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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Where does 161 go?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 26th 19, 11:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mike M
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Where does 161 go?

The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike
  #2  
Old June 26th 19, 12:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 316
Default Where does 161 go?

The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike



I hadn't heard of 161 being used in scams but my guess is it has no
particular significance in the UK at all.

The usual MO of this kind of scam is to get the mark to call the
scammer back on some official looking number (so why not 111 police
non-emergency). The mark typically briefly hangs up and the scammer
plays a recording of dialtone, the digits the mark dials have no
effect the scammer merely passes the phone to his colleague.

AFAIK, the called party on the PSTN needs to hang for ten seconds to
clear down the call, unless the time has been reduced still further.



--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #3  
Old June 26th 19, 01:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Where does 161 go?

"Graham." wrote in message
...
The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike



I hadn't heard of 161 being used in scams but my guess is it has no
particular significance in the UK at all.

The usual MO of this kind of scam is to get the mark to call the
scammer back on some official looking number (so why not 111 police
non-emergency). The mark typically briefly hangs up and the scammer
plays a recording of dialtone, the digits the mark dials have no
effect the scammer merely passes the phone to his colleague.

AFAIK, the called party on the PSTN needs to hang for ten seconds to
clear down the call, unless the time has been reduced still further.



And to be absolutely certain, if you are suspicious, call another number (eg
your mobile) and make sure that rings. *Then* try the number that you have
been given.

  #4  
Old June 26th 19, 02:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Brown[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 193
Default Where does 161 go?

On 26/06/2019 13:21, NY wrote:
"Graham." wrote in message
...
The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike



I hadn't heard of 161 being used in scams but my guess is it has no
particular significance in the UK at all.

The usual MO of this kind of scam is to get the mark to call the
scammer back on some official looking number (so why not 111 police
non-emergency). The mark typically briefly hangs up and the scammer
plays a recording of dialtone, the digits the mark dials have no
effect the scammer merely passes the phone to his colleague.


I use the same script as I do on banks that cold call me. Prove to me
who *you* are or we go no further. Ring me back when you can do this or
put it in writing. Only once have Barclaycard fraud come back to me
quickly with a genuine specific question about a suspicious transaction.

AFAIK, the called party on the PSTN needs to hang for ten seconds to
clear down the call, unless the time has been reduced still further.


And to be absolutely certain, if you are suspicious, call another number
(eg your mobile) and make sure that rings. *Then* try the number that
you have been given.


It is better to ring your own number and make sure it rings engaged. If
the scammer answers your home number then you know they are criminals.

BT have tightened this timeout trick up to help prevent such frauds.
The other way is to use another separate mobile phone.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #5  
Old June 26th 19, 05:43 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 606
Default Where does 161 go?

On Wednesday, 26 June 2019 11:48:18 UTC+1, Mike M wrote:
The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike


161 and 162 are carrier prefixes. If you dial a few numbers after the code you should get a message about a network to which you are not subscribed - 162 still does, 161 says number not recognised.

162 was originally the prefix for Norweb, then P??? telecom, the Your Communications, then Thus and finally Vodafone fixed, although to my immense annoyance Voda withdrew this service (to replace it with a MUCH more expensive one) two or three years ago, so we ceased being customers.

Ironically I switched from Voda mobiles in 1987 for a similar reason - they just doubled the off peak call rates.

161 and 162 prefixes are now both entirely Vodafone or its subsidiaries.
  #6  
Old June 26th 19, 05:57 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 746
Default Where does 161 go?

On Wed 26/06/2019 12:12, Graham. wrote:
The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike



I hadn't heard of 161 being used in scams but my guess is it has no
particular significance in the UK at all.

The usual MO of this kind of scam is to get the mark to call the
scammer back on some official looking number (so why not 111 police
non-emergency). The mark typically briefly hangs up and the scammer
plays a recording of dialtone, the digits the mark dials have no
effect the scammer merely passes the phone to his colleague.

AFAIK, the called party on the PSTN needs to hang for ten seconds to
clear down the call, unless the time has been reduced still further.



The last bit is the wrong way round.
If the called party hangs up, the caller used to be able to hold the
line open for up to one meter unit or usually three minutes before
auto-cleardown cut in. BT have reduced that to about 10 seconds
specifically to counter this issue.

--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  #7  
Old June 29th 19, 11:30 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 606
Default Where does 161 go?

On Wednesday, 26 June 2019 21:16:28 UTC+1, Graham. wrote:
Woody Wrote in message:
On Wed 26/06/2019 12:12, Graham. wrote:
The dialled digits 161 have been linked to spam use but where, after
dial tone,wll 161 go to, I appear to get no tone so it could lead to
somewhere.

Mike


I hadn't heard of 161 being used in scams but my guess is it has no
particular significance in the UK at all.

The usual MO of this kind of scam is to get the mark to call the
scammer back on some official looking number (so why not 111 police
non-emergency). The mark typically briefly hangs up and the scammer
plays a recording of dialtone, the digits the mark dials have no
effect the scammer merely passes the phone to his colleague.

AFAIK, the called party on the PSTN needs to hang for ten seconds to
clear down the call, unless the time has been reduced still further.



The last bit is the wrong way round.
If the called party hangs up, the caller used to be able to hold the
line open for up to one meter unit or usually three minutes before
auto-cleardown cut in. BT have reduced that to about 10 seconds
specifically to counter this issue.

Indeed. I was simply speculating if
they might reduce the called
party cleardown timer to near-zero, thus matching ISDN, SIP,
Cellular, Skype, and just about every other voice comms system on
the planet.


Indeed, but historically UK [and other places] land line calls did not or only after about six minutes.

I used this feature once to catch a fraudster - his accomplice hung up when chased over car my friend had paid to have renovated [and he had sold to at least two other people]. The she then took the phone off the hook. After about five minutes she picked up again and was very surprised to find me still on the line. Eventually she fessed up the con man's real name and that he was bankrupt. He was arrested not long afterwards.

--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/


 




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