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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Powerline brands to avoid?



 
 
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  #41  
Old May 15th 20, 02:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
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Posts: 244
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

On 14/05/2020 16:14, David Rance wrote:
On Thu, 14 May 2020 14:47:22 Martin Brown wrote:

On 14/05/2020 14:28, Chris wrote:
*My daughter is being moved to WFH with a work supplied PC in two
days.* Her room is a fair distance from the router meaning that wifi
may not be* reliable enough - although she streams films all the
time. So am considering powerline rather than run ethernet cables
through the house* and down a floor.
*Given the short notice I don't have time to consider what is best,
only what to avoid. So are there any brands to definitely avoid?
*Argos are local and have TP-Link pass-through ones in stock.
Reasonable?
https://www.argos.co.uk/product/9156900


They look like a newer 600Mbps version of the 300M ones I have had for
ages.

Never had any bother with them. Basically plug and play wired
equivalent but without having to run any physical wire. Mine actually
works at a reduced speed across two independent ring mains of
different distribution boards one for the extension and one for the
main house. I didn't really expect it to work that well but was
pleasantly surprised.


That answers a question I was going to ask. I have exactly the same
situation with a granny annex with its own distribution board.


It is pot luck whether or not it works over two different sets of mains
wiring. I didn't really expect it to work but tried it anyway and was
pleasantly surprised. Initially I was just hoping to access a network
printer but to my astonishment there was more than enough bandwidth for
browsing too. It managed around 40-50Mbps so 10x the ADSL speed.

So how far does the signal go through the power cables. Does it go
beyond the incoming mains cable to the house. If not, what stops it?


The self inductance of a long length of wire and the metering coils.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #42  
Old May 15th 20, 03:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris
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Posts: 653
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

On 14/05/2020 17:40, Woody wrote:
I had needed to get broadband down to my shed so I got a pair of the TPL
4010 non-plugthrough units - 24.99 I think from Expensive World. I put
one on my downstairs ring right next to the router and the other in the
shed.

To get from source to end the signal has to pass through the downstairs
ring to the power box, through the power box to the meter common point,
out to second power box, through about 3m of power cable into a 1.5mm
SWA* cable to the shed, through the shed power box and out over about 4m
of power cable to the destination socket. When I tested it my incoming
was around 56Mb/s and it was coming out at the other end at 37Mb/s which
I consider to be quite good, certainly fast enough for any domestic
needs. [*SWA = steel wire armoured]

My house has older wiring where I have a Wylex box with MCBs of the
house rings, a MEM fuse box for the immersion heater (which we rarely
use having an Aga for hot water) and which now feeds the shed, and a box
with 2xMCB and an RCD in the shed.

As was said by someone else you MUST plug the units directly into wall
sockets. If you use a multiblock extension lead your speed will drop
like a stone - indeed if they will work at all!


I tried something similar over lunch. Our garage is a separated from the
house and the wifi doesn't reach so my phone reverts to 4G. It is on a
separate ring with its own fuse box - both it and the main house were
renewed 5 years ago.

Plugged in the TP-link in the garage and only got about a 3-4Mbps drop
in speed. My desktop wired directly to the router gets B/band speed of
~31-32Mbps (on a 40Mbps connection). Upstairs in the house the powerline
was more or less the same speed. In the garage via two distribution
boxes it was ~28Mbps. Pleasantly surprised

Looks like I might get another wifi one for the garage in the
not-too-distant future
  #43  
Old May 15th 20, 09:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 278
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

On 15/05/2020 11:10, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Thu, 14 May 2020 21:22:45 +0100, Vir Campestris
wrote:

So how far does the signal go through the power cables. Does it go
beyond the incoming mains cable to the house. If not, what stops it?


One of my colleagues in a shared house just tracked down his slow
network to the way his powerline had paired to one in the house next door...


That's why they have serial numbers and why Netgear provide a software
application to assign encryption keys to them, just like wi-fi.

Of course, you've got to take the trouble to set them up properly....

It surprised me too. I know he's only junior, but he is a Cambridge
graduate in CompSci.

Andy
  #44  
Old May 16th 20, 11:05 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
tim...
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Posts: 163
Default Powerline brands to avoid?



"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Graham J wrote:
confusing way, e.g. the American "up = on" convention for power switches.


You mean the everywhere else in the world (and here on non-domestic
equipment, and here on consumer units) standard convention for switches.
:-)


Italian light switches are upside down

(there're also outside the room - though not a hotel room, obviously)

tim



  #45  
Old May 18th 20, 09:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
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Posts: 244
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

On 16/05/2020 13:22, Peter wrote:

Chris wrote


My daughter is being moved to WFH with a work supplied PC in two days.
Her room is a fair distance from the router meaning that wifi may not be
reliable enough - although she streams films all the time. So am
considering powerline rather than run ethernet cables through the house
and down a floor.

Given the short notice I don't have time to consider what is best, only
what to avoid. So are there any brands to definitely avoid?

Argos are local and have TP-Link pass-through ones in stock. Reasonable?
https://www.argos.co.uk/product/9156900


I bought several different ones a year or so ago, all "1Gbps", and all
of them did the same speed of about 30Mbps i.e. 3% of advertised!

Hence I bet they all use the same chip.


1Gbps sounds like specsmanship by a con merchant.
300M is possible at least on the same ring main but I think it all
depends critically on how good or otherwise your mains wiring is. Any
oxide corrosion on the various contacts and the signal is likely toast.

If such low speeds are ok for you then go ahead. It will just
dramatically slow down stuff like file transfers between computers, or
video playback of hi bitrate video from a network drive.


30Mbps will support full HD with plenty of room and one channel of QD on
a good day with a trailing wind. I never see less than 50M and typically
around 200M from what are nominally 300M and now quite elderly units.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #46  
Old May 18th 20, 06:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris
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Posts: 653
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

Martin Brown wrote:
On 16/05/2020 13:22, Peter wrote:

Chris wrote


My daughter is being moved to WFH with a work supplied PC in two days.
Her room is a fair distance from the router meaning that wifi may not be
reliable enough - although she streams films all the time. So am
considering powerline rather than run ethernet cables through the house
and down a floor.

Given the short notice I don't have time to consider what is best, only
what to avoid. So are there any brands to definitely avoid?

Argos are local and have TP-Link pass-through ones in stock. Reasonable?
https://www.argos.co.uk/product/9156900


I bought several different ones a year or so ago, all "1Gbps", and all
of them did the same speed of about 30Mbps i.e. 3% of advertised!

Hence I bet they all use the same chip.


1Gbps sounds like specsmanship by a con merchant.


Not sure I believe it either, but they're all doing it. Top end is "upto
2400Mbps".

https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/comput...91034-pdt.html


300M is possible at least on the same ring main but I think it all
depends critically on how good or otherwise your mains wiring is. Any
oxide corrosion on the various contacts and the signal is likely toast.

If such low speeds are ok for you then go ahead. It will just
dramatically slow down stuff like file transfers between computers, or
video playback of hi bitrate video from a network drive.


30Mbps will support full HD with plenty of room and one channel of QD on
a good day with a trailing wind. I never see less than 50M and typically
around 200M from what are nominally 300M and now quite elderly units.




  #47  
Old May 18th 20, 08:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
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Posts: 91
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

"Peter" wrote in message
...

Chris wrote

1Gbps sounds like specsmanship by a con merchant.


Not sure I believe it either, but they're all doing it. Top end is "upto
2400Mbps".


Shannon: the speed of a comms link depends only on the S/N ratio.

So how much noise is there in the GHz band? Sometimes a lot, sometimes
not.

Th attenuation also won't be pretty, but that can be addressed with
money

Anyway, for most people these boxes will be faster than their ADSL and
that is all that matters.



Depends how people use their network. If all/most of the traffic is from a
device to the outside world, then any network speed beyond the WAN speed is
superfluous.

But if there is traffic between two computers in the house (eg Roku box
running Plex, accessing PLex server PC; or one PC accessing an SMB share on
another one) then every bit [pun intended!] helps.

When my laptop accesses an SMB share on my main "server" PC over Ethernet
both sides of the router, it's **** hot: I've done a file copy that has run
at about 95% of the 1 Gbps speed of the Ethernet adaptor. But when it does
the same transfer using its 2.4 GHz wifi connection to the router (and then
Ethernet to the server) the speed is di the laptop rarely reports a link
speed of more than about 50 Mbps, and the transfer rate is then around 30%
of that. But for web access, I wouldn't notice, because even fairly slow
wifi may still be around the 30 Mbps VDSL connection to the outside world.

  #48  
Old May 18th 20, 08:58 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
UnsteadyKen
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Posts: 28
Default Powerline brands to avoid?

In article ,

Chris says...

Not sure I believe it either, but they're all doing it. Top end is "upto
2400Mbps".

What no specs seem to mention is the latency induced by these devices.

I play the on-line driving simulator Gran Turismo on the PS4 a lot.

I have in this room in my palatial sheltered housing flat; an Android
phone, a television, a Freeview STB, a Freesat STB, a Youview PVR, an AV
receiver, a universal Blu-Ray player and a laptop.
All of them need to be on the network.
Only the Android connects by WI-Fi the rest are wired through a network
switch.

I experimented a while back and found:
Playing Gran Turismo via a wired connection is fine as as expected,
Connecting via WI-Fi introduces a noticeable lag and generates some
comments about it from other players.
Connecting via the until now unused BT powerline adapters, renders the
game unplayable.

--
Ken
 




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