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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Broadband not collapsing



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 26th 20, 09:09 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
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Posts: 609
Default Broadband not collapsing

On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 11:00:34 +0000, Graham J
wrote:

OFCOM have asked people to use landline telephone where available rather
than mobile phones and to download films at quiet periods rather than
streaming them.


Could we get the BBC to have a blanket ban on broadcast interviews by
mobile phone? The quality is so bad as to often be unintelligible.
They should only use a landine for broadcast material.


Normally I'd agree, but in the present circumstances it's
understandable if phone video is all they can get. If the content is
sufficiently important and/or interesting, the technical quality
becomes less important.

Rod.
  #12  
Old March 26th 20, 10:47 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris
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Posts: 636
Default Broadband not collapsing

On 25/03/2020 20:24, Graham J wrote:
MissRiaElaine wrote:

[snip]

Could we get the BBC to have a blanket ban on broadcast interviews by
mobile phone?* The quality is so bad as to often be unintelligible.
They should only use a landine for broadcast material.


This has been mentioned before. It's a bit difficult to use a landline
when you're out and not near one. It's not always possible.


But there's no need to broadcast the horrible result - the interview (or
whatever) can be re-voiced or simply read out.


In an ideal world, probably. We are currently not in an ideal world...
  #13  
Old March 26th 20, 10:59 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
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Posts: 78
Default Broadband not collapsing

"Graham J" wrote in message
...
MissRiaElaine wrote:

[snip]

Could we get the BBC to have a blanket ban on broadcast interviews by
mobile phone? The quality is so bad as to often be unintelligible. They
should only use a landine for broadcast material.


This has been mentioned before. It's a bit difficult to use a landline
when you're out and not near one. It's not always possible.


But there's no need to broadcast the horrible result - the interview (or
whatever) can be re-voiced or simply read out.


I think it is a lot better to hear the interviewee's voice, with his
intonation, his hesitations, his pauses while he thinks of an answer - you
lose all that extra information if the interview is "re-voiced" by an actor,
as they used to do with statements by Gerry Adams and other Sinn Fein
spokesmen.

Probably best if the interview is done in a reasonably quiet place and while
stationary, to avoid background noise and changes in signal reception
conditions.


I was intrigued by the recommendation in a recent article on the BBC News
site that you should use a landline rather than mobile if you had the
choice. The quality of mobile calls makes that blindingly obvious - but
maybe not to a millennial who has grown up with mobiles and very rarely uses
a landline. Likewise for the recommendation to use Ethernet rather than wifi
if you have the choice. I must admit I've never found that a microwave
degrades the data transfer rate of wifi - I did some tests with my laptop
close to the microwave and the router in another room. I set a big file copy
going, and looked at the transfer rate in Task Manager as I turned on the
microwave. There was no wiggle on the graph.

  #14  
Old March 26th 20, 12:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 680
Default Broadband not collapsing

On Monday, 23 March 2020 11:54:19 UTC, Chris wrote:
Mostly people complain when things go wrong so I just wanted to say that
I'm pleasantly surprised that, on the whole, our broadband
infrastructure has coped well with a sudden upswing in demand during the
day with everyone WFH.

I've been doing a lot of video calls, remote desktopping to work, etc
and it's been the end-point services suffering rather than the connections.

A big thumbs-up here!

Obviously, this'll be a kiss of death and I'll be without BB for the
next week )


It should be able to cope, after all it can manage millions tuning, sorry connecting, into sporting events and the like.

Netflix, Amazon and maybe Facebook have all announced reduced bandwidth to "spare the net congestion". The reality is that their own connection to the web is too low capacity and they need to reduce bandwidth per connection to serve increased demand.
  #15  
Old March 26th 20, 12:28 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tweed[_3_]
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Posts: 3
Default Broadband not collapsing

R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Monday, 23 March 2020 11:54:19 UTC, Chris wrote:
Mostly people complain when things go wrong so I just wanted to say that
I'm pleasantly surprised that, on the whole, our broadband
infrastructure has coped well with a sudden upswing in demand during the
day with everyone WFH.

I've been doing a lot of video calls, remote desktopping to work, etc
and it's been the end-point services suffering rather than the connections.

A big thumbs-up here!

Obviously, this'll be a kiss of death and I'll be without BB for the
next week )


It should be able to cope, after all it can manage millions tuning, sorry
connecting, into sporting events and the like.

Netflix, Amazon and maybe Facebook have all announced reduced bandwidth
to "spare the net congestion". The reality is that their own connection
to the web is too low capacity and they need to reduce bandwidth per
connection to serve increased demand.


I very much doubt that “their connection to the web” is inadequate. These
days all their content is pushed out to local storage at the network edges
(content distribution networks).

  #16  
Old March 26th 20, 02:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 636
Default Broadband not collapsing

On 25/03/2020 10:53, Recliner wrote:
Graham J wrote:
Roderick Stewart wrote:

[snip]


Following up my own post, I've just had an email from Zen saying
they've noticed an increase in usage of about 18%, and they say this
is well within their capacity.

So that's one thing at least that isn't all doom and gloom.


The usual limit on capacity is the backhaul from your local exchange to
the internet generally. This is most obvious for consumer grade ISPs
who don't buy enough capacity and congestion occurs at busy tomes of day
- typically 4 - 8pm when the schoolkids arrive home.

Given that they are now home all day I guess the load is spread more evenly.


I'm still getting a rock solid performance from Hyperoptic — here's a
typical test I just did, over WiFi, through a wall, to my iPad (it's
obviously better using a wired connection):
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49696391268_eb2202a0f7_o_d.jpg

Day or night, the performance never varies.


Similar here. Not seeing any noticeable degradation in performance with
my plusnet fibre.

  #17  
Old March 31st 20, 03:07 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 282
Default Broadband not collapsing

On 25/03/2020 18:25, MissRiaElaine wrote:
This has been mentioned before. It's a bit difficult to use a landline
when you're out and not near one. It's not always possible.


But much of the time they are in their home or office.

Unfortunately people have just grown to accept telephone calls dropping
out because of reliance on mobile phones.

 




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