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Outdoor WiFi link - cheapest way to do 30 metres or so



 
 
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  #61  
Old May 3rd 20, 06:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 692
Default Outdoor WiFi link - cheapest way to do 30 metres or so

On Saturday, 2 May 2020 21:31:16 UTC+1, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 29/04/2020 13:25, Invalid wrote:
If the pipe was black and corrugated, it was probably perforated land
drainage pipe. Designed so that the water in the surrounding subsoil
drains into the pipe and away.

In that case the gravel is essentially the way the water gets into the
pipe, and as in a soakaway, provides plenty of space for the water while
preventing the surrounding soil from blocking the drainage holes.


It's brown, not corrugated, and is to act as the rainwater drainage for
a new housing development.

Luckily the same guy owns the field and the building site. Or he'd have
had trouble. There's been a foot of water on site most of the winter - I
did warn him it had an old pond... the top few metres of the ground are
heavy clay.

The gravel may have been for conforming, as suggested upthread.

Andy


Pale brown means it is a soil pipe and will presumably be connected to mains drainage.

The gravel is to allow the fall to be adjusted and so that stones in the earth do not damage the pipe,

Pipes under roads have their trenches refilled with aggregate.
  #62  
Old May 3rd 20, 09:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Vir Campestris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 278
Default Outdoor WiFi link - cheapest way to do 30 metres or so

On 03/05/2020 18:38, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Saturday, 2 May 2020 21:31:16 UTC+1, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 29/04/2020 13:25, Invalid wrote:
If the pipe was black and corrugated, it was probably perforated land
drainage pipe. Designed so that the water in the surrounding subsoil
drains into the pipe and away.

In that case the gravel is essentially the way the water gets into the
pipe, and as in a soakaway, provides plenty of space for the water while
preventing the surrounding soil from blocking the drainage holes.


It's brown, not corrugated, and is to act as the rainwater drainage for
a new housing development.

Luckily the same guy owns the field and the building site. Or he'd have
had trouble. There's been a foot of water on site most of the winter - I
did warn him it had an old pond... the top few metres of the ground are
heavy clay.

The gravel may have been for conforming, as suggested upthread.

Andy


Pale brown means it is a soil pipe and will presumably be connected to mains drainage.

The gravel is to allow the fall to be adjusted and so that stones in the earth do not damage the pipe,

Pipes under roads have their trenches refilled with aggregate.

It is definitely rainwater and not a soil pipe. The downhill end opens
into an existing ditch. I've also read the planning documents; we have
mains drainage here, but he is not permitted to put rainwater drainage
into it.

What colour would you expect for a rainwater drain?

There are flints in the clay. You may well be right that this is why
there is gravel.

Andy
  #63  
Old May 4th 20, 09:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
grinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 99
Default Outdoor WiFi link - cheapest way to do 30 metres or so OT

Just a thought here. I used to work on the comms side for a well know
electricity board . They use black corrugated ducting for LV mains
supply cables(240/415V). It seems to be the industry norm so be careful
when cutting ducting.
  #64  
Old May 4th 20, 12:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 692
Default Outdoor WiFi link - cheapest way to do 30 metres or so

On Sunday, 3 May 2020 21:51:04 UTC+1, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 03/05/2020 18:38, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Saturday, 2 May 2020 21:31:16 UTC+1, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 29/04/2020 13:25, Invalid wrote:
If the pipe was black and corrugated, it was probably perforated land
drainage pipe. Designed so that the water in the surrounding subsoil
drains into the pipe and away.

In that case the gravel is essentially the way the water gets into the
pipe, and as in a soakaway, provides plenty of space for the water while
preventing the surrounding soil from blocking the drainage holes.

It's brown, not corrugated, and is to act as the rainwater drainage for
a new housing development.

Luckily the same guy owns the field and the building site. Or he'd have
had trouble. There's been a foot of water on site most of the winter - I
did warn him it had an old pond... the top few metres of the ground are
heavy clay.

The gravel may have been for conforming, as suggested upthread.

Andy


Pale brown means it is a soil pipe and will presumably be connected to mains drainage.

The gravel is to allow the fall to be adjusted and so that stones in the earth do not damage the pipe,

Pipes under roads have their trenches refilled with aggregate.

It is definitely rainwater and not a soil pipe. The downhill end opens
into an existing ditch. I've also read the planning documents; we have
mains drainage here, but he is not permitted to put rainwater drainage
into it.

What colour would you expect for a rainwater drain?

There are flints in the clay. You may well be right that this is why
there is gravel.

Andy


Black Domestic mains electric cable, low voltage
Red High voltage electric cable
Yellow Service and mains gas cable (ducting is perforated to allow for gas venting)
Blue Water pipes installed at least 750mm below surface
Green Broadband, telephone and non-motorway CCTV cables
Grey BT or telecommunications cables
Purple Motorway service cables for speed cameras, traffic cameras, emergency phones etc
Orange Street lighting and traffic signaling cables (i.e. traffic lights)
Pink - Temporary survey markings, unknown/unidentified facilities.
White - Proposed excavation limits or route.

and
plastic sewer pipes are pale brown / terra cotta
land drainage pipes are generally black

Plastic soil pipes (above ground) come in white, black, brown and grey.


 




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