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Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 22nd 19, 10:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tim+[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to givecoverage throughout house

Michael Chare wrote:
On 22/06/2019 12:01, NY wrote:
We've moved into a house with fairly thick internal walls (*). The
router's wifi does not cover the whole house.

As a first attempt to solve this, I tried a Homeplug/Wifi adaptor,
connected over mains wiring to another Homeplug device that is plugged
into the router. However over-the-mains connection speed drops to about
5 Mbps within a couple of rooms and is undetectable further away than
that - and anyway, Homeplug is "deprecated" as a means of communication
if there are any radio hams in the area ;-)

So resort to Plan B: a long length of Ethernet cable in the loft to an
access point (or two) in other parts of the house.



*The question*

What is the best advice for multiple wifi access points (including the
one in the router)? Should they all have the same channel and the same
SSID, or should each have a different channel (subject to the 1, 6, 11
non-overlapping channels) and/or a different but related SSID (eg
"base", "base-ext1", "base-ext2")? We're getting a fair amount of
interference on at least one of the three "magic" channels (1, 6, 11)
from neighbours' networks, so we don't have the luxury of the whole of
the 2.4 GHz spectrum.




We're wanting 2.4 GHz to be compatible with older devices that can't use
5 GHz, and also for the greater coverage / smaller attenuation of 2.4. 5
GHz in addition is a bonus, subject to the proviso that its range is
much smaller.

It is quite likely that there will be a fair amount of overlap between
the different access points - but as far as I can tell, one remote
access point on its own (in addition to the router's) will probably not
cover everywhere that we want, so we are probably looking at two
extension APs in different parts of the house, each fed by Ethernet.

One of the problems I have at present is not having the Ethernet cable,
so I can only test signal strength in numerical terms (dB) using
InSSIDer, without actually testing data transfer rate.

Obviously the speed to the outside world will be limited to that of the
VDSL (FTTC) connection, but we may want faster connections between
computers in the house.


Is there any disadvantage of using an old ADSL router (with DHCP turned
off, and with no connection to the ADSL RJ11 phone port) as an AP, and
as a network switch to continue the Ethernet to a second AP? I need to
make sure that the AP router's own LAN address is set statically to one
which is outside the real router's scope. This seems to work perfectly
when connected by a short patch cable (all I can test until I get the 40
m cable to go in the loft), but I want to know if there are any problems
with doing it this way - am I better buying a dedicated AP than reusing
surplus kit?


(*) Parts of the house are an 1850s stone cottage which has been
extended with 1990s brick building making an L-shape. The router is best
sited (for connection to my PCs) at one end of the L - so not a very
central position :-(


A more expensive option would be to have a mesh wifi network.
This might make it easier for a wifi device to move from one access
point to another.

See www.bestadvisers.co.uk/mesh-wifi


+1 to mesh systems.

We have the BT mesh system. Prior to this our mobile devices would connect
and hang on like grime death to the “wrong” access point when we moved
around and it was a pain in the arse constantly having to manually
reconnect to the strongest signal. Since fitting the mesh system, we have
seamless connectivity all around the house.

No commercial interest, just a happy customer.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi, Pack of 3 Discs, Mesh Wi-Fi for seamless, speedy
(AC2533) connection, Wi-Fi everywhere in medium to large homes, App for
complete control and 2 year warranty
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01NBMMV..._JJPdDbQ3MNC38

Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #12  
Old June 22nd 19, 10:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

"Woody" wrote in message
...

Just get one of those TP-Link adapters. It can either be used as a relay
(if you position it well) or wired back as a WAPI if not.

Have had a couple of those for some time and they work well.

One tip: make sure the DHCP is turned off or you might find sometimes that
things have logged on and have their gateway as the adapter's address and
not the address of your main router - hence you cannot get on line.


I've had the symptom occasionally: computers on the network occasionally get
given the gateway address of the TP-Link Homeplug/Wifi/Ethernet device,
even though there is nothing in the device about DHCP, so there is no DHCP
server within the device to be turned off.

I think I'll be ordering a long length of flat Cat 5/6/7 and drilling a hole
in the ceiling to route the cable to another router acting as an AP (DHCP
off), with maybe a second router-AP elsewhere if needed.

It's a shame that the kitchen has a solid floor so I can't tuck a flat cable
down the edge of its carpet to avoid going up into the loft. Maybe I can
tape the cable to the kick space under the kitchen cupboards.

  #13  
Old June 23rd 19, 09:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On Sat, 22 Jun 2019 16:26:43 +0100, NY wrote:

"Bob Henson" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:

We've moved into a house with fairly thick internal walls (*). The
router's wifi does not cover the whole house.

As a first attempt to solve this, I tried a Homeplug/Wifi adaptor,
connected over mains wiring to another Homeplug device that is plugged
into the router. However over-the-mains connection speed drops to
about 5 Mbps within a couple of rooms and is undetectable further away
than that


That's odd - you shouldn't lose any significant speed over reasonable
distance via the mains. I have old routers used as access points over
Gigabit adaptors on the next two floors up from the main router and
there's no significant speed loss at all. Maybe your Homeplug/WiFi unit
wasn't man enough? Or very noisy mains? If possible, I would stick to
the Homeplug setup anyway. A not necessarily too expensive option if
they serve your area is the switch to BT Plus and get their guaranteed
signal in every room setup - that sounds easy but a bit defeatist to me
:-)


Yes I was wondering about noisy mains. Two devices (Dlink Powerline AV
TPlink TL-WPA4220) achieve speeds of about 300 Mbps (as reported by the
TPlink) when they are plugged into sockets in the same room, but this
falls off rapidly to under 100 Mbps when they are a couple of room
apart, and drops to about 5-10 Mbps by the time they are about 20 metres
apart. There is the added complication that the house has two separate
"fuse boxes" (consumer units) but they both connect to the same meter,
and anyway, the 5-10 Mbps is (as far as I know) between sockets served
by the same fuse box.

snip

If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


Cheers



Dave R




--
AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #14  
Old June 23rd 19, 10:16 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tweed[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 85
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to givecoverage throughout house

Tim+ wrote:
Michael Chare wrote:
On 22/06/2019 12:01, NY wrote:
We've moved into a house with fairly thick internal walls (*). The
router's wifi does not cover the whole house.

As a first attempt to solve this, I tried a Homeplug/Wifi adaptor,
connected over mains wiring to another Homeplug device that is plugged
into the router. However over-the-mains connection speed drops to about
5 Mbps within a couple of rooms and is undetectable further away than
that - and anyway, Homeplug is "deprecated" as a means of communication
if there are any radio hams in the area ;-)

So resort to Plan B: a long length of Ethernet cable in the loft to an
access point (or two) in other parts of the house.



*The question*

What is the best advice for multiple wifi access points (including the
one in the router)? Should they all have the same channel and the same
SSID, or should each have a different channel (subject to the 1, 6, 11
non-overlapping channels) and/or a different but related SSID (eg
"base", "base-ext1", "base-ext2")? We're getting a fair amount of
interference on at least one of the three "magic" channels (1, 6, 11)
from neighbours' networks, so we don't have the luxury of the whole of
the 2.4 GHz spectrum.




We're wanting 2.4 GHz to be compatible with older devices that can't use
5 GHz, and also for the greater coverage / smaller attenuation of 2.4. 5
GHz in addition is a bonus, subject to the proviso that its range is
much smaller.

It is quite likely that there will be a fair amount of overlap between
the different access points - but as far as I can tell, one remote
access point on its own (in addition to the router's) will probably not
cover everywhere that we want, so we are probably looking at two
extension APs in different parts of the house, each fed by Ethernet.

One of the problems I have at present is not having the Ethernet cable,
so I can only test signal strength in numerical terms (dB) using
InSSIDer, without actually testing data transfer rate.

Obviously the speed to the outside world will be limited to that of the
VDSL (FTTC) connection, but we may want faster connections between
computers in the house.


Is there any disadvantage of using an old ADSL router (with DHCP turned
off, and with no connection to the ADSL RJ11 phone port) as an AP, and
as a network switch to continue the Ethernet to a second AP? I need to
make sure that the AP router's own LAN address is set statically to one
which is outside the real router's scope. This seems to work perfectly
when connected by a short patch cable (all I can test until I get the 40
m cable to go in the loft), but I want to know if there are any problems
with doing it this way - am I better buying a dedicated AP than reusing
surplus kit?


(*) Parts of the house are an 1850s stone cottage which has been
extended with 1990s brick building making an L-shape. The router is best
sited (for connection to my PCs) at one end of the L - so not a very
central position :-(


A more expensive option would be to have a mesh wifi network.
This might make it easier for a wifi device to move from one access
point to another.

See www.bestadvisers.co.uk/mesh-wifi


+1 to mesh systems.

We have the BT mesh system. Prior to this our mobile devices would connect
and hang on like grime death to the “wrong” access point when we moved
around and it was a pain in the arse constantly having to manually
reconnect to the strongest signal. Since fitting the mesh system, we have
seamless connectivity all around the house.

No commercial interest, just a happy customer.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi, Pack of 3 Discs, Mesh Wi-Fi for seamless, speedy
(AC2533) connection, Wi-Fi everywhere in medium to large homes, App for
complete control and 2 year warranty
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01NBMMV..._JJPdDbQ3MNC38

Tim


+1 I've used a three unit BT Whole Home WiFi set up in a three storey
student house which my son rented. Easy to set up and works very well. They
were on a 300 Mbit/sec Virgin setup and this setup maintained this
throughput throughout most of the house.

  #15  
Old June 23rd 19, 08:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

"Tim+" wrote in message
news:1642906843.582930500.152130.tim.downie- A more expensive option would
be to have a mesh wifi network.
This might make it easier for a wifi device to move from one access
point to another.

See www.bestadvisers.co.uk/mesh-wifi


+1 to mesh systems.

We have the BT mesh system. Prior to this our mobile devices would connect
and hang on like grime death to the “wrong” access point when we moved
around and it was a pain in the arse constantly having to manually
reconnect to the strongest signal. Since fitting the mesh system, we have
seamless connectivity all around the house.

No commercial interest, just a happy customer.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi, Pack of 3 Discs, Mesh Wi-Fi for seamless, speedy
(AC2533) connection, Wi-Fi everywhere in medium to large homes, App for
complete control and 2 year warranty
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01NBMMV..._JJPdDbQ3MNC38


Looking at reviews and user manuals for mesh systems (eg Linksys Velop) it
seems very vague as to how you connect the first mesh device in the chain to
the router for internet access - not so much the physical Ethernet
connection but any customisation of the router that may or may not be
required. There's also the suggestion in some user comments to reviews such
as https://uk.pcmag.com/wi-fi-mesh-netw.../linksys-velop
that they do not implement a true daisy-chain mesh (router to A, A to B, B
to C) but instead require all the devices to be in range of the master one
that is connected to the router, which is fine for covering a roughly
circular area, but no use for a long thin (maybe L-shaped) house where the
router is at one end of the house.

I have router (TP-Link 9980) which has all the capabilities that I need:
address reservation (effectively static IP addresses implemented by DHCP)
and port forwarding/mapping (eg public-IP:81 - private-IP1:80,
public-ip:82 - private-IP2:80 etc).

The fact that some of these mesh devices have their own port-forwarding
suggests that it may "fight" with any port-forwarding I set up in the
router. I've also seen statements that seem to imply that the mesh devices
have their own DHCP server, so negating the fixed-IP-by-DHCP that the router
offers. Fixed IP is essential: I have some devices (Raspberry Pi running
TVHeadend PVR software and Cumulus weather station software; various
security cameras) which implement web servers on specific ports for
controlling/accessing the PVR, weather station, camera, and these do not
integrate with standard name services such as NetBIOS, so you *have* to
refer to the devices by a fixed IP address (eg 192.168.1.72:9981 for TV
Headend, 192.168.1.72:8998 for Cumulus). Obviously I *could* set up static
IPs on the devices (hopefully the DHCP server in a mesh can be configured to
put those addresses outside its scope) but it is *much* easier to do it by
address reservation in DHCP, because this means that a portable device such
as a laptop will always get the same address when it is connected to the
home network but will still get an appropriate non-static address when
connected to other networks away from home.


I get the impression that mesh systems try to replicate (incompletely) too
much of the functionality that is done better by a dedicated router, instead
of sticking to one single task: providing seamless wifi coverage over an
area that is too large for the router's own wifi to cover.

  #16  
Old June 23rd 19, 08:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

"David" wrote in message
...
If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


It is quite possible that the Powerline adapters are on different rings,
though hopefully in my case they are connected to the same consumer unit.
Being restricted to sockets that are on the same ring would severely curtail
the usefulness of the devices, since my house seems to have several rings,
some on one CU and some on the other, and each with its own RCD (*). My
understanding was that you only have problems if the devices have to span
CUs and/or electricity meters. Is it a problem even if you go from one ring
to another in the same CU?


(*) As opposed to a single RCD between the CU and the electricity company
fuse, which cuts power to the whole house if there is an earth leakage fault
anywhere.

  #17  
Old June 23rd 19, 10:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tim+[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to givecoverage throughout house

NY wrote:
"Tim+" wrote in message
news:1642906843.582930500.152130.tim.downie- A more expensive option would
be to have a mesh wifi network.
This might make it easier for a wifi device to move from one access
point to another.

See www.bestadvisers.co.uk/mesh-wifi


+1 to mesh systems.

We have the BT mesh system. Prior to this our mobile devices would connect
and hang on like grime death to the “wrong” access point when we moved
around and it was a pain in the arse constantly having to manually
reconnect to the strongest signal. Since fitting the mesh system, we have
seamless connectivity all around the house.

No commercial interest, just a happy customer.

BT Whole Home Wi-Fi, Pack of 3 Discs, Mesh Wi-Fi for seamless, speedy
(AC2533) connection, Wi-Fi everywhere in medium to large homes, App for
complete control and 2 year warranty
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01NBMMV..._JJPdDbQ3MNC38


Looking at reviews and user manuals for mesh systems (eg Linksys Velop) it
seems very vague as to how you connect the first mesh device in the chain to
the router for internet access - not so much the physical Ethernet
connection but any customisation of the router that may or may not be
required.


None. Plug cable in. That's it.

There's also the suggestion in some user comments to reviews such
as https://uk.pcmag.com/wi-fi-mesh-netw.../linksys-velop
that they do not implement a true daisy-chain mesh (router to A, A to B, B
to C) but instead require all the devices to be in range of the master one
that is connected to the router, which is fine for covering a roughly
circular area, but no use for a long thin (maybe L-shaped) house where the
router is at one end of the house.


Nope, well at least not with my BT mesh system. You can view the
connections with a phone app and I can clearly see how mine daisy chain.

snip

I get the impression that mesh systems try to replicate (incompletely) too
much of the functionality that is done better by a dedicated router, instead
of sticking to one single task: providing seamless wifi coverage over an
area that is too large for the router's own wifi to cover.


I have the experience rather than the impression that seamless Wi-Fi
coverage is exactly what my mesh system does.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #18  
Old June 23rd 19, 11:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MissRiaElaine[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 204
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On 23/06/2019 20:15, NY wrote:
"David" wrote in message
...
If the Powerline adapters are on the same ring, are you sure the ring
isn't broken between them?

It is very difficult to detect this, but a bad or broken connection could
be sending the signal back through the fuse box.


It is quite possible that the Powerline adapters are on different rings,
though hopefully in my case they are connected to the same consumer unit.
Being restricted to sockets that are on the same ring would severely
curtail
the usefulness of the devices, since my house seems to have several rings,
some on one CU and some on the other, and each with its own RCD (*). My
understanding was that you only have problems if the devices have to span
CUs and/or electricity meters. Is it a problem even if you go from one ring
to another in the same CU?


(*) As opposed to a single RCD between the CU and the electricity company
fuse, which cuts power to the whole house if there is an earth leakage
fault
anywhere.


If they're on the same *phase* then they should work. There shouldn't be
a problem in the average domestic situation.

--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #19  
Old June 24th 19, 08:51 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 193
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coveragethroughout house

On 22/06/2019 19:44, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Saturday, 22 June 2019 12:01:46 UTC+1, NY wrote:
We've moved into a house with fairly thick internal walls (*). The
router's wifi does not cover the whole house.

As a first attempt to solve this, I tried a Homeplug/Wifi adaptor,
connected over mains wiring to another Homeplug device that is
plugged into the router. However over-the-mains connection speed
drops to about 5 Mbps within a couple of rooms and is undetectable
further away than that - and anyway,


That suggests that your mains wiring has curious non-standard topology
and possibly multiple consumer units with separate ring mains. That or a
hell of a lot of capacitive load somewhere across live an neutral.

Homeplug is "deprecated" as a means of communication if there are
any radio hams in the area ;-)


Only by radio hams. They should work well enough on normal mains wiring.

So resort to Plan B: a long length of Ethernet cable in the loft to
an access point (or two) in other parts of the house.

*The question*

What is the best advice for multiple wifi access points (including
the one in the router)? Should they all have the same channel and
the same SSID, or should each have a different channel (subject to
the 1, 6, 11 non-overlapping channels) and/or a different but
related SSID (eg "base", "base-ext1", "base-ext2")? We're getting a
fair amount of interference on at least one of the three "magic"
channels (1, 6, 11) from neighbours' networks, so we don't have the
luxury of the whole of the 2.4 GHz spectrum.


Use the two that are least interfered with then.

We're wanting 2.4 GHz to be compatible with older devices that
can't use 5 GHz, and also for the greater coverage / smaller
attenuation of 2.4. 5 GHz in addition is a bonus, subject to the
proviso that its range is much smaller.

It is quite likely that there will be a fair amount of overlap
between the different access points - but as far as I can tell, one
remote access point on its own (in addition to the router's) will
probably not cover everywhere that we want, so we are probably
looking at two extension APs in different parts of the house, each
fed by Ethernet.


You can get plug and play repeaters that rebroadcast traffic that they
see from the main router in such away that the remote device can see it.
The hit is that you lose about half of your network bandwidth.

One of the problems I have at present is not having the Ethernet
cable, so I can only test signal strength in numerical terms (dB)
using InSSIDer, without actually testing data transfer rate.

Obviously the speed to the outside world will be limited to that of
the VDSL (FTTC) connection, but we may want faster connections
between computers in the house.

Is there any disadvantage of using an old ADSL router (with DHCP
turned off, and with no connection to the ADSL RJ11 phone port) as
an AP, and as a network switch to continue the Ethernet to a second
AP? I need to make sure that the AP router's own LAN address is set
statically to one which is outside the real router's scope. This
seems to work perfectly when connected by a short patch cable (all
I can test until I get the 40 m cable to go in the loft), but I
want to know if there are any problems with doing it this way - am
I better buying a dedicated AP than reusing surplus kit?


Surplus kit is fine provided that you make sure it doesn't try to issue
IP addresses on its own subnet.

(*) Parts of the house are an 1850s stone cottage which has been
extended with 1990s brick building making an L-shape. The router is
best sited (for connection to my PCs) at one end of the L - so not
a very central position :-(


Just get one of those TP-Link adapters. It can either be used as a
relay (if you position it well) or wired back as a WAPI if not.

They are cheap enough and worked fine for me after a bit of a fight
configuring it for use with wired ethernet in and pass through out +
Wifi. I gave it an SSID that is a synonym of my main network same
password and a different channel. That way they don't fight.

The one I have would work as a rebroadcast out of the box but required
some fairly painful setting up even for an expert working from the
sparse and cryptic Chinglish instruction leaflet. Basically the problem
was that in any of the more advanced modes its config page would be made
inaccessible by the very act of making it a dedicated slave to another
host. So you had to go round a hard reset and configure from scratch
loop until every time until it was exactly right.

ISTR it was 12 on Amazon (cheaper clone of TP-Link on special offer).
The only thing wrong with it apart from the poor instruction leaflet is
that apparently nobody told the makers that the earth pin of UK sockets
is at the top so it is up side down when used on a wall socket.

Mesh routers work better for really awkward buildings but I found that
the setup I configured covers all of my L shaped internal space.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #20  
Old June 24th 19, 12:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Advice on setting up multiple wifi networks to give coverage throughout house

"Martin Brown" wrote in message
...

Mesh routers work better for really awkward buildings but I found that the
setup I configured covers all of my L shaped internal space.


I'm still trying to work out whether mesh routers do what they say. Linksys
support say about the Velop that every child node must be able to talk to
the parent node (the one that is connected to the existing router/modem),
whereas for an L-shaped building with the existing router at one end, you
could have the parent only being able to talk to the nearest child which
then talks to the next and that to the next etc, with little or no direct
wifi from master to further child nodes.

Does the rebroadcasting of wifi networks for a mesh result in successive
halving of bandwidth, as for normal wireless repeaters?

Is it normal for mesh routers to replace most of the functionality of the
existing router (eg port forwarding/mapping, DHCP server with address
reservation for some devices), with that router only acting as a modem,
feeding *WAN* traffic (with no NAT stage) to the parent node which then does
all the NAT, firewall/port-forwarding and address-reservation?

Can most routers (eg my TP-Link 9980) be put into modem-only mode to feed
un-NATted traffic to a mesh parent node?


I'd envisaged the mesh network being connected to the existing,
conventionally-configured router, and simply taking over the wifi side of
things, with the existing router doing everything else, as before.

I'm also concerned that mesh systems such as Linksys Velop seem to use 5 GHz
as the vehicle for passing traffic between nodes, which means that they need
to be much closer than for 2.4 GHz and hence I may need almost one for every
room along the length of my house:

https://i.postimg.cc/0yDLX9fc/Velop.png

1 is the existing router and hence the parent node of the mesh (the position
of this is restricted by phone line and need to connect various devices
(Raspberry Pi as PVR, Roku box) by Ethernet, and to give best speed from
router to PCs in study, either by Powerline or 5 GHz wifi.

2, 3, 4 are approximate positions of child nodes *assuming 2.4 GHz* - ie 1
to 2, 2 to 3, 3 to 4 are "hops" close to the usable limit of 2.4 GHz.

The house is about 30 metres along each line of the L, with thick red lines
denoting 20 cm thick stone (I think) walls, inside and outside, with black
lines being more modern brick cavity walls or plasterboard on brick internal
walls. The first floor is above part of the ground floor as shown by the
thin red lines, with the rest being single storey. All windows are
double-glazed uPVC, with many having internal "simulated leaded lights"
dividers at about 20 cm intervals - ie roughly 2x 2.4 GHz and 3x 5 GHz
wavelengths.


To give an idea of existing reception conditions, 2.4 GHz is usable in the
room denoted by 3 and the larger one next to it, but 5 GHz is not. 2.4 GHz
reception is very poor in the conservatory and in the master bedroom on the
first floor above the ones on the ground floor, particularly on the left
hand side of the floorplan.


The existing Powerline repeater is placed in the corridor just outside the
door of the "3" bedroom, that being the last socket that is on the same CU
as "1" (though quite probably different ring mains); sockets from there
towards the conservatory are said to be on the second CU (which is in the
wardrobe of "3" bedroom).

Powerline speeds (with one adaptor in "1" next to the router) and the other
wifi-enabled one in the stated places, a

- 300 Mbps in an adjacent socket to "1" or in the study to the right
- 100 Mbps in a socket in the kitchen next to the utility room
- 50 Mbps in a socket in the entrance hall next to the dining room
- 10 to 15 Mbps in a socket on the wall just outside the door of "3" bedroom
- no connection for any sockets along the passage towards the conservatory

So Powerline speeds decrease rapidly as I move from the router's Powerline
adaptor. These are the speeds reported by the TP-Link wifi Powerline device
when talking to the router's Powerline.

Powerline devices a

- Dlink Powerline AV 500 DHP-500AV ("1" at router)
- TP-Link TL-WPA4220 (outside "3" bedroom or in various places listed above)


Another possibility is to run a cable through the roofspace between "1" and
the dressing room next to the master bedroom and then use a redundant router
as an AP, but that means crawling on hands and knees through a fiendishly
small roof space and passing the Ethernet plug/cable through holes which may
or may not be big enough in an internal breezeblock wall above the wall
between the utility room and kitchen. But that would mean two separate wifi
networks (router's and extension AP's) which isn't quite as seamless as
mesh.

 




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