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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Plusnet dodgy Internet



 
 
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  #41  
Old Today, 09:43 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 585
Default Plusnet dodgy Internet

On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:27:20 +0000, Brian Gregory
wrote:

On 15/01/2020 10:33, Roderick Stewart wrote:
They don't "wipe out radio reception". This nonsense is repeated so
frequently I can only assume it comes from people who never listen to
radio. Some radiation from these devices is certainly detectable, but
to say it wipes anything out is a gross exaggeration. I have to hold a
portable radio within a few inches of one of my powerline devices and
tune it to the blank space between channels to hear any noise from it
at all. The TV set seems to produce quite a lot more noise as it can
be detected from further away, perhaps as much as a couple of feet
away, and nobody worries about TV sets. Everywhere else in the house,
radio reception is perfectly fine, and I can hear no change to
anything if I switch the powerline devices off. Do some simple
experiments and you will hear the truth for yourself.


How much data were you transferring at the time though?

Yes newer units are better but the assumption that nobody around you is
interested in weaker radio signals that you on more unusual frequencies
than you ever listen to is wrong.

They can also make DSL modems sync at lower speeds.

They are basically a very stupid idea.


My VDSL modem has been synced to the internet service at the same
speed since quick check 05.11am, 60 days ago, so I wouldn't say it
had any signs of connection problems. My main computer is connected to
it via a couple of powerline devices, and whenever I'm downloading
something big, e.g. a Linux distribution, it does it at a rate very
close to the sync speed, so that seems to be in order also. I also
have a number of devices connected by wireless, and they show no signs
of problems either. Your mileage may vary, as they say, but the only
effect that I can detect at all is an increase in background noise on
a portable radio held close to one of the devices itself, and
elsewhere else everything just works. I draw my conclusions on the
basis of the evidence available to me, and that's what it is.

As far as I'm aware there aren't any radio hams with supersensitive
receivers anywhere nearby, and even if there were, they'd be grossly
outnumbered by ordinary householders using equipment they'd bought in
good faith to use with their computers, expecting to be allowed to do
so. No special provision is made for city-bound radio hams, any more
than it would be reasonable to expect everyone to put up blackout
curtains and drive around with shaded headlights as in World War 2 for
the sake of city-bound astronomers. You're perfectly entitled to think
powerline devices are a stupid idea, but the reality is that they're a
practical solution to a common problem and they almost certainly help
more than they hinder.

Rod.
  #42  
Old Today, 12:05 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ray[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Plusnet dodgy Internet

The author has marked this message not to be archived. This post will be deleted on January 27, 2020.

On 20 Jan 2020 at 08:43:38 GMT, "Roderick Stewart"
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:27:20 +0000, Brian Gregory
wrote:

On 15/01/2020 10:33, Roderick Stewart wrote:
They don't "wipe out radio reception". This nonsense is repeated so
frequently I can only assume it comes from people who never listen to
radio. Some radiation from these devices is certainly detectable, but
to say it wipes anything out is a gross exaggeration. I have to hold a
portable radio within a few inches of one of my powerline devices and
tune it to the blank space between channels to hear any noise from it
at all. The TV set seems to produce quite a lot more noise as it can
be detected from further away, perhaps as much as a couple of feet
away, and nobody worries about TV sets. Everywhere else in the house,
radio reception is perfectly fine, and I can hear no change to
anything if I switch the powerline devices off. Do some simple
experiments and you will hear the truth for yourself.


How much data were you transferring at the time though?

Yes newer units are better but the assumption that nobody around you is
interested in weaker radio signals that you on more unusual frequencies
than you ever listen to is wrong.

They can also make DSL modems sync at lower speeds.

They are basically a very stupid idea.


My VDSL modem has been synced to the internet service at the same
speed since quick check 05.11am, 60 days ago, so I wouldn't say it
had any signs of connection problems. My main computer is connected to
it via a couple of powerline devices, and whenever I'm downloading
something big, e.g. a Linux distribution, it does it at a rate very
close to the sync speed, so that seems to be in order also. I also
have a number of devices connected by wireless, and they show no signs
of problems either. Your mileage may vary, as they say, but the only
effect that I can detect at all is an increase in background noise on
a portable radio held close to one of the devices itself, and
elsewhere else everything just works. I draw my conclusions on the
basis of the evidence available to me, and that's what it is.

As far as I'm aware there aren't any radio hams with supersensitive
receivers anywhere nearby, and even if there were, they'd be grossly
outnumbered by ordinary householders using equipment they'd bought in
good faith to use with their computers, expecting to be allowed to do
so. No special provision is made for city-bound radio hams, any more
than it would be reasonable to expect everyone to put up blackout
curtains and drive around with shaded headlights as in World War 2 for
the sake of city-bound astronomers. You're perfectly entitled to think
powerline devices are a stupid idea, but the reality is that they're a
practical solution to a common problem and they almost certainly help
more than they hinder.

Rod.


What he said ^
I've been using Devolo power line devices for a number of years without issue
or interference to any receivers, radio or TV, in the house. The one right
next the router isn't causing any connection problems, and sync speed is spot
on what the ISP predicts.
Old or dodgy ring mains, wiring and consumer units could however be an issue.


--
There are enough diamonds in existence to give everyone on the planet a cupful.
So where are mine?
  #43  
Old Today, 01:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Brian Gregory[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Plusnet dodgy Internet

On 20/01/2020 11:05, Ray wrote:
On 20 Jan 2020 at 08:43:38 GMT, "Roderick Stewart"
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:27:20 +0000, Brian Gregory
wrote:

On 15/01/2020 10:33, Roderick Stewart wrote:
They don't "wipe out radio reception". This nonsense is repeated so
frequently I can only assume it comes from people who never listen to
radio. Some radiation from these devices is certainly detectable, but
to say it wipes anything out is a gross exaggeration. I have to hold a
portable radio within a few inches of one of my powerline devices and
tune it to the blank space between channels to hear any noise from it
at all. The TV set seems to produce quite a lot more noise as it can
be detected from further away, perhaps as much as a couple of feet
away, and nobody worries about TV sets. Everywhere else in the house,
radio reception is perfectly fine, and I can hear no change to
anything if I switch the powerline devices off. Do some simple
experiments and you will hear the truth for yourself.

How much data were you transferring at the time though?

Yes newer units are better but the assumption that nobody around you is
interested in weaker radio signals that you on more unusual frequencies
than you ever listen to is wrong.

They can also make DSL modems sync at lower speeds.

They are basically a very stupid idea.


My VDSL modem has been synced to the internet service at the same
speed since quick check 05.11am, 60 days ago, so I wouldn't say it
had any signs of connection problems. My main computer is connected to
it via a couple of powerline devices, and whenever I'm downloading
something big, e.g. a Linux distribution, it does it at a rate very
close to the sync speed, so that seems to be in order also. I also
have a number of devices connected by wireless, and they show no signs
of problems either. Your mileage may vary, as they say, but the only
effect that I can detect at all is an increase in background noise on
a portable radio held close to one of the devices itself, and
elsewhere else everything just works. I draw my conclusions on the
basis of the evidence available to me, and that's what it is.

As far as I'm aware there aren't any radio hams with supersensitive
receivers anywhere nearby, and even if there were, they'd be grossly
outnumbered by ordinary householders using equipment they'd bought in
good faith to use with their computers, expecting to be allowed to do
so. No special provision is made for city-bound radio hams, any more
than it would be reasonable to expect everyone to put up blackout
curtains and drive around with shaded headlights as in World War 2 for
the sake of city-bound astronomers. You're perfectly entitled to think
powerline devices are a stupid idea, but the reality is that they're a
practical solution to a common problem and they almost certainly help
more than they hinder.

Rod.


What he said ^
I've been using Devolo power line devices for a number of years without issue
or interference to any receivers, radio or TV, in the house. The one right
next the router isn't causing any connection problems, and sync speed is spot
on what the ISP predicts.
Old or dodgy ring mains, wiring and consumer units could however be an issue.



How can blasting wideband RF down unshielded unbalanced cables that have
other devices that are effectively short circuits across them at random
intervals (yes many devices have capacitors across their mains inputs)
and increasing the power until it gets through possibly be regarded as a
good idea?

--

Brian Gregory (in England).
  #44  
Old Today, 02:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Brian Gregory[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Plusnet dodgy Internet

On 20/01/2020 11:05, Ray wrote:
On 20 Jan 2020 at 08:43:38 GMT, "Roderick Stewart"
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 22:27:20 +0000, Brian Gregory
wrote:

On 15/01/2020 10:33, Roderick Stewart wrote:
They don't "wipe out radio reception". This nonsense is repeated so
frequently I can only assume it comes from people who never listen to
radio. Some radiation from these devices is certainly detectable, but
to say it wipes anything out is a gross exaggeration. I have to hold a
portable radio within a few inches of one of my powerline devices and
tune it to the blank space between channels to hear any noise from it
at all. The TV set seems to produce quite a lot more noise as it can
be detected from further away, perhaps as much as a couple of feet
away, and nobody worries about TV sets. Everywhere else in the house,
radio reception is perfectly fine, and I can hear no change to
anything if I switch the powerline devices off. Do some simple
experiments and you will hear the truth for yourself.

How much data were you transferring at the time though?

Yes newer units are better but the assumption that nobody around you is
interested in weaker radio signals that you on more unusual frequencies
than you ever listen to is wrong.

They can also make DSL modems sync at lower speeds.

They are basically a very stupid idea.


My VDSL modem has been synced to the internet service at the same
speed since quick check 05.11am, 60 days ago, so I wouldn't say it
had any signs of connection problems. My main computer is connected to
it via a couple of powerline devices, and whenever I'm downloading
something big, e.g. a Linux distribution, it does it at a rate very
close to the sync speed, so that seems to be in order also. I also
have a number of devices connected by wireless, and they show no signs
of problems either. Your mileage may vary, as they say, but the only
effect that I can detect at all is an increase in background noise on
a portable radio held close to one of the devices itself, and
elsewhere else everything just works. I draw my conclusions on the
basis of the evidence available to me, and that's what it is.

As far as I'm aware there aren't any radio hams with supersensitive
receivers anywhere nearby, and even if there were, they'd be grossly
outnumbered by ordinary householders using equipment they'd bought in
good faith to use with their computers, expecting to be allowed to do
so. No special provision is made for city-bound radio hams, any more
than it would be reasonable to expect everyone to put up blackout
curtains and drive around with shaded headlights as in World War 2 for
the sake of city-bound astronomers. You're perfectly entitled to think
powerline devices are a stupid idea, but the reality is that they're a
practical solution to a common problem and they almost certainly help
more than they hinder.

Rod.


What he said ^
I've been using Devolo power line devices for a number of years without issue
or interference to any receivers, radio or TV, in the house. The one right
next the router isn't causing any connection problems, and sync speed is spot
on what the ISP predicts.
Old or dodgy ring mains, wiring and consumer units could however be an issue.



http://www.emcia.org/documents/pltreport.pdf

--

Brian Gregory (in England).
  #45  
Old Today, 02:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 585
Default Plusnet dodgy Internet

On Mon, 20 Jan 2020 12:51:06 +0000, Brian Gregory
wrote:

[...]
What he said ^
I've been using Devolo power line devices for a number of years without issue
or interference to any receivers, radio or TV, in the house. The one right
next the router isn't causing any connection problems, and sync speed is spot
on what the ISP predicts.
Old or dodgy ring mains, wiring and consumer units could however be an issue.



How can blasting wideband RF down unshielded unbalanced cables that have
other devices that are effectively short circuits across them at random
intervals (yes many devices have capacitors across their mains inputs)
and increasing the power until it gets through possibly be regarded as a
good idea?


It all depends on how you describe it.

Using a clever electronic solution to make use of cabling that already
exists instead of all the disruption of ripping up floorboards etc to
install new ones actually does seem like a good idea.

I've seen nothing to suggest that "blasting" is a fair description of
what it does with the RF signal, as it just seems to do its job
without any detriment to anything else. I'll readily acknowledge that
my situation won't necessarily be representative of all, but if there
are any radio hams nearby who are troubled by any rogue RF from my
house, they've not made their concerns known to me, and I've been
using powerline devices for at least a decade.

Rod.
 



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