi via a fixed line".

The whole thing seems to be a relay of a report (press release?) from
"wireless coverage mapping company OpenSignal.". I sense it's not
entirely objective - for example, OpenSignal said phone-makers
needed to "ensure they do not accidentally push consumers' smartphones
on to a wi-fi network with a worse experience than the mobile
network". That doesn't take account of the fact that most wi-fi
networks are unlimited usage, whereas most mobile data is paid (either
by amount of data, or at least has a daily/monthly/whatever cap), so
using wifi where available may be wise. (Besides, I think even my
Android 4.2.2 has "use wi-fi where available" as an _optional_
setting, i. e. can be turned off.)


The one that is critical is do not allow insane sized operating system
upgrades to download whilst on a paid for by volume of data connection.

My own 3G connection will run 20Mbps at home whereas my best fixed line
is 5M and for most rural domestic users round here 1-2M is more typical.
So apart from the data charges which sting a little 3G is way faster
(and 4G is a distant pipe dream - most masts here are still EDGE 2.5G).


Well, my WiFi does at most 45 Mbit (with a 600 Mbit land line). So 4G,
with a theoretical speed of 301Mbit, is faster than my WiFi - unless
there are many phones in the area actively using internet, because the
speed is shared.

Many people have such slow WiFi. And even slower if living on a flat
(apartment): 1 MB is typical.

Yes, it is possible to purchase access points using 5 Gh and improve speed.

--
Cheers, Carlos.


My Wi-Fi does 300Mbps on a 2G4Hz link for local transfers.

It is faster on a 5GHz connection, but I haven't measured that.

I get a bit over 50Mbps on FTTC (near theoretical max given line length) and 75Mbps on 4G
  #17  
Old November 28th 18, 08:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
Alfred[_2_]
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Posts: 18
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In uk.telecom.broadband nospam wrote:
In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.


You don't need planes to have problems. For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel. And there can also be false positives. The ISPs don't
want to receive complains to their customer service telling them that
the 5 GHz band doesnt' work and they just disable the 52-144 channels
altogether.

If you run an scan in your neighbourhood, you'll see that the 52-144
channels are empty. Which turns out to be a good thing for tech-savvy
people who know what is happening, even if the regulators didn't
intend that.
  #18  
Old November 28th 18, 09:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
nospam
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Posts: 82
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.


You don't need planes to have problems.


you mentioned planes.

For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel.


something is very, very wrong with your router.

most wifi routers boot in a minute or so, often less, and the only
reason to reboot it is for a firmware update or moving it to a new
location, so the boot time does not matter.

And there can also be false positives. The ISPs don't
want to receive complains to their customer service telling them that
the 5 GHz band doesnt' work and they just disable the 52-144 channels
altogether.


the isp can't disable anything on a wifi router that the isp did not
provide.

If you run an scan in your neighbourhood, you'll see that the 52-144
channels are empty. Which turns out to be a good thing for tech-savvy
people who know what is happening, even if the regulators didn't
intend that.


that depends on a lot of things. since most routers dynamically switch
channels, most channels, if not all of them, will be in use.
  #19  
Old November 28th 18, 11:32 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
nospam
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Posts: 82
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel.


something is very, very wrong with your router.

most wifi routers boot in a minute or so, often less, and the only
reason to reboot it is for a firmware update or moving it to a new
location, so the boot time does not matter.


That depends on which channel you use and the regulations in your
country. In some cases it can take up to 10 minutes (channels 120-128).
I was only off by a factor of 2 in the waiting time in my previous post.


nope.

booting should be in the range of a minute or so.

it might switch channels later, but that's separate.
  #20  
Old November 29th 18, 12:41 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
nospam
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Posts: 82
Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

That depends on which channel you use and the regulations in your
country. In some cases it can take up to 10 minutes (channels 120-128).


nope.

booting should be in the range of a minute or so.

it might switch channels later, but that's separate.


You reply too fast, without reading what people writes.


i read it.

Booting time for a modern router is very fast, just a couple of
seconds.


again, no. booting is about a minute, depending on the router.

The problem is the time it takes to begin transmitting
when you pick a certain fixed channel in the 5 GHz band.


don't pick a fixed channel.

If you choose channel 'auto', the router will most likely start
broadcasting immediately at the 36, 40, 44 or 48 channels, which are
not subjected to DFS.


in other words, not an issue. dfs channels may be delayed, but some
routers have zero-wait dfs.

Choosing a fixed channel is a sane thing to do in the 2.4 GHz band.
A lot of people run a frequency scan, and pick a frequency that is not
used by the neighbours, but in the 5 GHz band you need to be aware of
what happens in the DFS channels.


choosing a fixed channel is rarely the best thing to do, regardless of
band.

with the access point on automatic, it can dynamically switch channels
as needed, depending on changing conditions.

As I said before, this trap has caught professional network
administrators in the past, when 5 GHz wifi was a new thing. I am
sure many non-professionals are falling in it nowadays doing setup of
their home routers.


set the router to automatic and don't worry about it.
 



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