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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Half of UK homes could get faster broadband



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 17th 18, 01:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 483
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

"One in seven homes could be paying more than they need to for broadband
and could get faster services for the same or less money, Ofcom has said.

New research suggests that half of UK homes have not taken up faster
services even though they are available.

Ofcom has launched a campaign dubbed Boost Your Broadband to let people
know about what options are available.

It follows years of effort to ensure that fast internet reaches as much
of the country as possible.

A website to accompany the campaign will allow people to check what
broadband they can receive in their area, as well as providing
independent information on how to get the best deal.

The regulator also announced proposals to force broadband and mobile
firms to tell customers about their best available deal, both when their
deals are coming to an end, and every year after that if they don't
change them.

It also plans to investigate broadband firms' pricing practices to
examine why some customers pay more than others.

It is particularly keen to look at introductory offers that run out. It
estimates that customers who take a landline and broadband service
together are paying an average of 19% more once their discounted deal
has expired.

It is currently reviewing how mobile operators charge their customers
for handsets when bundled with airtime in a single contract."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46552609
  #2  
Old December 17th 18, 06:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 613
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Monday, 17 December 2018 13:23:25 UTC, Java Jive wrote:
"One in seven homes could be paying more than they need to for broadband
and could get faster services for the same or less money, Ofcom has said.

New research suggests that half of UK homes have not taken up faster
services even though they are available.

Ofcom has launched a campaign dubbed Boost Your Broadband to let people
know about what options are available.

It follows years of effort to ensure that fast internet reaches as much
of the country as possible.

A website to accompany the campaign will allow people to check what
broadband they can receive in their area, as well as providing
independent information on how to get the best deal.

The regulator also announced proposals to force broadband and mobile
firms to tell customers about their best available deal, both when their
deals are coming to an end, and every year after that if they don't
change them.

It also plans to investigate broadband firms' pricing practices to
examine why some customers pay more than others.

It is particularly keen to look at introductory offers that run out. It
estimates that customers who take a landline and broadband service
together are paying an average of 19% more once their discounted deal
has expired.

It is currently reviewing how mobile operators charge their customers
for handsets when bundled with airtime in a single contract."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46552609


Indeed.

It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted Gigabit FTTP. In fact most of them are happy as long as they can stream full HD, which is nearly possible on direct connection and easy on FTTC.

It is also a fallacy that residential customers could even use Gigabit FTTP - what for? Big updates and cloud back up can happily trundle away in the background, some cloud apps even let you limit bandwidth intentionally.

Moreover if there is any sort of premium to go [much] faster at least half of them won't pay it.
  #3  
Old December 17th 18, 07:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 214
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On 17/12/2018 18:55, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted Gigabit FTTP. In fact most of them are happy as long as they can stream full HD, which is nearly possible on direct connection and easy on FTTC.

It is also a fallacy that residential customers could even use Gigabit FTTP - what for? Big updates and cloud back up can happily trundle away in the background, some cloud apps even let you limit bandwidth intentionally.

Moreover if there is any sort of premium to go [much] faster at least half of them won't pay it.


I'd have it if it were available. Trouble is, it isn't, and is unlikely
to be in this particular location in the foreseeable future.

What would I use it for..? No idea at the moment, but I'd find something..!


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #4  
Old December 18th 18, 08:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On 17/12/2018 18:55, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted Gigabit FTTP.


The big benefit with FTTP, (even if 90% of the punters don't consciously
realise it) is the stability of connection.

Just as FTTC is a half step to that over ADSL.


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #5  
Old December 18th 18, 10:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 193
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On 18/12/2018 08:07, Mark Carver wrote:
On 17/12/2018 18:55, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted
Gigabit FTTP.


The big benefit with FTTP, (even if 90% of the punters don't consciously
realise it) is the stability of connection.

Just as FTTC is a half step to that over ADSL.


Axtually on elderly copper lines it isn't.

Our neighbouring village has FTTC. I amd too far away and on basic ADSL
(but a particularly good circuit after much complaining). My connection
is stable. The people on faster FFTC are forever showing me their
connection stability problems and woes over the same set of cables.

I am too far from their cabinet to ever beenfit.

I can belive that FTTP or cable would be more stable since there would
be no archaic wire in the way. When I was on cable I can't recall ever
having a connectivity loss that wasn't caused by a mains power cut.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #6  
Old December 18th 18, 03:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 613
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Tuesday, 18 December 2018 10:07:14 UTC, Martin Brown wrote:
On 18/12/2018 08:07, Mark Carver wrote:
On 17/12/2018 18:55, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted
Gigabit FTTP.


The big benefit with FTTP, (even if 90% of the punters don't consciously
realise it) is the stability of connection.

Just as FTTC is a half step to that over ADSL.


Axtually on elderly copper lines it isn't.

Our neighbouring village has FTTC. I amd too far away and on basic ADSL
(but a particularly good circuit after much complaining). My connection
is stable. The people on faster FFTC are forever showing me their
connection stability problems and woes over the same set of cables.

I am too far from their cabinet to ever beenfit.

I can belive that FTTP or cable would be more stable since there would
be no archaic wire in the way. When I was on cable I can't recall ever
having a connectivity loss that wasn't caused by a mains power cut.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


My experience (all BT) is as follows: -

Late 1990's ISDN at 64kbps; BERR zero

Early 2000's DSL intially 500k down and 128k up (at the office) and later 1M down. BERR very low.

~2006 - BT business free upgrade to 8Mbps down and 1Mbps up. Rock solid and no contention.

~2010 - FTTC available. Normal broadband increased to ~13mbps down.

~2013 - onto FTTC getting about 32Mbps down

2016 - speeded up to ~40Mbps

2017 - now ~52Mbps - maximum at my distance from the cabinet, so not worth paying for 76 or 100Mbps
  #7  
Old January 1st 19, 12:40 PM
kinshasa kinshasa is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by R. Mark Clayton[_2_] View Post
On Tuesday, 18 December 2018 10:07:14 UTC, Martin Brown wrote:
On 18/12/2018 08:07, Mark Carver wrote:
On 17/12/2018 18:55, R. Mark Clayton wrote:


It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted
Gigabit FTTP.


The big benefit with FTTP, (even if 90% of the punters don't consciously
realise it) is the stability of connection.

Just as FTTC is a half step to that over ADSL.


Axtually on elderly copper lines it isn't.

Our neighbouring village has FTTC. I amd too far away and on basic ADSL
(but a particularly good circuit after much complaining). My connection
is stable. The people on faster FFTC are forever showing me their
connection stability problems and woes over the same set of cables.

I am too far from their cabinet to ever beenfit.

I can belive that FTTP or cable would be more stable since there would
be no archaic wire in the way. When I was on cable I can't recall ever
having a connectivity loss that wasn't caused by a mains power cut.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


My experience (all BT) is as follows: -

Late 1990's ISDN at 64kbps; BERR zero

Early 2000's DSL intially 500k down and 128k up (at the office) and later 1M down. BERR very low.

~2006 - BT business free upgrade to 8Mbps down and 1Mbps up. Rock solid and no contention.

~2010 - FTTC available. Normal broadband increased to ~13mbps down.

~2013 - onto FTTC getting about 32Mbps down

2016 - speeded up to ~40Mbps

2017 - now ~52Mbps - maximum at my distance from the cabinet, so not worth paying for 76 or 100Mbps
I too think that FTTC/FTTP is more of a marketing gimmick for most residential customers. I am on ADSL and my line syncs reliably at maybe 6.5 Mb . The only trouble is that it the world of ADSL/openreach/ISPs and BT wholesale as well as the plethora of LLU and contractors,there are too many fingers in the pie messing it all up. See my posting above.

Instead of marketing what they call "speed" they should call it something else,,maybe "capacity". Whats the point of having a line with a max capacity of 20/40 Mb when there is nothing much being sent fro it? I find on my 7M line i can HD stream from netflix etc no problem and no buffering.
  #8  
Old January 2nd 19, 11:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Gabriel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

In article ,
"R. Mark Clayton" writes:
It was always a fallacy that residential users all desperately wanted Gigabit FTTP. In fact most of them are happy as long as they can stream full HD, which is nearly possible on direct connection and easy on FTTC.

It is also a fallacy that residential customers could even use Gigabit FTTP - what for? Big updates and cloud back up can happily trundle away in the background, some cloud apps even let you limit bandwidth intentionally.

Moreover if there is any sort of premium to go [much] faster at least half of them won't pay it.


I work from home (remotely) on IT, and have an ADSL line that runs at
close to 20Mbits/s. I could upgrade this to FTTC easily, but I stuggle
to justify it - I don't need anything faster than I have at the moment.
I don't stream HD - I rarely watch films/TV at all.

What I do need is excellent tech support when it breaks, routable IP
addresses, etc. Speed and cheap are not priorities. I'm with AAISP
for their excellent support.

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back
up to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #9  
Old January 2nd 19, 12:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Eager[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.


I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?
  #10  
Old January 2nd 19, 01:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 613
Default Half of UK homes could get faster broadband

On Wednesday, 2 January 2019 12:55:44 UTC, Bob Eager wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:48:40 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Something that would make me consider FTTC or FTTP is if it was more
reliable than my ADSL. I don't have any major issue with ADSL
reliability.
Once every few years the speed starts dropping. I found that momentarily
connecting an inductor across the incoming line and disconnecting it
(making a tiny spark) instantly fixes this, and speed pops right back up
to almost 20Mbits/s again. This suggests there is a connection in my
line which is failing and the back-EMF from the inductor breaks down the
oxide formed in it and gets it working again (for another few years).
At least I can see this starting to happen very clearly on AAISP's
constant quality monitoring graphs, and my fix lasts years.


I had this problem when the tie line between the FTTC cabinet and the
normal cab started to fail (they are a few metres apart in different
roads). I was able to get it going again (sometimes for only minutes
though) with the usual trick of calling the phone on that line to
generate ring current.

I am considering moving to a dedicated, no-calls line wit AAISP, and that
trick won't work any more, so the inductor trick sounds useful. What did
you use?


Indeed - calling the number and letting it ring for a while would often improve low signal or noisy lines.
 




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