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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

Building a SIP spam rejecter



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 28th 19, 11:54 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip,
Andrew Benham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 302
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 25/09/2019 18:20, Graham. wrote:
Thanks for the heads-up about 020 4, that's news to me.

Installing vanilla Asterisk and manipulating the dial plan etc in a
terminal session is not my idea of fun. If the addige "GUIs are for
WIMPs" is true, then I'm a WIMP!

Getting rid of the Stretch GUI and working the Pi headless, makes a
lot of sense though.

I would reccomend the RASPBX image.


Being a Raspberry Pi newbie, I had to be reminded that I can use
different SD cards with it...
So I've bought another SD card and put raspbx on it. The web interface
made my head explode, but I guess I just need a quick start guide and
do one step at a time.

  #12  
Old September 28th 19, 02:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 340
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 25/09/2019 18:20, Graham. wrote:
Thanks for the heads-up about 020 4, that's news to me.

Installing vanilla Asterisk and manipulating the dial plan etc in a
terminal session is not my idea of fun. If the addige "GUIs are for
WIMPs" is true, then I'm a WIMP!

Getting rid of the Stretch GUI and working the Pi headless, makes a
lot of sense though.

I would reccomend the RASPBX image.


Being a Raspberry Pi newbie, I had to be reminded that I can use
different SD cards with it...
So I've bought another SD card and put raspbx on it. The web interface
made my head explode, but I guess I just need a quick start guide and
do one step at a time.


My RASPBX Pi just uses the SD card to do a minimal boot-up then hands
everything over to a 2.5 inch 160GB spinning-rust drive salviged from
a redundent laptop.

Of course if this is a physical land-line rather than a virtual line
that you want to intercept the spammers, you are going to need some
additional hardware, I use a Linksys SPA3000.

One of the coolest things I use my system for is to make virtually
free calls from my mobile, this is achieved by triggering a callback
from the Pi and giving me a DISA dialtone.

And the ability to record calls has proved very worthwhile in a number
of cases, sometimes many months after the call.




--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #13  
Old September 28th 19, 04:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
David Woolley
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Posts: 113
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 28/09/2019 13:39, Graham. wrote:
a 2.5 inch 160GB spinning-rust drive


I doubt such exists. All the drives I've opened up have metallic
surfaces to the platters, which seem to be of glass. They're really
quite good mirrors.
  #14  
Old September 28th 19, 07:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bob Eager[_5_]
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Posts: 70
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 15:51:11 +0100, David Woolley wrote:

On 28/09/2019 13:39, Graham. wrote:
a 2.5 inch 160GB spinning-rust drive


I doubt such exists. All the drives I've opened up have metallic
surfaces to the platters, which seem to be of glass. They're really
quite good mirrors.


And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?
  #15  
Old September 28th 19, 10:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
David Woolley
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Posts: 113
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?


Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron nor
oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-platters.html
  #16  
Old September 30th 19, 02:47 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 340
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?


Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron nor
oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-platters.html


I was using figurative language to deride what will no doubt soon me
obsolete technology, I hope we all realised that, but what part of
figurative language was it, I'm not sure myself, a hyperbolic
metaphor? Does such a construct even exist?


--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #17  
Old September 30th 19, 10:56 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Vir Campestris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 30/09/2019 13:47, Graham. wrote:
On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?


Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron nor
oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-platters.html


I was using figurative language to deride what will no doubt soon me
obsolete technology, I hope we all realised that, but what part of
figurative language was it, I'm not sure myself, a hyperbolic
metaphor? Does such a construct even exist?


I think the early discs may have been iron oxide; certainly they were
the right colour, which they aren't any more.

Not that I see many platters these days!

Andy
  #18  
Old October 1st 19, 12:55 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 340
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 30/09/2019 13:47, Graham. wrote:
On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?

Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron nor
oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-platters.html


I was using figurative language to deride what will no doubt soon me
obsolete technology, I hope we all realised that, but what part of
figurative language was it, I'm not sure myself, a hyperbolic
metaphor? Does such a construct even exist?


I think the early discs may have been iron oxide; certainly they were
the right colour, which they aren't any more.

Not that I see many platters these days!

Andy


That would be spinning shellac.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHI0hwoIBvM

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #19  
Old October 4th 19, 10:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Vir Campestris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On 30/09/2019 23:55, Graham. wrote:
On 30/09/2019 13:47, Graham. wrote:
On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?

Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron nor
oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-platters.html

I was using figurative language to deride what will no doubt soon me
obsolete technology, I hope we all realised that, but what part of
figurative language was it, I'm not sure myself, a hyperbolic
metaphor? Does such a construct even exist?


I think the early discs may have been iron oxide; certainly they were
the right colour, which they aren't any more.

Not that I see many platters these days!

Andy


That would be spinning shellac.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHI0hwoIBvM

No, it would have been an ICL EDS200.

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/d...200-Disk-Pack/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mup26/21063136574

Andy
  #20  
Old October 4th 19, 10:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bob Eager[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Building a SIP spam rejecter

On Fri, 04 Oct 2019 21:22:55 +0100, Vir Campestris wrote:

On 30/09/2019 23:55, Graham. wrote:
On 30/09/2019 13:47, Graham. wrote:
On 28/09/2019 18:44, Bob Eager wrote:
And the metallic surfaces are ... rust?

Rust is iron oxide (hydrated ferric oxide). There is neither iron
nor oxygen in the platter coating. Typical active layers are
Cobalt-Chromium-Tantalum, Cobalt-Platinum-Chromium, or
Cobalt-Platinum-Nickel alloys.

See
https://www.mjm.co.uk/hard-disk-disassembly/hard-disk-

platters.html

I was using figurative language to deride what will no doubt soon me
obsolete technology, I hope we all realised that, but what part of
figurative language was it, I'm not sure myself, a hyperbolic
metaphor? Does such a construct even exist?


I think the early discs may have been iron oxide; certainly they were
the right colour, which they aren't any more.

Not that I see many platters these days!

Andy


That would be spinning shellac.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHI0hwoIBvM

No, it would have been an ICL EDS200.

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/d...200-Disk-Pack/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mup26/21063136574


I managed a system with a load of those and the ancient ex 1900 disk
controller they used. Luckily not with an ICL operating system...the
interesting thing about them was that each track could be formatted with
a different sector size, although we didn't bother.

But before that we had the Elliott 4130 with the 1MB drives (EDS1
anbone?) which we later upgraded to 2MB. And yes, they were multi platter.
 




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