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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Half of UK homes could get faster broadband



 
 
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  #11  
Old January 2nd 19, 04:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Benham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 290
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 05:31:19 -0800, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

On Wednesday, 2 January 2019 12:55:44 UTC, Bob Eager wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.


I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?


Indeed - calling the number and letting it ring for a while would often improve low signal or noisy lines.


I used to have a resistor attached to a phone cord to pull a little
current all the time to "decrackle" the line. Obviously not enough
current to take the line off-hook.
Now I have a AAISP copper pair with no phone service on it, but the
resistor trick should still work.
  #12  
Old January 3rd 19, 01:05 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Gabriel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

In article ,
Bob Eager writes:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.


I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?


The nearest thing at hand was a tiny mains transformer, 6W, with
a split primary 0-120V 0-120V. I used one of the primary windings.
I tried one of the secondary windings first (0-6V) but it didn't
have enough inductance to generate a spark (which is barely
perceptable in any case).

Just to be clear, the transformer is not connected to anything
else. Also the back-EMF might be enough to give you a small
shock, so don't hold the two terminals.
This is all at your own risk, etc.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #13  
Old January 3rd 19, 01:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Gabriel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

In article ,
(Andrew Gabriel) writes:
In article ,
Bob Eager writes:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.


I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?


The nearest thing at hand was a tiny mains transformer, 6W, with
a split primary 0-120V 0-120V. I used one of the primary windings.
I tried one of the secondary windings first (0-6V) but it didn't
have enough inductance to generate a spark (which is barely
perceptable in any case).

Just to be clear, the transformer is not connected to anything
else. Also the back-EMF might be enough to give you a small
shock, so don't hold the two terminals.
This is all at your own risk, etc.


Oh, and disconnect all your own stuff from the line first.
BT's end is well protected against spikes bigger than this from
lightening, but your kit probably isn't.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #14  
Old January 3rd 19, 11:47 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 583
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Thursday, 3 January 2019 01:07:34 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
In article ,
(Andrew Gabriel) writes:
In article ,
Bob Eager writes:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.

I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?


The nearest thing at hand was a tiny mains transformer, 6W, with
a split primary 0-120V 0-120V. I used one of the primary windings.
I tried one of the secondary windings first (0-6V) but it didn't
have enough inductance to generate a spark (which is barely
perceptable in any case).

Just to be clear, the transformer is not connected to anything
else. Also the back-EMF might be enough to give you a small
shock, so don't hold the two terminals.
This is all at your own risk, etc.


Oh, and disconnect all your own stuff from the line first.
BT's end is well protected against spikes bigger than this from
lightening, but your kit probably isn't.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]


Neither - some years ago lightening struck a house about 200m away. It fried the exchange and both my lines went down. A couple of days later one was back up. I thought I had checked everything, swapped phones etc., but sadly the spike also did for one of my two line phones - embarrassing when I complained to BT...
 




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