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Weak wfi signal



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 18th 20, 10:44 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tim+[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 169
Default Weak wfi signal

Bob Henson wrote:
Jeff Gaines wrote:

On 17/02/2020 in message Andy Burns
wrote:


NY wrote:

The phone will connect if it is about a yard from the router but
loses the connection when it is moved further away. The wifi analyzer
app tells me that the signal strength is -75dBm

At that sort of distance my phone has the needle rammed hard into the
-40dBm stop at the green end of the scale ...


I have never been able to understand why it's "-" 40 dBm. Is there an
idiot's guide to how signal strength is measured?



The replies to your message, whilst informative and I'm sure correct
(thanks, chaps!), conclusively prove to this layman that it's one of the
daftest systems of measurement since Avoirdupois weights and the old
British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Nothing daft about pounds, shillings and pence! Did wonders for the
numeracy of our generation. ;-)



I assume it's an attempt to represent an inverse square law in a linear
manner, but I'm no mathematician and/or physicist, so that probably proves
my ignorance totally. In the unlikely event that I am correct, then I stand
by my former incredulity.


Agree with you about he rest though.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #12  
Old February 18th 20, 11:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David Rance[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36
Default Weak wfi signal

On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:22:00 Paul Cummins wrote:

In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


You have made it more complicated than necessary!!

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK
  #13  
Old February 18th 20, 12:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 78
Default Weak wfi signal

"David Rance" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:22:00 Paul Cummins wrote:

In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


You have made it more complicated than necessary!!


No, our ancestors made £sd more complicated than it needed to be by choosing
*multiple* bases: 12 and 20, and shunning the one base that makes sense: 10
(given that we have 10 fingers incl thumbs).

OK, so we also invented nicknames for some coins (tanner, bob, florin,
crown) but that's just an added thing that a foreigner has to learn about
our system. Interesting that no-one's invented names for any of the decimal
coins - or at least, not ones that are universally understood in common
parlance.

The past has a lot to be proud and nostalgic about, but the imperial system
and the £sd monetary system are things about which we should hang our heads
in shame. *Any* system which isn't based on the base in which we count (10)
is fatally flawed.

OK, you've got the base 2 and base 16 notations used in computing, but at
least that is a specialised field, and at least it uses additional symbols
(letters A-F) to denote values which require two decimal digits to express.

  #14  
Old February 18th 20, 12:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Henson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default Weak wfi signal

David Rance wrote:

On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:22:00 Paul Cummins wrote:

In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


You have made it more complicated than necessary!!

David


Not a lot, though. We were indescribably happy in retail business the day
we got decimalised coinage. Gentlemen's trouser pockets lasted 10 times as
long when we got rid of the old "copper" coins too - albeit the "keep fit"
benefits of carrying that amount of weight around was lost. The old penny
was around the size of Don Quixote's shield :-) (Old Fidonet Joke!)


--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

I thought I was getting more patient with advancing years - turns out I
just don't give a damn.
  #15  
Old February 18th 20, 12:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Tobin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 292
Default Weak wfi signal

In article . uk,
Paul Cummins wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.


The two-shillling florin is not traditional British money. It was
introduced as the first step to decimalization in 1849.

One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


-- Richard
  #17  
Old February 18th 20, 01:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
PeeGee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 312
Default Weak wfi signal

On 18/02/2020 12:12, NY wrote:
"David Rance" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:22:00 Paul Cummins wrote:

In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.

Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


You have made it more complicated than necessary!!


No, our ancestors made £sd more complicated than it needed to be by
choosing *multiple* bases: 12 and 20, and shunning the one base that
makes sense: 10 (given that we have 10 fingers incl thumbs).

OK, so we also invented nicknames for some coins (tanner, bob, florin,
crown) but that's just an added thing that a foreigner has to learn
about our system. Interesting that no-one's invented names for any of
the decimal coins - or at least, not ones that are universally
understood in common parlance.

The past has a lot to be proud and nostalgic about, but the imperial
system and the £sd monetary system are things about which we should hang
our heads in shame. *Any* system which isn't based on the base in which
we count (10) is fatally flawed.

OK, you've got the base 2 and base 16 notations used in computing, but
at least that is a specialised field, and at least it uses additional
symbols (letters A-F) to denote values which require two decimal digits
to express.


It was far more flexible than decimal coinage:

100 is divisible by 2, 4, 10, 25 and 50: 240 is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5,
8, 10, 12, 15, 16 (and the results of those divisions) plus the
divisions giving farthings and ha'pennies!

--
PeeGee

"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
  #18  
Old February 18th 20, 01:52 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 78
Default Weak wfi signal

"PeeGee" wrote in message
o.uk...

The past has a lot to be proud and nostalgic about, but the imperial
system and the £sd monetary system are things about which we should hang
our heads in shame. *Any* system which isn't based on the base in which
we count (10) is fatally flawed.

OK, you've got the base 2 and base 16 notations used in computing, but at
least that is a specialised field, and at least it uses additional
symbols (letters A-F) to denote values which require two decimal digits
to express.


It was far more flexible than decimal coinage:

100 is divisible by 2, 4, 10, 25 and 50: 240 is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5,
8, 10, 12, 15, 16 (and the results of those divisions) plus the divisions
giving farthings and ha'pennies!


It depends whether those extra factors are useful to shopkeepers. You'd tend
to start with an item price of 1, 2, 3, ..., etc pence (old or new) and
multiply by the number of items bought. Divisibility by 3, 4, 8, 12, 15, 16
is only useful if you work backwards, starting with a multi-item price of
(for example) £1, and want integer prices in (old) pence for one unit.


Bases 9, 12 and 16 do have their uses for packaging items, because they lead
to square or almost-square packages (3x3, 4x3 or 4x4 cans of backed beans in
a box) , whereas a pack of 10 will tend to be long and thin (5x2 tins of
baked beans in a box).


It would have been (bean?!) so much easier if we'd adopted base 12 rather
than 10 as our basic counting base (together with new digits for 10 and 11
in base 10), then we'd have had the advantage of sqaure(ish) packaging and
yet simple calculations. But a mixture of base 10 for counting and base 8,
12, 14, 16 (anything *except* base 10) for measurement units is a recipe for
over-complicated calculations.

I have great difficulty doing metal arithmetic at the best of times (I need
a pen and paper so I can keep track of all the carry/borrow digits), but the
thought of doing it on mixed base 12/20 for £sd calculations would be sheer
mental torture.

  #19  
Old February 18th 20, 02:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ian Jackson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Weak wfi signal

In message . uk, Paul
Cummins writes
In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.


You omitted to say that a sixpenny coin was also known as a 'Tanner',
and Half a Crown was sometimes called 'Half a Dollar' (on the basis
that, at one time, (Spanish) dollars were worth around five bob). Also,
some called a 'Thrupenny (Threpenny) Bit' a 'Threpenny Diddler'. And, of
course, a pound is still a 'Quid'.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


Given 24 hours, I could still revert to LSD.
--

  #20  
Old February 18th 20, 02:58 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
bert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Weak wfi signal

In article , David Rance
writes
On Tue, 18 Feb 2020 11:22:00 Paul Cummins wrote:

In article ,
(Bob Henson) wrote:

British coinage system of pounds, shillings and pence.


Simple system to understand.

Two farthings = One Ha'penny.
Two ha'pennies = One Penny.
Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit.
Two Thrupences = A Sixpence.
Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob.
Two Bob = A Florin.
One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown.
Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note.
Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies, or 20 shillings).
One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they
thought it was too complicated.


You have made it more complicated than necessary!!

David

No he missed out the crown.
--
bert
 




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