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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house



 
 
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  #21  
Old June 24th 19, 12:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Michael Chare[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On 23/06/2019 20:15, NY wrote:
"Tim+" wrote in message
news:1642906843.582930500.152130.tim.downie- A more expensive option
would
be to have a mesh wifi network.
This might make it easier for a wifi device to move from one access
point to another.

See www.bestadvisers.co.uk/mesh-wifi


+1 to mesh systems.

We have the BT mesh system. Prior to this our mobile devices would
connect
and hang on like grime death to the “wrong” access point when we moved
around and it was a pain in the arse constantly having to manually
reconnect to the strongest signal.* Since fitting the mesh system, we
have
seamless connectivity all around the house.

No commercial interest, just a happy customer.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi, Pack of 3 Discs, Mesh Wi-Fi for seamless, speedy
(AC2533) connection, Wi-Fi everywhere in medium to large homes, App for
complete control and 2 year warranty
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01NBMMV..._JJPdDbQ3MNC38


Looking at reviews and user manuals for mesh systems (eg Linksys Velop) it
seems very vague as to how you connect the first mesh device in the
chain to
the router for internet access - not so much the physical Ethernet
connection but any customisation of the router that may or may not be
required. There's also the suggestion in some user comments to reviews such
as https://uk.pcmag.com/wi-fi-mesh-netw.../linksys-velop
that they do not implement a true daisy-chain mesh (router to A, A to B, B
to C) but instead require all the devices to be in range of the master one
that is connected to the router, which is fine for covering a roughly
circular area, but no use for a long thin (maybe L-shaped) house where the
router is at one end of the house.

I have router (TP-Link 9980) which has all the capabilities that I need:
address reservation (effectively static IP addresses implemented by DHCP)
and port forwarding/mapping (eg public-IP:81 - private-IP1:80,
public-ip:82 - private-IP2:80 etc).

The fact that some of these mesh devices have their own port-forwarding
suggests that it may "fight" with any port-forwarding I set up in the
router. I've also seen statements that seem to imply that the mesh devices
have their own DHCP server, so negating the fixed-IP-by-DHCP that the
router
offers. Fixed IP is essential: I have some devices (Raspberry Pi running
TVHeadend PVR software and Cumulus weather station software; various
security cameras) which implement web servers on specific ports for
controlling/accessing the PVR, weather station, camera, and these do not
integrate with standard name services such as NetBIOS, so you *have* to
refer to the devices by a fixed IP address (eg 192.168.1.72:9981 for TV
Headend, 192.168.1.72:8998 for Cumulus). Obviously I *could* set up static
IPs on the devices (hopefully the DHCP server in a mesh can be
configured to
put those addresses outside its scope) but it is *much* easier to do it by
address reservation in DHCP, because this means that a portable device such
as a laptop will always get the same address when it is connected to the
home network but will still get an appropriate non-static address when
connected to other networks away from home.


I get the impression that mesh systems try to replicate (incompletely) too
much of the functionality that is done better by a dedicated router,
instead
of sticking to one single task: providing seamless wifi coverage over an
area that is too large for the router's own wifi to cover.


Certainly some of the products would allow you to optionally just
establish a PPPoE to your ISP using a modem rather than a router. Would
work with ISPs such as Plusnet and Vodafone.


--
Michael Chare
  #22  
Old June 24th 19, 01:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Maurice
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 37
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

Rather than looking for an ethernet/wifi extender, what we need is just a
stronger WiFi
signal in the lounge for smartphone use, given a Netgear DG834G router
elsewhere for
general PC use.

So looking for a homeplug kind of solution, i.e. plug one end into spare
socket on
Netgear router and the extender plug into a mains socket, with a
corresponding unit
plugged into a mains socket in the lounge to provide a copy of the
router's WiFi signal
there.

Suggestions most welcome!

Many thanks...

--
/\/\aurice (Retired in E.Hants)
(Replace "nomail.afraid" by "bcs" to reply by email)
  #23  
Old June 24th 19, 02:46 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Maurice
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 37
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On Mon, 24 Jun 2019 12:04:00 +0000, I wrote:

So looking for a homeplug kind of solution,


Just found this;

https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-WPA7510K...der-Broadband-
Configuration/dp/
B0723C86CX/ref=sr_1_6?
adgrpid=54737816858&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_fKbxZqC4wIV ia3tCh1-
YAVLEAAYASAAEgIpTfD_BwE&hvadid=259137431953&hvdev= c&hvlocphy=1006801&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&
hvqmt=e&hvrand=17038396758639794228&hvtargid=kwd-300059920235&hydadcr=25458_1819751&
keywords=tp+link+ac750&qid=1561382598&s=gateway&sr =8-6

Anyone know of any problems?

--
/\/\aurice
(Replace "nomail.afraid" by "bcs" to reply by email)
  #24  
Old June 24th 19, 09:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 613
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On Sunday, 23 June 2019 09:46:51 UTC+1, David wrote:
On Sat, 22 Jun 2019 16:26:43 +0100, NY wrote:

"Bob Henson" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:

We've moved into a house with fairly thick internal walls (*). The
router's wifi does not cover the whole house.

As a first attempt to solve this, I tried a Homeplug/Wifi adaptor,
connected over mains wiring to another Homeplug device that is plugged
into the router. However over-the-mains connection speed drops to
about 5 Mbps within a couple of rooms and is undetectable further away
than that

That's odd - you shouldn't lose any significant speed over reasonable
distance via the mains. I have old routers used as access points over
Gigabit adaptors on the next two floors up from the main router and
there's no significant speed loss at all. Maybe your Homeplug/WiFi unit
wasn't man enough? Or very noisy mains? If possible, I would stick to
the Homeplug setup anyway. A not necessarily too expensive option if
they serve your area is the switch to BT Plus and get their guaranteed
signal in every room setup - that sounds easy but a bit defeatist to me
:-)


Yes I was wondering about noisy mains. Two devices (Dlink Powerline AV
TPlink TL-WPA4220) achieve speeds of about 300 Mbps (as reported by the
TPlink) when they are plugged into sockets in the same room, but this
falls off rapidly to under 100 Mbps when they are a couple of room
apart, and drops to about 5-10 Mbps by the time they are about 20 metres
apart. There is the added complication that the house has two separate
"fuse boxes" (consumer units) but they both connect to the same meter,
and anyway, the 5-10 Mbps is (as far as I know) between sockets served
by the same fuse box.

snip

If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


Or if it is a big house more than one ring or perhaps a special spur to things like the boiler, burglar alarm etc.



Cheers



Dave R




--
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  #25  
Old June 24th 19, 10:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


Or if it is a big house more than one ring or perhaps a special spur to
things like the boiler, burglar alarm etc.


Some time when I'm feeling brave I'll have to turn off each MCB at the
consumer unit in turn and see what stops working. Most of the switches are
labelled fairly well, but there is no way of knowing which sockets are on
which ring, and whether any sockets are spurs from non-ring MCBs like boiler
etc. Shame the electrician who wired the house didn't leave a plan of how
everything was connected - or if he did, that this wasn't passed on to us as
the next owners after the ones who commissioned the work.

The joys of buying a house that has been built in stages over the years,
with two CUs and at least two rings on each CU. As I understand it, when one
of the extensions was built, there was no space for any more MCBs in the
original CU, so another connection was made to the electricity company fuse,
so the input to a second CU in another part of the house was in parallel
with the input to the original CU.

The other "funny" is that many of the rooms have an array of downlighter
mini spotlights in the ceiling, but each one of these has its own
240V-to-12V transformer and all the bulbs are 12V ones rather than 240V
GU10. That rather screws up our attempt to replace some of the bulbs with
either simple LED (much less power than tungstens) or else Philips Hue so
they can be controlled remotely for dimming or timed security lights. We may
have to replace upwards of 20 12V fittings per room with GU10 ones, removing
each transformer and connecting the GU10 to the mains cable that currently
feeds that light fitting's transformer. At least the transformers are
accessible in-line ones which can be accessed by removing the 12V fitting
and pulling gently, and have not been screwed to the ceiling joists. That
really would have been a show-stopper if it had been necessary to lift
floors to get at transformers and their mains feeds.

  #26  
Old June 24th 19, 11:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tim+[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 160
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to givecoverage throughout house

NY wrote:
"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


Or if it is a big house more than one ring or perhaps a special spur to
things like the boiler, burglar alarm etc.


Some time when I'm feeling brave I'll have to turn off each MCB at the
consumer unit in turn and see what stops working. Most of the switches are
labelled fairly well, but there is no way of knowing which sockets are on
which ring, and whether any sockets are spurs from non-ring MCBs like boiler
etc. Shame the electrician who wired the house didn't leave a plan of how
everything was connected - or if he did, that this wasn't passed on to us as
the next owners after the ones who commissioned the work.

The joys of buying a house that has been built in stages over the years,
with two CUs and at least two rings on each CU. As I understand it, when one
of the extensions was built, there was no space for any more MCBs in the
original CU, so another connection was made to the electricity company fuse,
so the input to a second CU in another part of the house was in parallel
with the input to the original CU.

The other "funny" is that many of the rooms have an array of downlighter
mini spotlights in the ceiling, but each one of these has its own
240V-to-12V transformer and all the bulbs are 12V ones rather than 240V
GU10. That rather screws up our attempt to replace some of the bulbs with
either simple LED (much less power than tungstens) or else Philips Hue so
they can be controlled remotely for dimming or timed security lights. We may
have to replace upwards of 20 12V fittings per room with GU10 ones, removing
each transformer and connecting the GU10 to the mains cable that currently
feeds that light fitting's transformer.


Or just buy M16 12V LED bulbs...

Tim


--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #27  
Old June 25th 19, 06:54 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 750
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On Mon 24/06/2019 23:17, Tim+ wrote:
NY wrote:
"R. Mark Clayton" wrote in message
...
If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.

Or if it is a big house more than one ring or perhaps a special spur to
things like the boiler, burglar alarm etc.


Some time when I'm feeling brave I'll have to turn off each MCB at the
consumer unit in turn and see what stops working. Most of the switches are
labelled fairly well, but there is no way of knowing which sockets are on
which ring, and whether any sockets are spurs from non-ring MCBs like boiler
etc. Shame the electrician who wired the house didn't leave a plan of how
everything was connected - or if he did, that this wasn't passed on to us as
the next owners after the ones who commissioned the work.

The joys of buying a house that has been built in stages over the years,
with two CUs and at least two rings on each CU. As I understand it, when one
of the extensions was built, there was no space for any more MCBs in the
original CU, so another connection was made to the electricity company fuse,
so the input to a second CU in another part of the house was in parallel
with the input to the original CU.

The other "funny" is that many of the rooms have an array of downlighter
mini spotlights in the ceiling, but each one of these has its own
240V-to-12V transformer and all the bulbs are 12V ones rather than 240V
GU10. That rather screws up our attempt to replace some of the bulbs with
either simple LED (much less power than tungstens) or else Philips Hue so
they can be controlled remotely for dimming or timed security lights. We may
have to replace upwards of 20 12V fittings per room with GU10 ones, removing
each transformer and connecting the GU10 to the mains cable that currently
feeds that light fitting's transformer.


Or just buy M16 12V LED bulbs...


or if the 240-12 transformers are the electronic variety just fit dimmers?


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  #28  
Old June 25th 19, 11:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 561
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

On Mon, 24 Jun 2019 22:55:00 +0100, "NY" wrote:

Some time when I'm feeling brave I'll have to turn off each MCB at the
consumer unit in turn and see what stops working. Most of the switches are
labelled fairly well, but there is no way of knowing which sockets are on
which ring, and whether any sockets are spurs from non-ring MCBs like boiler
etc. Shame the electrician who wired the house didn't leave a plan of how
everything was connected - or if he did, that this wasn't passed on to us as
the next owners after the ones who commissioned the work.


Maybe I've been spoiled by a lifetime of working with professional
broadcast installations, but it astounds me that anyone would ever
consider wiring anything without diagrams and labels. And yet, even
though household distribution boxes always have some sort of provision
for labelling the fuses or breakers, hardly anyone ever bothers to use
them. One of the first things I did when I moved in was exactly what
you describe above - to turn main switches on and off and pull fuses
to see what was affected - and then *label* them!

Look at the wall sockets in any large corporate or institutional
building, an office complex or a hospital for example, and you'll see
that they're all numbered. Somewhere there will be a list or a plan
and labelled breakers, so it will be possible to isolate just what's
needed for somebody to work on it without disabling anything vital.
Knowing where to find things is such a simple concept it's a mystery
to me why it isn't standard everywhere.

If you were to ask a random selection of ordinary people "Do you know
how to switch off the gas, the water, or the electricity in your house
and how quickly could you do this in an emergency?" I wonder how many
sensible answers you'd get.

Rod.

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  #29  
Old June 25th 19, 01:07 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 193
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On 24/06/2019 14:46, Maurice wrote:
On Mon, 24 Jun 2019 12:04:00 +0000, I wrote:

So looking for a homeplug kind of solution,


Just found this;

https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-WPA7510K...der-Broadband-
Configuration/dp/
B0723C86CX/ref=sr_1_6?
adgrpid=54737816858&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_fKbxZqC4wIV ia3tCh1-
YAVLEAAYASAAEgIpTfD_BwE&hvadid=259137431953&hvdev= c&hvlocphy=1006801&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&
hvqmt=e&hvrand=17038396758639794228&hvtargid=kwd-300059920235&hydadcr=25458_1819751&
keywords=tp+link+ac750&qid=1561382598&s=gateway&sr =8-6

Anyone know of any problems?


The only likely probem is that if its plug and play mode doesn't do
exactly what you want it may take some tedious trial and error to get it
configured to your liking. The one I got was simple to use as a basic
repeater out of the box but I wanted to use it in a more esoteric mode.

Most of these things will work fine if you want a basic Wifi network
booster - it is only when you try to do something a bit more unusual
that you find the manual is less than informative.

Obviously if you have a strange mains wiring configuration and no ring
main then things will be rather less satisfactory. That said my ethernet
over mains supports a remote printer on a separate consumer unit. I have
never bothered to measure the speed. I was just surprised it worked.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #30  
Old June 25th 19, 03:27 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Maurice
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 37
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On Tue, 25 Jun 2019 13:07:31 +0100, Martin Brown wrote:

That said my ethernet over mains supports a remote printer on a separate
consumer unit


We already have ethernet-over-mains to the SO's PC.

What we are after is also WiFi over the mains, so will give the T-Link
gadget a try.

Regards,
--
/\/\aurice
(Replace "nomail.afraid" by "bcs" to reply by email)
 




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