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Are there 'home' wired APs available?



 
 
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  #31  
Old July 21st 19, 03:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Tobin
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Posts: 273
Default Are there 'home' wired APs available?

In article ,
Theo wrote:

I'd like (but it isn't vital) to have one
or two more RJ45s for local client devices.


They don't have that. Unmanaged switches are cheap though,
e.g. Netgear GS305 is 13.99 on Amazon.


The UAP-AC-Pro does.


So it does.

It might be useful if the AP is running off PoE and
there's no power in the vicinity (eg screwed to the ceiling). It also makes
it feasible to daisy chain APs.


It doesn't pass PoE on to the secondary port:

https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/artic...-Ports-on-UAPs

-- Richard
  #32  
Old July 21st 19, 05:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
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Posts: 33
Default Are there 'home' wired APs available?

"Tim+" wrote in message
...
I tried setting up two wired APs with the same SSID and key, although
they naturally had different MAC addresses. I found many devices which
had connected to one would not switch to the other when moving to a
different part of the house where the signal from the first was still
present but weak (and therefore slower).

I think this may well be the same whether the system is 'mesh' or not/



That's not my experience. With our old system, our wireless devices would
hang on like grime death to the first access point they picked up. With a
mesh system we always have good signal strength as it seem to migrate
between nodes without “hanging up” on the first one connected to.


It depends on phones as well as access points. My slightly older Samsung
Android phone would quite happily move between the router's wifi and the
extender's wifi (which had backhaul to the router through powerline) but my
wife's newer Android phone often stayed on the weaker network long after it
had become unusable and the other signal was stronger. Her iPad often had to
be signed in again when it moved networks because it claimed that the stored
password was incorrect. Sometimes the iPad and/or the access point had to be
rebooted to get it to connect.

Now we've got a Linksys Velop mesh system (and no router/extender wifi),
there are no problems moving around the house. I tested this by starting a
Youtube video playing and then walking all over the house, such that I was
definitely moving out of range of one node, and playback was glitch-free.

Setting up port-forwarding was an interesting exercise because you need to
do it twice: once on the original router and then again on the primary
Velop. But it now works perfectly.

  #33  
Old July 21st 19, 11:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Theo[_2_]
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Posts: 85
Default Are there 'home' wired APs available?

Chris Green wrote:
Yes, you're right. I've just realised that a Raspberry Pi with Wifi
(either a new Pi or an old one with a WiFi dongle) will do what I
want. I already use a Raspberry Pi for DNS so it can be a WiFi AP as
well. I have three (or maybe even four) Pis of various vintages
around the place so I can use the ones I have to try things out and,
if it works well, I can get a Pi 4 for an extra whizzy access point.


You /can/ do that, but the Pi only has a single wifi antenna (2.4GHz only
for the 3B, adds 5GHz for the 3B+ and 4). So I wouldn't expect performance
to be that good.

With a wifi dongle, unless you have a Pi 4 with a USB 3 dongle don't forget
you're still limited by USB 2 bandwidth.

For another example, I've recently installed OpenWRT on my spare UAP-AC-Pro
to use it as a wifi to LAN client bridge (something Ubiquiti don't support),
and it basically doesn't work (the DHCP problem mentioned):
https://openwrt.org/docs/guide-user/..._configuration

I'd get something designed to be an access point, you'll save yourself lots
of hassle.

Theo
  #34  
Old July 22nd 19, 08:45 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris Green
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Posts: 213
Default Are there 'home' wired APs available?

Theo wrote:
Chris Green wrote:
Yes, you're right. I've just realised that a Raspberry Pi with Wifi
(either a new Pi or an old one with a WiFi dongle) will do what I
want. I already use a Raspberry Pi for DNS so it can be a WiFi AP as
well. I have three (or maybe even four) Pis of various vintages
around the place so I can use the ones I have to try things out and,
if it works well, I can get a Pi 4 for an extra whizzy access point.


You /can/ do that, but the Pi only has a single wifi antenna (2.4GHz only
for the 3B, adds 5GHz for the 3B+ and 4). So I wouldn't expect performance
to be that good.

With a wifi dongle, unless you have a Pi 4 with a USB 3 dongle don't forget
you're still limited by USB 2 bandwidth.

For another example, I've recently installed OpenWRT on my spare UAP-AC-Pro
to use it as a wifi to LAN client bridge (something Ubiquiti don't support),
and it basically doesn't work (the DHCP problem mentioned):
https://openwrt.org/docs/guide-user/..._configuration

I'd get something designed to be an access point, you'll save yourself lots
of hassle.

It's a trade off between having full control of the WiFi parameters
(RPi) or hardware better designed for a WiFi AP. More expensive APs
do of course give more control but they are expensive, e.g. the better
Draytek ones are well over 100.

I have RPis lying around doing nothing so can experiment with them for
free. I also have a couple of wireless routers which I can probably
try with the WAN turned off. I already use an old Draytek 2820n this
way but I need more coverage - we have a big house and outbuildings.

--
Chris Green

  #35  
Old July 22nd 19, 04:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris Green
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Posts: 213
Default Are there 'home' wired APs available?

Chris Green wrote:
More expensive APs
do of course give more control but they are expensive, ....


Hmm, yes! :-)

--
Chris Green

 




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